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Tesla Insurance offering "autonomous vehicle protection package"

diplomat33

Average guy who loves autonomous vehicles
Aug 3, 2017
8,756
12,443
Terre Haute, IN USA
From the Tesla Insurance page:

What is the Autonomous Vehicle Protection Package?
While we offer numerous additional coverages on top of your base coverage, we also provide an Autonomous Vehicle Protection Package. This package includes Autonomous Vehicle Owner Liability, Wall Charger Coverage, Electronic Key Replacement, and covers Cyber Identity Fraud Expenses.


It says the package includes liability protection. So does it protect the Tesla owner if the car gets into an accident while on FSD Beta?
 
Last edited:

willow_hiller

Active Member
Apr 3, 2019
3,311
17,287
Maryland
This has been in there for some time. I have insurance through Tesla and my agreement from when I got my car about 2 months ago contains this text. They say autonomous means any vehicle with an L2 or above "driver automation system".

Good call. The Internet Archive has that text appear around December 2019: Tesla Insurance
 

willow_hiller

Active Member
Apr 3, 2019
3,311
17,287
Maryland
Found the text of the policy on Reddit, if anyone is curious:

02ef78ty8z141.png


Sounds like Tesla is accepting all liability regardless of whether Autopilot or FSD are engaged, just as long as it's equipped.
 

Daniel in SD

Well-Known Member
Jan 25, 2018
7,350
10,882
San Diego
Sounds like Tesla is accepting all liability regardless of whether Autopilot or FSD are engaged, just as long as it's equipped.
They're not accepting liability, they're insuring the owner's liability. If the liability exceeds the owner's coverage then the owner is still liable for that (just like regular insurance). It's not clear how this is any different from regular liability insurance...
 

t3sl4drvr

Member
Sep 24, 2017
265
359
USA
Are they suggesting regular insurance does not cover this? Because I don’t buy that for a second.

Tesla autonomous vision includes cars driving without driver in the car (robotaxi, drop at door and find parking spot, summon from longer distance).

I am fairly sure my insurance (GEICO) would not cover a crash if car would drive by itself (with no insured driver behind the wheel).

Has anyone tested this with smart summon crashing?
 

glide

Active Member
Jun 6, 2018
4,169
5,853
USA
Tesla autonomous vision includes cars driving without driver in the car (robotaxi, drop at door and find parking spot, summon from longer distance).

I am fairly sure my insurance (GEICO) would not cover a crash if car would drive by itself (with no insured driver behind the wheel).

Has anyone tested this with smart summon crashing?
Ummmmm…that doesn’t exist yet. So why would you pay an insurance carrier for it?
 
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t3sl4drvr

Member
Sep 24, 2017
265
359
USA
Ummmmm…that doesn’t exist yet.

Except for Smart Summon

So why would you pay an insurance carrier for it?

I would not


I believe that the key reason for Tesla to develop insurance product is to prepare for the future where L4/L5 does exist. If they would not have such a product, lack of insurance coverage from anyone might block robotaxis that are essential for delivering the over bloated growth expectations investors have (P/E > 400).

Tesla's urge to have the insurance product on the market now is telling of their optimism for the FSD timeline.
 
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Reactions: dbldwn02
Insurance companies are slowly but surely migrating to next-generation approaches to more accurately determine the risk score of a customer, and LOOP has recently embraced an idea that’s supposed to pioneer a new model many are likely to adopt.

LOOP’s new system relies on an advanced system powered by TomTom maps and whose purpose is to determine if a customer typically drives in an area with an increased likelihood of crashes or not.

Called road risk factor, this idea uses a custom map that highlights the historical flow and the traffic density, with all information provided by TomTom. Using an advanced system that also employs machine learning, LOOP then looks at crash data to determine the dangerous roads and figure out if customers are driving on them.

Driver routes are input into its machine learning model and are referenced against the risk factor of roads driven on. The resulting output of the model is an individual’s risk score, which is computed for each month of the year. This risk score translates to the likelihood an individual driver will experience a crash during the next 30 days, based on their last 30 days of driving,” TomTom explains.

But this isn’t all. LOOP also uses a second concept, this time based on an idea that has already been adopted by others and which employs the mobile device that everybody already has in their pockets.

Using an AI-powered app, LOOP tries to monitor the behavior of drivers behind the wheel, therefore trying to make sure they’re focused on a safe experience. If they’re not, the app suggests all kinds of ways to encourage safer driving, while also recommending routes that avoid the roads with an increased likelihood of crashes.

Just like the rest of driving monitoring apps, LOOP’s implementation looks at things like speeding and harsh braking, eventually generating a score that helps refine the pricing model for each customer.

 

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