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Home Charging - L2

Grey_Tes_Y

New Member
Jun 7, 2021
4
0
Bothell
my apologies since this kind of queries has been discussed extensively but i still feel some of us are left with more question than a clear answers.

recently got a Y, now wondering where to go about getting about a fast charging at home.

current situation: Tesla provided Mobile charger, don't have a 240 Nema in the garage , so only 110 V charging currently.

Options: Get a 14-50 Nema outlet or hardwire a L2 like Tesla Charger($ 500) or Chargepoint flex Home ( I am getting this for $200 due to rebates from utility)

Now Nema outlet can work with mobile Chargers too and might save me from buying any L2 Like changepoint Flex Home. But electricians are Quoting almost $200 extra for outlet due to additional GFCI as well as outlet cost . so $900 for outlet vs $700 for hardwired connection.

Option 1 : Nema outlet only with Mobile charger - Total cost : $900 appox. +10% tax
Option 2: Nema outlet with L2 Chargepoint Home Flex - Total Cost $1200 +10% tax ( 900(installation) +200(charger) +100 (J7172 adapter)) .
Option 3: Hardwired Tesla Wall Charger - Total Cost $ 1200 +10% tax ($700 (installation) + 500(charger) )
Option 4: Hardwired Changepoint Home Flex - Total Cost $ 1000 +10% tax ( $700(installation) + 200(Charger) +100( J7172 adapter) )

all options run around $900 - $1200 with some types of pros and cons.

What do you guy suggest, should I do ?
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
3,245
3,219
Maryland
my apologies since this kind of queries has been discussed extensively but i still feel some of us are left with more question than a clear answers.

recently got a Y, now wondering where to go about getting about a fast charging at home.

current situation: Tesla provided Mobile charger, don't have a 240 Nema in the garage , so only 110 V charging currently.

Options: Get a 14-50 Nema outlet or hardwire a L2 like Tesla Charger($ 500) or Chargepoint flex Home ( I am getting this for $200 due to rebates from utility)

Now Nema outlet can work with mobile Chargers too and might save me from buying any L2 Like changepoint Flex Home. But electricians are Quoting almost $200 extra for outlet due to additional GFCI as well as outlet cost . so $900 for outlet vs $700 for hardwired connection.

Option 1 : Nema outlet only with Mobile charger - Total cost : $900 appox. +10% tax
Option 2: Nema outlet with L2 Chargepoint Home Flex - Total Cost $1200 +10% tax ( 900(installation) +200(charger) +100 (J7172 adapter)) .
Option 3: Hardwired Tesla Wall Charger - Total Cost $ 1200 +10% tax ($700 (installation) + 500(charger) )
Option 4: Hardwired Changepoint Home Flex - Total Cost $ 1000 +10% tax ( $700(installation) + 200(Charger) +100( J7172 adapter) )

all options run around $900 - $1200 with some types of pros and cons.

What do you guy suggest, should I do ?
Will the charging equipment be installed inside a garage or outdoors? If outdoors then a hard wired installation (either Tesla Wall Connector or Chargepoint) is a better option because of being fully weather rated, sealed against the elements.

When you add up the additional items needed for the NEMA 14-50 receptacle the $500 purchase price of the Wall Connector is in reality less than $200 more. The Tesla Charging Cord is 18.5 ft. long. If you need a longer charging cord then the Chargepoint or other EVSE may offer a 24 - 25 ft long charging cord.

Note: Tesla includes a J1772 adapter with the vehicle so unless you want to have a second J1772 adapter to keep in the vehicle you don't need to purchase the adapter.
 

Grey_Tes_Y

New Member
Jun 7, 2021
4
0
Bothell
indoor, yes sure i could save on that adapter and make sure to carry on out of the town trips.


that would bring down my option 4 down to 900 range same as getting an nema outlet installed only.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
3,245
3,219
Maryland
If your home has the additional capacity for a 50A or 60A circuit the Wall Connector can charge at 40A or 48A, faster than the 32A that is the limit of the Mobile Connector.

Also, the Wall Connector has a built in cable hanger for the charging cord and slot to store the Tesla charging connector. If you use the Mobile Connector then you will want to also add the Tesla Cable Organizer ($35) or similar kit from Amazon. The Cable Organizer includes a wall hanger for the charging cord, just as important the Cable Organizer includes a wall mount bracket for the Mobile Connector chassis. See photos #2, #3: Cable Organizer
 
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kindofblue

Member
Mar 14, 2021
107
73
Pismo Beach CA
@jacone Thanks for the note about the wall mount bracket for the mobile charger.

May I suggest that a faster charger than the OEM really isn't needed at home when you are charging overnight anyway. And $500 for an extra 10-12A/hr seems like a lot of $$ for this frugal Tesla driver.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
3,245
3,219
Maryland
@jacone Thanks for the note about the wall mount bracket for the mobile charger.

May I suggest that a faster charger than the OEM really isn't needed at home when you are charging overnight anyway. And $500 for an extra 10-12A/hr seems like a lot of $$ for this frugal Tesla driver.
The faster charging made possible by installing the Wall Connector on a 50A or 60A circuit (versus using the Mobile Connector and charging at up to 32A) is not needed in most cases. If there are multiple Tesla vehicles that need to be charged then faster charging is helpful. In the future Tesla has stated that two Wall Connectors will be able to share a single charging circuit. That is another benefit of the Wall Connector not related the maximum charging speed.
 

racerx2005

Member
Aug 6, 2021
142
343
New York
We had the Clipper Creek HCS-50 hardwired outdoor charging station installed back in 2015 for my wife’s Chevy Volt and currently for her 2019 Chevy Bolt, so I will keep the same set up and use the J1772 adapter to charge my MYP when I eventually get it (ordered on 8/5).

Is there any caveat as far as using the adapter? will that impact the charging “speed”? or am I overthinking this?
 

Watts_Up

Active Member
Mar 4, 2019
3,643
2,458
In a galaxy far, far away
Is there any caveat as far as using the adapter? will that impact the charging “speed”? or am I overthinking this?
You can adjust the charge speed from the car display if needed but it will be limited to 32 Amp by the car.

The only difference will be that there will be no button on the charger plug, so you will have to tap on the car plug cover to open it.,
or to open it from the screen, or using your phone, or using the voice activated (you know "Open the .... !!! ").

The car needs also to be unlocked. To avoid getting the car to lock itself while dealing with the cable,
you will just need to keep open a little bit the rear or the front door.

I would recommend keeping a second J1772 inside the car in case you want to charge your car using a public L2 charger.
 
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jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
3,245
3,219
Maryland
I use the Tesla J1772 adapter at home with an AmazingE 32A Level 2 EVSE (Powered by ClipperCreek), a second J1772 adapter when using a public Level 2 charging station. There is no reduction in charging amperage when using the Tesla J1772 adapter. The J1772 standard supports up to 80A, the current generation Tesla vehicles max out when Level 2 charging at 48A.

When the Tesla vehicle is locked you can't remove the J1772 adapter from the Tesla's charge port but you can remove the J1772 charging connector, cable from the adapter. My setup is inside my garage, I leave the J1772 adapter connected to the charging cable. Outdoors, not in use charging, the J1772 adapter would be easy to steal, it costs $95 on the Tesla site, about $10 less if you purchase an 3rd party J1772 adapter.

After charging has been completed if you unlock the charging port from the Tesla charging screen you can remove the J1772 adapter and the charging cable by pulling the charging cord with no need to press the trigger release on the J1772 adapter. They you can remove the Tesla J1772 adapter from the J1772 charging connector if you want or just leave the J1772 adapter in place for the next time you charge.
 
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jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
3,245
3,219
Maryland
When using a Public L2 Charger, I use a Collar Lock to avoid someone to unplug the cable.
I've seen the collar lock accessory on eBay. I've never had someone unplug my Model Y while it is charging or even after charging has been completed. I would be concerned that someone might damage the charge port on my Model Y if they use force to try and free the charging connector. My only issue continues to be EV owners who park close to the line, in the space next to where I need to park to charge my Model Y. The worst offender drives a Chevrolet Spark EV. You could park 1.5 Spark EVs side by side in the parking space and somehow the Spark EV is always parked close to the line, next to my Model Y.
 

mkarl

New Member
Jul 26, 2021
3
1
Northern California
This may have been previously addressed: my apologies. I have a Model Y on order, and electrician has advised me that our available amps are maxed out. Recommended using an LMC "Load Management Controller" to work with the charger when the existing service will be overloaded. The cost of upgrading the main circuit is such that I would cancel the Model Y order. Would appreciate any comments or advice. Many thanks.
 

TomServo

Active Member
Apr 10, 2014
1,539
991
Belleville IL
I like the flexibility of having the 14-50 outlet, EVSE’s can fail, and in that instance you could plug in the UMC. I asked my electrician to wire a pig tail on my HPWC, I can live with 40 amps/36 mph charging speeds.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
3,245
3,219
Maryland
This may have been previously addressed: my apologies. I have a Model Y on order, and electrician has advised me that our available amps are maxed out. Recommended using an LMC "Load Management Controller" to work with the charger when the existing service will be overloaded. The cost of upgrading the main circuit is such that I would cancel the Model Y order. Would appreciate any comments or advice. Many thanks.
Question: How many miles per day, during the week, do you typically drive?

If you have a standard 120V, 15 amp circuit with a receptacle that you can use either in your garage or on your driveway then you can charge the Tesla Model Y at up to 4 miles per hour of range while charging. If you have 10 hours available to charge that would enable ~30 to 40 miles of driving each day.

If you have a laundry room with an electric dryer, near where the Model Y will be parked, you can share the 240V, 30 amp dryer circuit using a Dryer Buddy device or the NeoCharge Smart Splitter device. Either one costs ~$400. When using a 30A circuit you would be limited to charging at 24 amps, this would provide up to ~21 miles per hour of charging.

Are either of these an option for charging your Model Y?
 
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mkarl

New Member
Jul 26, 2021
3
1
Northern California
Thank you for the replies:
1. If I install a 14-50 outlet and try to charge with other devices (air conditioning, dryer, etc) running, and I exceed the available amps, won't I start to
trigger breakers? Do I need to go to the garage every night after everyone is asleep to start to charge. Not acceptable.
2. Standard 120V plug inadequate charging for my needs
3. Laundry room, dryer plug too far away
Any comments on LMC (Load Management Controller). Apparently used with multiple EVs, but what about a single residential EV?
Greatly appreciate any help. Thanks.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
3,245
3,219
Maryland
Re: 1. If you or an electrician has done a load calculation for your home and determined that there is not adequate capacity to add a 50 amp circuit for a 14-50 receptacle for charging an EV then consider a lower amperage 240V circuit. In most cases any 240V circuit will be adequate for daily EV charging needs. There are 20 amp, 30 amp and 40 amp 240V charging options in addition to the 50 amp circuit. People read somewhere that the 14-50 is the receptacle to get without consideration for whether their home has the capacity for an additional 50 amp circuit or whether their daily charging needs could be fully met with a lower amperage charging circuit.

(Yes, you can set up Scheduled Charging so that the Tesla vehicle will start charging late in the evening after other electrical appliances are not currently active.)

Here is a link: Charging table - time to charge at 120/240V considering efficiency+

As previously noted, do you have a good estimate of how many miles per day you typically drive during the week and on the weekend?

I would give serious consideration to whether a 6-20 receptacle (capable of charging an EV at 240V and 16 amps) would meet your needs. The Tesla vehicle would be able to gain ~13 miles of range per hour while charging. If you have 8 hours available overnight to charge (almost everyone has 8 hours) this circuit would enable adding over 100 miles of range to the Tesla Model Y.

A 14-30 receptacle would be capable of charging an EV at 240 and 24 amps, adding ~20 miles per hour of charging. Over the same 8 hours this would yield ~160 miles of range added to the Tesla vehicle.

2 and 3; understood.

4. No idea.
 

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