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iPod Classic

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by tonybelding, Sep 13, 2007.

  1. tonybelding

    tonybelding Active Member

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    I got a new iPod Classic today! It's the 80 GB silver model.

    It's amazing how these things have advanced. It's half the thickness of my 1st gen iPod, holds 16 times as much music, and has well over twice the battery life.

    Incidentally, my 1st gen iPod is still working perfectly -- on its original Li-poly battery. I got into a conversation about this today with somebody who refuses to buy an iPod because the batteries aren't user-changeable. He swore and be damned that an iPod battery couldn't last more than two years. Mine is six years old and still working fine.

    When I pressed him on the subject, he insisted that any Li-ion cell would be effectively dead -- reduced to 20% capacity -- after five years at the latest, even if it was never used. Well. . . My iPod was rated for 12 hours when it was new, and I recently took it stargazing and played it for six hours straight. I don't know how much longer it would have run, that was as long as I could stay up!

    Why has mine held up so well? As many of us have recently learned, Li-ion cells degrade with usage and age, and the aging is accelerated by high temperatures and high state-of-charge. My iPod hasn't been heavily used , it hasn't been cycled hundreds of times, and it has spent long periods of time in storage at a low charge level. Under those conditions an unusually long service life is exactly what we should expect.

    The old iPod was rated for 12 hours when new. The new iPod Classic is rated for 30 hours of music playback per charge. That means it will experience even fewer charge-and-discharge cycles in ordinary usage, so it should lose capacity even slower. It also has allowance for even more capacity loss; after the new one is degraded 50% it'll still have more capacity than the old one did when new.

    You might wonder, if the old iPod was still working well then why did I get a new one? I can put my entire music collection on the new one, which is rather convenient. The reduced weight and thickness should make it a bit more comfortable to carry on my longer walks. The thing that really prompted me, though, is that I expect to be getting a new car sometimes in the near future which comes with an iPod interface. The old iPod doesn't have dock connector, so it wouldn't have worked with that.
     
  2. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    Wink! Wink!
    Say no more!

    ----

    BTW:
    I once got a surplus of old Sun computer microphone batteries. (I think they are made by Toshiba). These are 3V Li-Ion quarter sized batteries. I kept them because they fit in some PCs to use as the CMOS battery backup. Well, they are at least 8 years old now, yet I am amazed that they all still seem to be just at 3V. In other words they have held their full charge all these years just sitting on a shelf.
     
  3. vfx

    vfx Well-Known Member

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    Tony's comments on Ipod obsolescence bring home the point of the EVs being like computers.

    I assume that there will be some Tesla Store software upgrades for a while but how fast will the Roadster become the car equivalent of one of those brick cell phones?
     
  4. tonybelding

    tonybelding Active Member

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    Not the Roadster. I believe the Roadster has got "classic" written all over it.

    The styling is timeless, it's not tied to any current fashion. The suspension and steering are inherited from the Elise and tuned by Lotus, so there's no improving on that. The motor and power control electronics are already 90% efficient, so there's not much more that can be done with them.

    The whole thing is built on a structure of aluminum alloy and carbon fiber. These are the materials that car companies would like to build ordinary cars from, someday in the future, when they get the prices down to within reason.

    The only thing that's subject to major future improvement is the ESS -- the battery pack. If you're considering any future variations of Li-ion batteries, there's no reason to think that'll be a difficult upgrade. The only thing that would make them obsolete would be the appearance of a radically different and superior storage technology, like EEStor's thing if it lives up to the hype. I could see it being impractical to put those into the car without redesigning and replacing a lot of stuff.

    So maybe the future electric car can go 500 miles per charge, and your old Roadster can't be made to do that. Okay. I can live with that. For the kind of car it is, 200+ miles will do. (And I'll be disappointed if the range doesn't get up to at least 300 with Li-ion cells at some point in the next decade or so.)

    Incidentally. . . The first Lotus Esprit was unveiled at the Turin motorshow in 1972. Lotus produced them from 1976 through 2004. That car spanned 1/4 of the entire history of the automobile. It's not like the computer industry.
     
  5. tonybelding

    tonybelding Active Member

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    Oh, and incidentally. . .

    I've discovered that my shiny new iPod Classic has a weaker amplifier circuit than the 1st gen iPod. It doesn't have enough power to really properly drive my Etymotic ER6i earbuds. The bass is weak, and when I try boosting the bass with the iPod's equalizer, then the whole thing sounds soft and muddy. If I feed it through an amplifier first, and then to the ER6i, the sound comes to life and basically sounds like my old iPod always did.

    So. . . I can either accept compromised sound quality or I can tote an amplifier around with me, which would negate the convenience of a smaller iPod. :(

    This is something else to consider while waiting for the Tesla Roadster to become awfully old and outdated. Sure, future electric cars will have better specs on paper, but I'm sure companies will also find new ways to cut corners in areas they don't think we'll notice.
     
  6. vfx

    vfx Well-Known Member

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    "The only thing that's subject to major future improvement is the ESS -- the battery pack. If you're considering any future variations of Li-ion batteries, there's no reason to think that'll be a difficult upgrade."

    And the accompanying computer hardware and software. I think the inverter would need a near replacement with new battery technology (Beyond the 6871 multi cell concept).

    On the good side, There are probably enough wealthy owners that will not upgrade to the 2010 model who will want to help fund the battery upgrade on the original "classic" Roadster.



    By the way Tony, what IS the image that you are sporting? I see red (Tesla like) and what might be a windshield arc as seen from above and some vertical blue stripes. Beyond that I am stumped.
     
  7. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    Tony, I agree 100% with your comments about the Roadster being a classic out of the gate. And yes, the ESS seems like the major component most likely to evolve in the coming years. I would imagine that the radio/nav/mutl-function battery monitor thing would also evolve. Other things that could change from year to year would be color choices, seat materials, etc.

    I would never buy a vehicle with a plan to retrofit it with future technology. Car companies have to stay much more focused on selling the new product, and tend not to want to dwell a lot on what was already sold.

    By the way, Tony's Avatar/icon is from a coin op video game with a car/spaceship that has a slight resemblance to the roadster.
     

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