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Google sheets Supercharger data

David99

Active Member
Jan 31, 2014
4,850
7,024
Brea, Orange County
I'm creating a Google spread sheet to calculate trips between many Superchargers. I have a lot of data I can automatically calculate, it works well, but I want to auto calculate the time I need to charge at a Supercharger.

I have the battery percentage when I arrive and to how much I have to charge. I also have the Supercharger charge curve. What I can't figure out is a way to calculate the charge-time going say from 10% to 60% based on the SuC charge curve. Anyone can help me with that?
 

austinEV

Supporting Member
May 16, 2013
3,231
7,352
Austin
I'm creating a Google spread sheet to calculate trips between many Superchargers. I have a lot of data I can automatically calculate, it works well, but I want to auto calculate the time I need to charge at a Supercharger.

I have the battery percentage when I arrive and to how much I have to charge. I also have the Supercharger charge curve. What I can't figure out is a way to calculate the charge-time going say from 10% to 60% based on the SuC charge curve. Anyone can help me with that?

Yep, see enclosed. The charge_time tab is my attempt to reverse engineer the charging curve from the website.

View attachment travel_legs_2.xlsx
 

ItsNotAboutTheMoney

Well-Known Member
Jul 12, 2012
10,524
7,679
Maine
kW = kWh/h

You first need to translate kWh into %SoC, then any kW rate gives you %SoC/h.

Then
1) if you have a nice function that describes %SoC/h for a given %SoC you can use calculus: you'd need the integral, and then you can do integral(high) - integral(low) to calculate the time taken.
EDIT: er, wait, no, not quite. You'd want the reciprocal that gives h/%SoC, then integrate over %SoC to give you hours.

2) if you have a table of discrete rates at different %SoC, then you could:
a) calculate a conservative average rate between subrange of %SoC
b) then time = sum[pairs of %SoC]( (<high %SoC> - <low %SoC>) /<average %SoC/h> )

To help understand the second case, imagine you had a _constant_ charging rate of X%SoC/h.
Then it would be easy to calculate the time: (stop% - start%)/X hours.
If you can break down the start to stop range into parts, each with own average charging rate, you can calculate the time for each part and then add them up.
 
Last edited:

David99

Active Member
Jan 31, 2014
4,850
7,024
Brea, Orange County
Thanks for the help. I'll keep playing around and see what I can do.

@audstinEV I imported yours but it seems you entered the charge time by hand. That's what I have been doing so far as well looking up the data, but I wanted to automate it.
 

austinEV

Supporting Member
May 16, 2013
3,231
7,352
Austin
Thanks for the help. I'll keep playing around and see what I can do.

@audstinEV I imported yours but it seems you entered the charge time by hand. That's what I have been doing so far as well looking up the data, but I wanted to automate it.

Yes. I had not completed what you are trying either, but I do include a formula in there that equates time and SOC.
 

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