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Finally did my Y road trip. It was incredible!

Dandesy

Member
Nov 29, 2020
88
134
Minneapolis, MN
I got a Y in December and of course, I love that thing. I know a lot of people here complain about just about everything, but I’ve had no issues.

I have been really eager to take it on a road trip, and finally took one last week. The itinerary was Minneapolis - Kansas City - Memphis- Nashville, and back via Rockford Illinois.
Total mileage: 2298.

Autopilot (NOA) was so nice, and worked incredibly well. Out of 33 hours of highway driving or so, I drove less than 2 hours. It made the trip so much easier to handle.
I wish I didn’t have to flick the stalk or apply force on the wheel so often, but that’s minor.
Question: I would flick the right stalk up when the display asked for some input. 90% of the time, that worked, but sometimes it didn’t and I had to put force on the wheel instead. Anybody knows the rationale behind that?

I had 3 instances of what it known as “phantom breaking”, always coming up on an underpass. What I noticed is that the car “thought” the speed limit went from 70 to 40. Not sure why, but I’m confident there was a good reason. No harm in the end.

The charging situation which was the other thing I was really curious about went incredibly smoothly as well. I just followed the navigation and it got me there in plenty of time. I also liked the pace; stopping every 90-150 minutes was perfect for my stretching needs. I found it very relaxing.

There’s no doubt that I will be taking many more road trips in the future. Thanks to my Tesla!
 

DaveORD

Member
Mar 12, 2020
683
588
Chicagoland
Glad it was a good trip. As for feedback on steering wheel, you can also adjust one of the scroll wheels to reset that timer. Any activity on the steering wheel should be adequate to prove you are there, to reset the nag timer, unless that got changed.
 

Dandesy

Member
Nov 29, 2020
88
134
Minneapolis, MN
Glad it was a good trip. As for feedback on steering wheel, you can also adjust one of the scroll wheels to reset that timer. Any activity on the steering wheel should be adequate to prove you are there, to reset the nag timer, unless that got changed.
That’s what I’m saying. Stalk or scroll wheels worked most of the time. But once in a while, nothing BUT pressure on the wheel would end the nag. It was fine, just wondering if that’s expected.
 
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DaveORD

Member
Mar 12, 2020
683
588
Chicagoland
Sorry, missed that. Perhaps I have not been on a long enough trip for some sort of secondary timer to kick in and force the steering wheel check. You mention approx 10 percent of the time you had to turn the wheel, so every 3 hours or so based on your 33 hours of driving? My longest trip thus far has only been 2 hours or so and the scroll wheels were all I needed.

NVM, did the math wrong. Time to walk away from the computer and call it a day...
 

Dandesy

Member
Nov 29, 2020
88
134
Minneapolis, MN
The nag happens every, what? 20, 30 seconds? Maybe once every five or so minutes, wheel check was the only thing that would work. Then the stalk was good for the next nag occurrence.
 

kishkaru

Member
Feb 3, 2020
191
171
The Bay, CA
When on NOA, dismissing the timeout via the scrollwheel does not work, especially when initiating a lane change. There is a secondary timer for wheel torque, and the car remembers the last time you were "alive". If you keep dismissing via scrollwheel, eventually (after some time) it will force you to torque the wheel to prove you are "alive". You must put torque on the wheel to "approve" the lane change if the secondary time has expired. If you need to make two lane changes in a row, for example within 20s, it won't ask you to "approve" for subsequent lane changes.

This is why I don't use scrollwheel for dismissing the timer at all anymore, I always use wheel torque. It's very confusing UX, espcially for new drivers. That's why tell anyone who drives my car on AP or NOA to dismiss via the wheel torque, and not mention the scrollwheel at all.
 

Dandesy

Member
Nov 29, 2020
88
134
Minneapolis, MN
When on NOA, dismissing the timeout via the scrollwheel does not work, especially when initiating a lane change. There is a secondary timer for wheel torque, and the car remembers the last time you were "alive". If you keep dismissing via scrollwheel, eventually (after some time) it will force you to torque the wheel to prove you are "alive". You must put torque on the wheel to "approve" the lane change if the secondary time has expired. If you need to make two lane changes in a row, for example within 20s, it won't ask you to "approve" for subsequent lane changes.

This is why I don't use scrollwheel for dismissing the timer at all anymore, I always use wheel torque. It's very confusing UX, espcially for new drivers. That's why tell anyone who drives my car on AP or NOA to dismiss via the wheel torque, and not mention the scrollwheel at all.
That’s not been my experience, but thanks for the info.
 

finman100

Member
Feb 4, 2016
32
19
Albany, OR
Basic Autopilot here (so...TACC and lane centering, but not the NOA, no auto lane changing with signal), signature below has the other details.

turning volume up or down via left scroll wheel works great for me. i can honestly say I've never noticed the "timing" of the nag, so I will monitor that next time out on a longer road trip. I suppose i mix in some torque on the wheel but it's becoming automatic so i don't notice the time frame.

Concur with the "forced" stops to recharge. Both car and human! amazingly, too few people reallize the Tesla road trip is a game changer.
 

SO16

Active Member
Feb 25, 2016
2,990
9,337
MI
I just rest my hand at 7 o’clock position on the wheel. No nag.
I also prefer to feel what the car is doing and knowing that I can quickly take over if there is an issue.

as far as the phantom braking, hopefully that will be solved with the next release of AP no longer relying on radar. Now I still keep my foot near the accelerator in case there is a phantom brake so I can react quicker. I don’t care to have the person behind me thinking I’m brake checking them. There’s enough road rage out there.
 

mark95476

Active Member
Jun 21, 2020
1,306
705
Bay Area CA
I 'boost it whenever I get a chance to separate myself from other vehicles.

I also prefer to feel what the car is doing and knowing that I can quickly take over if there is an issue.

as far as the phantom braking, hopefully that will be solved with the next release of AP no longer relying on radar. Now I still keep my foot near the accelerator in case there is a phantom brake so I can react quicker. I don’t care to have the person behind me thinking I’m brake checking them. There’s enough road rage out there.
 
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Johnny Vector

Member
Jun 21, 2020
180
243
Maryland
But my main point was absolutely not about nagging and braking.
It was about how great a Tesla can be on a 2300 mile road trip!
Agreed! I got mine just in time for my annual 600 mile (one-way) drive last summer. And despite the fact that I really do keep my hands on the wheel and pay attention (sometimes too much; I get nagged because I follow the same line the car does so I end up not putting any torque on the wheel), I still got to the end of the drive feeling far less tired than I ever have in a gasser. I feel like there's at least one psychology Ph.D. dissertation in figuring out why that is!
 

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