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Do I Need New Sway Bar Links?

My car has developed a clicking sound when steering near lock at low speed or stopped. I had a ranger come out. He checked it out and said it’s probably suspension and should be taken in, suggesting sway bar links and/or upper control arm ball joints. He also said it is not the loose steering rack issue.

2014 S85 with coil suspension, 80,000 miles.

I’ve got some time on my hands so I removed a sway bar link and it seems really “sloppy” to me. I’d imaging the ball joints should be quite a bit stiffer.

I made a short video of my link and I am wondering what you guys think.
Any help would be really appreciated.

Before the steering click began, the car did seem to have a subtle knocking
sound when driving at low speed on rough surfaces.

I did do the 12-6 test, jacking the car and trying to rock the wheel while holding it at 12-6 o’clock, to test the ball joint play and found none, but I’m going to look into that more.

 
Follow up to this.....
My suspension was getting progressively more clunky over low speed bumps. Then, my steering developed a sharp clicking noise when turning the wheel to near lock at low/no speed. That noise actually went away over time.

After driving down a rutted alley the clunking became so loud it was obvious a suspension component had failed.

Tesla replaced both front sway bar links and the problems are gone. I think it was about $200 total. There are aftermarket links on ebay for $100. Changing the links is really easy, but to get the whole thing done with OEM parts for $200 was fine.
 

slk-A4

Model S 85 12-2015
Oct 24, 2018
344
287
The Netherlands
I'm facing exactly the same problem at roundabout the same mileage, 135.000 kms.

ou can easily change them your self. I bought the non OEM parts for € 22,14 each. Triscan is a Danish manufacturer. They produce a lot of Tesla parts, sometimes better than the original US parts.
upload_4032.jpg
 
Yeah, I also have replaced all four. Suspension is completely quiet now.

It's really hard to notice anything wrong in the old links. They move nicely and quietly. However when I put them in screw bench and push with really hard force, I can feel maybe 0.5mm play.. It feels really unbelievable how that could cause so much sound in the car. But it was really horrible clink-clonk-clink-clonk in every smallest bump. :)

They are very easy to replace even by yourself. If you know how to change a wheel, you can change these. Swaybar links are easily accessible once the wheel is off.
 

Darmie

Super Member
Supporting Member
Jan 13, 2016
2,664
1,793
Clear Lake TX.
This is great info. It's things like this that should be a sticky. Thanks for the info, and thanks to

Zuikkis

to share how easy it is to change.
Yeah, I also have replaced all four. Suspension is completely quiet now.

It's really hard to notice anything wrong in the old links. They move nicely and quietly. However when I put them in screw bench and push with really hard force, I can feel maybe 0.5mm play.. It feels really unbelievable how that could cause so much sound in the car. But it was really horrible clink-clonk-clink-clonk in every smallest bump. :)

They are very easy to replace even by yourself. If you know how to change a wheel, you can change these. Swaybar links are easily accessible once the wheel is off.
 

Aggmeister2010

Active Member
Dec 26, 2018
1,172
1,052
TX
Do both front wheels need to be lifted to replace the sway bar links?

No, you can do them individually - however you will need two jacks. One to lift the car, and one to lift the hub to release tension on the end-link.

If you only have one jack, you could also use a post or large block of wood under the hub, and carefully lower the hub onto the block until you get to the point where you can remove one of the end link mounts.
 

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