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Iceland's Hydrogen Power

Discussion in 'Energy, Environment, and Policy' started by tonybelding, Jun 7, 2007.

  1. tonybelding

    tonybelding Active Member

    Aug 17, 2006
    Hamilton, Texas
    Not progressing as many had hoped. . .

    It appears they have one hydrogen fueling station, no cars, and the hydrogen buses they had been using for a while have been retired -- with one placed in a transportation museum.  And yet, the report makes no mention of any alternatives -- nothing about battery-electric cars.  I Googled for older articles about Iceland and hydrogen, and I found a lot of "hydrogen hype" articles, but again never the briefest mention of BEVs.  It's a pretty big blind spot they seem to have over in Iceland.

    I have heard an argument saying that Hawaii would be the most perfect place to sell electric cars.  Gasoline is quite expensive there, and the usual range limitations of electric cars are no concern at all, since you can't drive off the islands anyhow.  I don't think Hawaii has invested as heavily as Iceland in geothermal power, but they are producing some (, and the potential is obvious.
  2. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

    Aug 20, 2006
    Silicon Valley
  3. Brent

    Brent Member

    Apr 18, 2007
    Los Angeles, CA
    I visited (Photo1) the station back in 2003 -- when I was still looking forward to a hydrogen future -- and bought a few items from the convenience store located nearer the gasoline area. The hydrogen area was actually kinda neat to see. I believe the hydrogen was generated on site, with a small "factory" behind, and the pump itself had a futuristic tinge to it.

    Physics aside, if Iceland can't make hydrogen happen, I'm not sure it can happen anywhere. The country has access to cheap electricity from its geothermal and hydro plants, and has a small but wealthy population that seems to be focused on finding green solutions to many problems.

    Incidentally, the Blanda Power station was among the most unusual I've seen: Photo2

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