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Range Anxiety (again)

Today I went out and got in the car to discover an inconsiderate previous driver in my household left it at 71 miles indicated range. Oh well, thought I, my destination is only 24 miles away, plenty to make it back home. By the time I got a mile down the road it was 64 miles. By the time I went up hill for 3 miles on the highway it was 22. I reached my exit with 7 miles estimated, spotting a gas station, I pulled in with a sigh of relief. You can guess what ensued after that. This traumatizing experience really made me wish I had just moved the bleeping minivan and driven the fully charged Tesla it was blocking instead. Would have saved so much frustration.
 
@Stavinski , it would have been interesting to use the Tesla NOA (Navigate on Autopilot) to show the estimated consumption to your destination.
And also displaying the consumption graph, as the car constantly recalculate the available range based on your current driving to give a better prediction.

The NOA feature doesn't (yet... ) supports Waypoints like when using Google Map or ABRP (A Better Route Planner),
so you would not be able to determine directly if you would be able to return home without stopping at a super charger.

Note: I prefer Tesla displaying the "SOC %" (State of Charge Percentage) instead of the "available range" which is more intuitive.
This is like when using a phone, and having the choice to have a phone displaying "2 Hours of use available" instead "10 % battery available."

So considering the Model Y LR AWD 326 miles (EPA) range estimate, between 80% and 20% you would have in fact about 195 miles usable range.
And the original "71 miles" of range available would have shown about "22 %" of battery available, which would have raised concerned before leaving home.

After driving 24 miles, the range should have been around 14%, and after return home for another 24 miles, you would had about 7%.
In your situation, after driving one mile instead of 64 miles range, you would had seen about 20% and instead of 22 miles it would have been 7%,
and then instead of 7 miles it would have been about 2%.




 
Last edited:
@Stavinski , it would have been interesting to use the Tesla NOA (Navigate on Autopilot) to show the estimated consumption to your destination.

The NOA feature doesn't (yet... ) supports Waypoints like when using Google Map or ABRP (A Better Route Planner),
so you would not be able to determine directly if you would be able to return home without stopping at a super charger.

I prefer Tesla displaying the "SOC %" (State of Charge Percentage) instead of the "available range" which is more intuitive.
This is like when using a phone, and having the choice to have a phone displaying "2 Hours of use available" instead "10 % battery available."

So considering the Model Y LR AWD 326 miles (EPA) range estimate, between 80% and 20% you would have in fact about 195 miles usable range.
And the original "71 miles" of range available would have shown about "22 %" of battery available, which would have raised concerned before leaving home.

After driving 24 miles, the range should have been around 14%, and after return home for another 24 miles, you would had about 7%.


I think you missed the part where OP said they were driving the minivan.
 
@Stavinski , it would have been interesting to use the Tesla NOA (Navigate on Autopilot) to show the estimated consumption to your destination.
And also displaying the consumption graph, as the car constantly recalculate the available range based on your current driving to give a better prediction.

The NOA feature doesn't (yet... ) supports Waypoints like when using Google Map or ABRP (A Better Route Planner),
so you would not be able to determine directly if you would be able to return home without stopping at a super charger.

Note: I prefer Tesla displaying the "SOC %" (State of Charge Percentage) instead of the "available range" which is more intuitive.
This is like when using a phone, and having the choice to have a phone displaying "2 Hours of use available" instead "10 % battery available."

So considering the Model Y LR AWD 326 miles (EPA) range estimate, between 80% and 20% you would have in fact about 195 miles usable range.
And the original "71 miles" of range available would have shown about "22 %" of battery available, which would have raised concerned before leaving home.

After driving 24 miles, the range should have been around 14%, and after return home for another 24 miles, you would had about 7%.
In your situation, after driving one mile instead of 64 miles range, you would had seen about 20% and instead of 22 miles it would have been 7%,
and then instead of 7 miles it would have been about 2%.




Yes, all of that would have been much better there’s no doubt. At least I didn’t have to push it home.
 
I think you missed the part where OP said they were driving the minivan.

@MattM24 in fairness, @Stavinski didn't make it very clear. They "got in the car" (not "minivan" or "ice vehicle" or really anything other than implying "the car" would be their Model Y) and saw x miles of range. They only implied they were driving the minivan at the end of the post. I had to read it more than once to understand what really happened.
 
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Maybe a submission to The Misery Index to see just how traumatic this was...

They must get a lot of contributions about EVs and Teslas... :rolleyes:
Excellent idea! What we should really be focusing on, though, is who is the inconsiderate slouch who left the van in this condition ( it was me ) and the level of ridicule that is appropriate for even owning a minivan. I’ll simply point out that minivans used to be cool when station wagons were not. We seem to have flip flopped on that one because the Y is definitely cool, and the minivan is definitely not. I can’t help it if the cars last longer than the coolness factors.
 
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Maurice1

Active Member
Oct 22, 2018
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Nijmegen
1622471483334.png
 
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Today I went out and got in the car to discover an inconsiderate previous driver in my household left it at 71 miles indicated range. Oh well, thought I, my destination is only 24 miles away, plenty to make it back home. By the time I got a mile down the road it was 64 miles. By the time I went up hill for 3 miles on the highway it was 22. I reached my exit with 7 miles estimated, spotting a gas station, I pulled in with a sigh of relief. You can guess what ensued after that. This traumatizing experience really made me wish I had just moved the bleeping minivan and driven the fully charged Tesla it was blocking instead. Would have saved so much frustration.

I won't have to worry about this soon, selling my Miata as soon as I find a buyer at a reasonable price, and after the Y arrives I will sell my last ICE car (2004 Mitsubishi Lancer sportback Ralliart)... so the only thing that can block in the Y would be the fully charged Bolt EV :D

Keith
 
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