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Review of Honda Clarity Fuel Cell Vehicle (plus planned switch to Tesla)

tps5352

Supporting Member
Oct 30, 2019
324
203
Bay-Delta Region, California, USA
I was asked to review my Honda Clarity fuel cell car, and why I hope to replace it in 2020 with a Tesla.

Background
  • Retired civil servant. (Decidedly not a millionaire.)
  • Six foot, five inches tall—so adequate roominess is a factor.
  • In 2016, contemplated buying my first ever new car. Wanted (a) less/no gasoline, (b) dependability, (c&d) adequate range and performance, and if the truth be known (e) some sort of “gee whiz” factor.
  • Test drove Tesla S and X models at three Tesla dealerships in northern California. Fell in love—so cool. But my more frugal (read, “cheap”) self said, “Honda plug-in hybrid.” Decided to watch and wait (no rush).
  • December 2016: my perfectly-running 1992 Honda Accord was t-boned and spun 180 degrees at the center of a four-way intersection. The Accord remained driveable, but replacement was clearly indicated sooner rather than later.
  • Attended early 2017 Honda promotional event for fuel cell Clarity. Impressed. (The plug-in hybrid and all-electric versions were not to be available until later that year; I couldn’t wait.) Three-year lease only; perfect for my plans to re-visit Tesla.
  • Took delivery of “pioneering” Honda Clarity fuel cell car in May 2017.
  • About the Clarity fuel cell car:
    o Semi-luxurious interior, four-door sedan. Similar in size and features to an equivalent Honda Accord.
    o A non-plug-in electric car with electric motor. Generates electricity using fuel cell technology (fuel cells
    were used on Apollo moon missions of the 1970s).
    o No internal combustion. Chemical interaction of hydrogen gas (fuel) and atmospheric oxygen creates
    water and electricity, stored in the batteries.
    o No (nonpoint source) pollution by the car. (But there can be point source pollution during the industrial
    production of hydrogen gas—e.g., from natural gas--depending on the technology used.)
    o Available in the USA only in California, I believe.
    o Leasing (for 3 years) only. (Toyota and Hyundai make fuel cell cars for sale).
    o Range: Close to 300 miles. Good.
    o Fuel availability: In Truckee, Sacramento, San Francisco Bay, mid-Central Valley, Los Angeles, and San
    Diego areas. No hydrogen fuel for passenger cars in most other states, I believe, and in outlying
    California areas.
    o Mechanics of fueling: similar to that for gasoline.
    o Cost to refill: somewhat more than for premium gasoline. (But Honda currently provides free fuel for 3
    years.)
    o Cost: Lease is about $400 per month for three years.
    o Eligible for California HOV sticker.
    o California clean air rebate (in 2017 was ~$5,000, I believe).
Review

Evaluation in three parts:

1. Physical aspects of the car itself (exterior and interior)
2. Performance—handling, acceleration, etcetera.
3. Fueling (with an alternative power source).

The Car Itself
  • Appearance: OK, but not my favorite thing. I don’t care for the partial rear-wheel body panel overlap (but it improves aerodynamics/fuel efficiency, I’m told). And the back end is like my own (aging) rear end—i.e., overly expanded. (But the car’s pear-shape is partially necessitated by the larger of two fuel storage tanks.) Bottom line: it is no Tesla Model S. (But the Clarity gets compliments, so maybe it is just me. And I have it for its personality, not its looks.)
  • Interior: Good; better than good. Comfortable, heated leather front bucket seats. Adequately roomy cabin. Like being in an equivalent Accord. Front visibility through the windshield is somewhat curtailed by a radar(?) module. (True in other new cars? Miniaturization should eventually help overcome this problem.) Rear seating? Similar to other mid-sized cars, I guess—I’ve never tried them.
  • Controls: I dislike the control buttons (for Park, Reverse, Neutral, and Drive). After two years I just can’t get used to not having some sort of lever. The “ignition” switch is a button; the key a fob (as with Teslas). The parking brake button is also annoying. (It is probably just me. I will probably love controls in a Tesla because,..well because it's a Tesla for crying out loud.)
  • Interior Electric devices: Powered windows, climate control, front seats, side mirrors, door locks, etcetera. Typical Honda reliability. It all works well and reliably.
  • Digital Touch Display: (Though smaller than in the Teslas) LOVE it. What a great innovation (for all cars). The updateable Garmin GPS map navigation program has proven very handy—my first car with this technology. Apple CarPlay (standard feature) works great to integrate iPhone apps (e.g., Maps) into the Honda’s display, if desired. So I can be told where to go in no uncertain terms by either Apple’s Siri or by “Stella” (my name for the Honda map display female voice). And what great timing on the technology. Convenient map-displayed traffic conditions (Sacramento, I-80, San Francisco) are increasingly important.
  • The central rear-view camera (when in Reverse) is now, for me, also essential, and I enjoy the right-side turn-signal-activated camera view (unfortunately there is no left-side camera and I hear that the right-side-camera system was removed from later model-years).
  • Bottom line: From the inside it is probably equivalent to piloting a (fat) Accord.
Ride and Performance
  • Good and good.
  • As with most electric vehicles, acceleration is peppy (but as you’ve hear me say, it’s no Tesla). I haven’t really tested performance—it is not my car, after all. On the few occasions I’ve briefly mashed the accelerator pedal, the car lunges forward, albeit with a slight delay. My guess is that Honda has installed a reliable and powerful front-drive motor, albeit with governors to prevent “ludicrous” driver behavior. This vehicle is obviously intended for a somewhat more sedate crowd (than those purchasing a performance version of the Model S, for example).
  • Parts I’ve paid for: windshield wipers.
  • Repairs: Just standard yearly maintenance visits ($300+) combined with a couple of free corrective recalls. No big deal.
  • Handling is not as good as with my (wide) 1992 Honda Accord. But it is OK. Again, I have not pushed it (e.g., on winding roads at speed).
  • Conclusion: Perfectly OK. (But it’s no Tesla, blah, blah…)
Fueling
  • Ah, here we go…
  • Up ‘till now I would totally recommend this car to anyone desiring a mid-priced, well-appointed four-door sedan. (The Clarity would retail at about $60,000, I believe; that cost mostly because of the high-tech under the hood.) But fuel availability has lately been a real bummer.
  • For 1½ years things were fine. My driving needs were modest. The single West Sacramento fuel pump (for the entire greater Sacramento metropolitan area) was, believe it or not, adequate; never congested or entirely unavailable. Two new Shell fueling sites were added in 2018, one in northern (I-80) and one in southern (I-50) Sacramento. Looking good.
  • Unfortunately, by Thanksgiving 2018 the aging West Sacramento hydrogen pump (oldest in the then Linde [now Iwatani] system) was consistently and chronically faltering.
  • Then came some sort of significant (but fortunately non-injury) explosion in Santa Clara at a hydrogen distribution center in early June 2019. This shut down deliveries of gaseous hydrogen all over northern California, just when the West Sacramento station I depend on--which ironically takes deliveries of liquid (not gaseous) hydrogen and therefore had an adequate H2 supply--decided to definitively break down. For weeks extending into months drivers could purchase little to no hydrogen fuel in Sacramento and the Bay area. As of November 2019 hydrogen supply is still not back to “normal.”

    These facts point to a significant hydrogen infrastructure reliability problem, at least in northern California. (Coincidentally, I hope, there was also a hydrogen-fuel-related, non-fatal explosion June 2019 in Norway, of all places, that affected sales of hydrogen vehicles there. Conspiracy-theorists: have at it blaming Big Oil.)
  • The bottom line: Fuel-cell-car-customers need to feel confident they will have ready access to fuel. Fuel providers and vehicle manufacturers need to be confident there will be customers. It is a delicately balanced system in its infancy that was all too easily thrown out of whack in northern California by one relatively minor incident and an arguably overly-cautious (excessive?) regulatory response.
Honda Clarity Review Conclusions
  • What is in store for hydrogen vehicles in the USA? I don’t know.
  • Am I happy I participated in this three-year experiment? Yes I am.
  • Do I like the Clarity car? Yes I do.
  • Would I recommend a Honda Clarity fuel cell car to others? No I would not.

    Busy families, working people, those with daily schedules, and folks with only one vehicle (i.e., most people) need confidence in dependable fuel availability. Right now, that appears to be lacking for hydrogen fuel in northern California.
Is There a Tesla in My Future?
  • You betcha. (At least, I hope so.)
  • Still six-months out, so…that. But right now I am planning for a Model X, long range version. Love the Model S, glad the Model 3 is here, and Tesla performance versions are cool--if younger I might be tempted. But I think the Model X is (literally) a better fit. Why?

    o Easier access/egress (than a Models S or 3). (I have still minor, but increasing mobility issues.)
    o Somewhat greater interior spaciousness and visibility (than other models).
    o More cargo space.
    o Surprisingly, not a fan of the falcon-wing doors. (Vertically-opening doors have arguably been
    problematic throughout automotive history.) But Tesla has had time to iron out the kinks and I probably
    won’t use them as much as front side- and rear-cargo doors. (Too bad falcon-wing doors are not an
    option.)
    o My early complaint about where the automatically-adjusted (as seat reclines) headrest hit my neck bone
    has apparently been dealt with (headrests can now be raised and lowered manually, I believe)
    o I would prefer a no- or removable-rear-seats version, but rear seats can now at least be fully reclined
    forward to give greater cargo space (in 5-seat version I favor).
    o Even in SUV and extended range configuration, it has more than enough performance and safety for me.
    o And it’s a freaking Tesla, for heaven’s sake!--with all those terrific features.
So that is my story. Looking forward to 2020 (which otherwise may be a nasty year). Any questions?

Addendum (January 23, 2021):
  • Boy, was I ever right about 2020 being nasty.
  • My car was in the shop for approaching 2½ months (December 2019-February 2020) due to the fuel cell stack recall that affected most early Clarity FCEVs. Some recalled cars were taken off lease and retired early by Honda. In my case the decision was made to repair the vehicle and keep it on the road.
  • In March 2020 I chose to extend my Honda Clarity lease for one more year due to uncertainties related to the Covid pandemic, rumors of a "refresh" for Tesla Models S and X, and the approach of intriguing new electric vehicles from Lucid, Rivian, and others.
  • This gave me time to gradually eliminate other BEV makes/models from consideration due such things as cost, late planned release-dates, undesirable or absent features, and other factors.
  • Meanwhile, I began to notice disturbing online reports of car industry dissatisfaction with hydrogen as an energy source for consumer road cars. Apparently, builders like Volkswagen and Mercedes grew increasingly disenchanted with hydrogen's greater production, transportation, and dissemination costs, and with its overall cost-per-unit-energy inefficiency compared with electricity used in BEVs.
  • Right now, as are many people, I am waiting to learn the details of any Tesla "refresh."
  • Meanwhile, the always poor-reliability (Linde/Iwatani) hydrogen fuel dispenser I've been forced to use in the next town over (12 miles away) has been taken off-line for at least 1½ months for its long-overdue upgrade (just as I near the end of my fuel cell adventure). And 16 new Tesla superchargers have just been installed ½-mile from my house. Is this a clear sign, or what?
FWD Open - 3.JPG
 
Last edited:

mblakele

beep! beep! 💉
Mar 7, 2016
1,691
5,296
SF Bay Area
Thanks for the thoughtful post.

Sorry if I missed it, but are you also considering a Model Y?

Model Y | Tesla

I'd think the Y would give you most of what you like about the X, but at a lower price and without the falcon-wing doors. Accessibility is still something of a question mark, but there's some discussion here:

Model Y ease of entry
 

tps5352

Supporting Member
Oct 30, 2019
324
203
Bay-Delta Region, California, USA
Thanks for the thoughtful post.

Sorry if I missed it, but are you also considering a Model Y?

Thank you. Hope my post is informative and entertaining.

Yes, I will certainly examine/drive the Models 3 and Y, which of course were not available in 2016, when I first considered Tesla.

I am also pleased that there are today many new innovative electric vehicles (e.g., pickup trucks, motorcycles, 4x4s) here or arriving soon. However, so far it seems to me that Tesla still remains ahead of the pack on range and overall package.

*****

Some additional random thoughts on the Clarity and Tesla cars:
  • The interior features I like about the Honda Clarity--heated seats, GPS navigation, touch-screen display, rear-facing camera display, etc.--are, of course, available in many other new cars from various manufacturers. Traveling technologically from 1992 (Honda Accord) to 2017 (Honda Clarity) with just one change of cars was fun.
  • Drive-train design--electric motor, to single-speed gearbox, etc.--in the Clarity is similar, I imagine, to that of other electric vehicles (though performance vehicles use two motors, correct?).
  • What sets the Honda Clarity, Toyota Mirai, and Hyundai Nexo apart are their use of fuel cell stacks to chemically/mechanically generate electricity.
  • Coincidentally, hydrogen fuel cell technology was refined in part for road car use just ten miles away from me by the "California Fuel Cell Partnership" (founded 1999; West Sacramento), consisting of a rare collaboration among Daimler-Chrysler, GM, Honda, Hyundai, Nissan, Toyota, and Volkswagen as well as energy-providers and government agencies.
  • Having driven a couple of rental cars recently, it seems like there has been some (regulatory-required?) convergence of control design/placement (e.g., on the steering wheel) among manufacturers, which I applaud.
  • Unstated in my post is that the Honda Clarity and Tesla (Model X) may be stepping stones for me towards an eventual self-driving vehicle. As I age, I appreciate the arrival of this new tech. It is coming at an opportune time (as Baby Boomers age). The Clarity has certain driving aids (e.g., collision avoidance and lane maintenance assistance). I take it that a Tesla will have (many) more. If I live long enough, I hope to see true self-driving cars that can provide safe on-road independence to older folks.
  • Having just read the Model X owner's manual (of course available digitally online) I liken the Tesla to a feature-packed computer on four wheels.
  • This summer (British) commentators for the 2019 24 hours of Le Mans race discussed hydrogen fuel cell technology (e.g., its likely dominance in upcoming Le Mans racing). They stated something surprising to me: that hydrogen was outpacing plug-in battery technology in the competition to supply alternative-fuel vehicles in Europe. Surprising (or perhaps not), because this seems opposite to the USA situation. As long as gasoline goes away (except for hobbyists and racing enthusiasts), I do not care who "wins." In fact, why not a plug-in, fuel cell vehicle (like the new European Mercedes) with a solar-paneled roof?
  • I enjoy Formula 1 Grand Prix racing (on video)--arguably the pinnacle of on-pavement, open-wheel circuit racing. The cars are currently powered by incredibly sophisticated (expensive) 6-cyclinder, turbo-hybrid engines, using both gasoline and electricity. As far as I know, there are no plans to use fuel cell technology, as may be coming at Le Mans. But could this change?
  • Meanwhile, Formula E racing, with its all-electric cars, is a (slower, shorter, "whiny" sound) alternative. (Sort of like enlarged radio-controlled cars?) I have not investigated--why is Tesla not involved with Formula E (or maybe it is)? I assume because of the cost.
  • In addition to driving on public roads, what is in store for motor racing in the next 10 to 25 years, vis-à-vis alternative fuels. I don't know, but it should be exciting.
 

Watts_Up

Active Member
Mar 4, 2019
3,110
2,063
In a galaxy far, far away
In addition to driving on public roads,
what is in store for motor racing in the next 10 to 25 years,
vis-à-vis alternative fuels. I don't know, but it should be exciting.
An all-electric car completed the Dakar rally for the first time
The vehicle is equipped with 250 kW synchronous electric motor, equivalent to 340 horsepower
and a modular battery pack made of six lithium battery modules for a total of 150 kWh energy capacity
when using all modules. Acciona previously claimed to be using “Tesla batteries” in their packs.​
 

mblakele

beep! beep! 💉
Mar 7, 2016
1,691
5,296
SF Bay Area
This summer (British) commentators for the 2019 24 hours of Le Mans race discussed hydrogen fuel cell technology (e.g., its likely dominance in upcoming Le Mans racing). They stated something surprising to me: that hydrogen was outpacing plug-in battery technology in the competition to supply alternative-fuel vehicles in Europe. Surprising (or perhaps not), because this seems opposite to the USA situation.

Hmm, I think they're mistaken, or it was a misunderstanding. Maybe they means that hydrogen FCEV technology is doing better in Europe than in the USA? That might be true. Maybe they confused H for Hybrid with H for Hydrogen?

Anyway in both Europe and the US, FCEV numbers are in the thousands while BEV numbers are in the hundreds of thousands. It isn't even close. Here's a report that ends in 2018-Q3, before the Model 3 arrived in Europe. Imagine what it looks like now, with Model 3 sales included....

[Visual Data] Hydrogen cars may be the future - they are not yet the present



According to the most recent sales data from ACEA, BEV was up over 50% for 2019-Q3. I'm not sure if ACEA tracks hydrogen FCEV: they may be under "APV other than electric", a negligible slice of the pie. Or they may all be leases not sales.

Fuel types of new cars: petrol +6.1%, diesel -14.1%, electric +51.8% in third quarter of 2019 | ACEA - European Automobile Manufacturers' Association
 

Lord09

New Member
Jul 20, 2019
4
9
Irvine, CA
Great review, definitely one of the best ones I've read on any car forum. I also had a Clarity PHEV before moving to a Tesla. I agree with most of your non fuel cell related points, it's a great car, but unfortunately it lacks any type of coolness and performance for me at least was just adequate.
 

jkoya

NA2 NSX
Nov 21, 2018
3,626
1,553
Northern CA
Nice review of the Fuel Cell Clarity. Someone close to me has one, as I always see it at the local grocery store and pre-school down the street from me. Still have not seen a Toyota Mirai on the road and I wouldn't think it would be easily missed.
 
  • Funny
Reactions: Watts_Up
Aug 17, 2019
219
152
Mars
@tps5352 . good review! You were quite bold to lease this car with just a single station in the entire city! Normally 2-3 are minimum. As I said elsewhere. with 5 stations per major city, H2 cars will have a bombastic explosion, in number of cars.

But you proved very well that a single station was enough for you to carry on with your normal driving. except for the fuel shortage due to some planning errors by the partnership and an unfortunate accident.

I think Tesla owners/wannabes are most interested in the build quality and refueling times, service quality which has become a concern.
Did you tell them about the fast refueling on your way to anywhere?
How long were you typically on hold before reaching a service person? How easy or difficult was it to get service?
What about the rattles/squeaks/wind noise/road noise etc.? I bet you didn't need a farting app to hide the squeaks. :p

Wow - Never thought there would ever be a Mirai taxi !
A whole fleet of them in Paris too. But how do they get fueled in DC?
 

Watts_Up

Active Member
Mar 4, 2019
3,110
2,063
In a galaxy far, far away
Saw a Toyota fuel cell taxi in DC a year or two ago.
I wonder how the refulling of the Hydrogen Taxi that will be used in Tokyo for the 2020 Olympic Games will be handled?

Olympic taxis make 130-mile round trip to fill up in Swindon

... the hydrogen fuelling station, at Lea Interchange near the Olympic Park, has had to close for security reasons.

The hydrogen-fuelled Hackney cabs are loaded on to a transporter to make the 130-mile round trip to refuel
 

Watts_Up

Active Member
Mar 4, 2019
3,110
2,063
In a galaxy far, far away
I think Tesla owners/wannabes are most interested in the build quality and refueling times, service quality which has become a concern.
Did you tell them about the fast refueling on your way to anywhere?
How long were you typically on hold before reaching a service person? How easy or difficult was it to get service?
There are also several threads dealing with the "Well-to-Wheel" production and energy efficiency between Hydrogen and Battery
 

tps5352

Supporting Member
Oct 30, 2019
324
203
Bay-Delta Region, California, USA
Hmm, I think they're mistaken, or it was a misunderstanding

The data you provide make more sense to me. I probably misunderstood. But it was in the wee hours of the race (I was watching a recorded video), so perhaps they were trying to promote hydrogen? I do recall that they discussed fuel cells (how they work, etc.) for quite awhile (killing time as the fast, gasoline-powered endurance sports cars zoomed by, powerful headlights flashing in the night). I do think they said that a new class of fuel cell-powered racing cars to be allowed by the FIA in 2025 are expected to dominate at Le Mans. Right now, that attention goes to the high-tech Toyota hybrid racers in the top LMP1 (Le Mans Prototype) Class, which are currently winning outright (ahead of all other classes). The hybrid Toyotas, with their strange (to me) aerodynamic body shells, just seem to fly by Porches, Ferraris, Ford GTs, BMWs, Chevrolet Corvettes, Aston Martins, and the rest of the otherwise very quick Le Mans entries. And who knows? The new Le Mans hypercar class coming may someday include all-electric entries like Dendrobium and--dare we say it?--Tesla.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mblakele

jkoya

NA2 NSX
Nov 21, 2018
3,626
1,553
Northern CA
I wonder how the refulling of the Hydrogen Taxi that will be used in Tokyo for the 2020 Olympic Games will be handled?

I read an article in the Nichibei times a while back, that the Energy Ministry of Japan was trying to have about 160 hydrogen fueling stations up and running before the 2020 Olympics. The article mentioned Japan "will deploy 100 hydrogen fuel cell buses during the games, and it wants to have 40,000 fuel cell electric vehicles on the road, with a longer-term goal of 200,000 such vehicles in the next six years". Just read in the NSX forums that Honda has put a hold on their hydrogen platforms...
 
  • Informative
Reactions: JohnSnowNW

Bill25cycle

Member
Mar 31, 2011
103
68
Thank you. Hope my post is informative and entertaining.

Yes, I will certainly examine/drive the Models 3 and Y, which of course were not available in 2016, when I first considered Tesla.

I am also pleased that there are today many new innovative electric vehicles (e.g., pickup trucks, motorcycles, 4x4s) here or arriving soon. However, so far it seems to me that Tesla still remains ahead of the pack on range and overall package.

*****

Some additional random thoughts on the Clarity and Tesla cars:
  • The interior features I like about the Honda Clarity--heated seats, GPS navigation, touch-screen display, rear-facing camera display, etc.--are, of course, available in many other new cars from various manufacturers. Traveling technologically from 1992 (Honda Accord) to 2017 (Honda Clarity) with just one change of cars was fun.
  • Drive-train design--electric motor, to single-speed gearbox, etc.--in the Clarity is similar, I imagine, to that of other electric vehicles (though performance vehicles use two motors, correct?).
  • What sets the Honda Clarity, Toyota Mirai, and Hyundai Nexo apart are their use of fuel cell stacks to chemically/mechanically generate electricity.
  • Coincidentally, hydrogen fuel cell technology was refined in part for road car use just ten miles away from me by the "California Fuel Cell Partnership" (founded 1999; West Sacramento), consisting of a rare collaboration among Daimler-Chrysler, GM, Honda, Hyundai, Nissan, Toyota, and Volkswagen as well as energy-providers and government agencies.
  • Having driven a couple of rental cars recently, it seems like there has been some (regulatory-required?) convergence of control design/placement (e.g., on the steering wheel) among manufacturers, which I applaud.
  • Unstated in my post is that the Honda Clarity and Tesla (Model X) may be stepping stones for me towards an eventual self-driving vehicle. As I age, I appreciate the arrival of this new tech. It is coming at an opportune time (as Baby Boomers age). The Clarity has certain driving aids (e.g., collision avoidance and lane maintenance assistance). I take it that a Tesla will have (many) more. If I live long enough, I hope to see true self-driving cars that can provide safe on-road independence to older folks.
  • Having just read the Model X owner's manual (of course available digitally online) I liken the Tesla to a feature-packed computer on four wheels.
  • This summer (British) commentators for the 2019 24 hours of Le Mans race discussed hydrogen fuel cell technology (e.g., its likely dominance in upcoming Le Mans racing). They stated something surprising to me: that hydrogen was outpacing plug-in battery technology in the competition to supply alternative-fuel vehicles in Europe. Surprising (or perhaps not), because this seems opposite to the USA situation. As long as gasoline goes away (except for hobbyists and racing enthusiasts), I do not care who "wins." In fact, why not a plug-in, fuel cell vehicle (like the new European Mercedes) with a solar-paneled roof?
  • I enjoy Formula 1 Grand Prix racing (on video)--arguably the pinnacle of on-pavement, open-wheel circuit racing. The cars are currently powered by incredibly sophisticated (expensive) 6-cyclinder, turbo-hybrid engines, using both gasoline and electricity. As far as I know, there are no plans to use fuel cell technology, as may be coming at Le Mans. But could this change?
  • Meanwhile, Formula E racing, with its all-electric cars, is a (slower, shorter, "whiny" sound) alternative. (Sort of like enlarged radio-controlled cars?) I have not investigated--why is Tesla not involved with Formula E (or maybe it is)? I assume because of the cost.
  • In addition to driving on public roads, what is in store for motor racing in the next 10 to 25 years, vis-à-vis alternative fuels. I don't know, but it should be exciting.
EXCELLENT Review by an actual Leasee. From where I sit the Honda Clarity Fuel Cell is a serious vehicle, it being much like the now Popular Clarity PHEV (only thing like it now that the volt is gone, with its 47 mile All Electric Range). My main gripe is that even though the Clarity PHEV is the range winner (The BMW I-3 Rex is simply too expensive, and too silly with the 1.7 gallon gasoline range extender) - I wish they'd increase it to 60 miles or so, which is what I typically get with my 2019 Volt (before they discontinued it).

You got a bargain! $10,000 to drive a car for 3 years and ZERO refueling cost? Even though I have solar panels and have one BEV and 2 PHEV's, I cannot begin to match that.

The dicey refueling situation in progressive California of all places is downright shocking. I was aware of the Norway explosion but was unaware of the Santa Clara one. I knew the dispenseries were rickety, but didn't think the rest of the infrastructure was as well....

So be it..… Looks like Hydrogen Fueled cars are going to be even further dead and buried... So much better for Tesla!
 

ZappCatt

Member
Nov 2, 2019
320
263
Santa Clara
Thanks for the excellent review.
I am here in Santa Clara and was looking into the Nexo due to the "free fuel" for 3 years, and the much larger $5,000 state rebate.

Luckily or unfortunately, the stories of the people affected by the explosion and fragility of the hydrogen fuel supply has pushed me away from serious consideration since I am one of those who needs reliable transportation for my 36 mile roundtrip commute to work.
 

jabberwky

Member
Jun 29, 2018
23
10
SF, CA
I have leased Clarity BEV last June. $200/month + $2500 incentive from CA, so I though it was a good deal.
After a few months, I thought it is time to buy EV not a gasoline car. So I bought model X for my wife.
I definitely recommend model X, but if model Y is available I would rather choose model Y for personal reasons.
1. model X is too expensive.
2. I don't like the falcon wing either.
3. X is too big for me, I think Y is the right size
4. model Y would be updated version, probably have improved many things from model X like model 3 did for model S
 

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