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  1. VolkerP

    VolkerP EU Model S P-37

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    2,500 cars, isn't that pathetic. Strong sign that incumbent manufacturers are not about to conquer EV space, they are to be dragged into it. By their, um, ears.
     
  2. slipdrive

    slipdrive Member

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    I always liked the Golf. Since leasing a Polo in Germany during college, and owning a Rabbit and a diesel Golf. How do they compare with others ?range, engine configuration?

    Often have the opportunity to suggest a smaller car to folks who are interested, and who would buy now, rather than wait for five years and a Gen III. I'd go the website, but they usually obscure the facts.
     
  3. 772

    772 Member

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    What's the pricing on this? Some of the comments make it sound like it's priced in the range of the i3 (i guess $45-50k)... that's much more than I'd pay for a golf unless it has a lot of EV range.
     
  4. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

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    #6 Yggdrasill, Feb 27, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2014
    It's priced here between $41,700 and $50,000, compared to the Leaf that's priced between $37,900 and $46,600. (The i3 costs between $41,400 and about $65,000, but only has 4 seats, so it's not really a competitor.)

    Some of the good things about the e-Golf compared to the Leaf is that it has stuff like ACC, heated windscreen, 0,2 kWh larger battery (;)), better looks, more powerful motor, better regen, better interior, 8" screen instead of 7" and a massive following (~5% market share, both in sales and cars currently on the road).

    Currently, some of the downsides is that it is only being delivered with a 3.6 kW charger (the US is supposed to get a 7.2 kW charger, so we might see a better charger here later) and it lacks a heat pump (which will become an option later this year).

    Everyone in the EV world here is expecting Nissan to drop the price on the Leaf somewhat, because for most people the e-Golf seems more attractive. Nissan doesn't have a sterling reputation for customer service and quality, and is only the 5th largest car company here, whereas VW is quite popular and is the largest car company. Nissan wouldn't have to drop the price very much, because Nissan is already overcharging Norwegian customers. If Nissan drops the price to the more normal european prices, it will become attractive again.

    Also, 2500 units seems pessimistic, but the limitation may be battery availaility. Give it a year or two.
     
  5. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

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    I didn't mention how much the regular ICE Golf costs. The cheapest one costs $41,600, and then with more or less equivalent options as a $46,000 e-Golf it can cost well over $60,000.

    Yes, taxes matter.
     
  6. slipdrive

    slipdrive Member

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    Hmmmm. The heat pump on the Golf is optional ? If that is the battery management heat and cool system, then it's really not viable as an option. The lack of active temperature control has been a disaster for the Leaf batteries, leading to premature demise.

    It will be very interesting to see how these various cars really line up together next year, as they come into the U.S. market.
     
  7. 772

    772 Member

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    That's quite expensive for a Leaf here... new ones start around $27-28k before the $7500 tax credit + other state rebates. Wonder what the US pricing will be like, but I suspect that they may have to lower the prices over there at least.
     
  8. ItsNotAboutTheMoney

    ItsNotAboutTheMoney Active Member

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    The Leaf is able to handle the searing heat of Norwegian summers fine, I expect. ;)

    The heat pump is an issue for heating in cold weather. Until they deliver the heat pump, it's not real to me. :p Note that the heat pump doesn't make a difference in extreme cold, so it's not an "enabler" as such, but it helps efficiency when the cold's not extreme.

    The Golf was :D the top seller there, so I think part of the sales are based on familiarity. Easier to move people Golf -> e-Golf -> any BEV.
     
  9. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

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    Nissan is undoubtedly price gouging Norwegian customers. They've been able to get away with it, because there haven't been very many alternatives. Now there is. (Well, they haven't quite been able to get away with it - Norway is actually overflowing with US spec Leafs. You can buy a 2011 Leaf SL with 16000 miles on the odometer for $24,000, and you can get an even better deal if you import it yourself.)
     
  10. ItsNotAboutTheMoney

    ItsNotAboutTheMoney Active Member

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    The other way to look at it is that CA's ZEV requirements force Nissan to lower the price of the US Leaf. US assembly/manufacturing is also likely cheaper than the UK.
     
  11. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

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    If you look at the price in Germany, for instance, it starts at $41,040, but that includes 19% VAT, so the starting price is actually $34,490. That's $3400 less than here. I'm only expecting that Nissan knocks off something like $3000.
     
  12. tftf

    tftf Member

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    #14 tftf, Feb 28, 2014
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2014
    It will be interesting to compare the VW approach vs the local competition (BMW i3) since they both sell in the same price bracket and have similar ranges:

    Will customers prefer a "specially" designed EV like the BMW i3 or an e-Golf that looks like a familiar ICE model (the Golf is more than popular in Germany and other regions, almost iconic as a car model brand)?

    VW seems to be set to use the same design language and production lanes (e-up, e-Golf, more VW brands like Skoda may follow this approach later for EVs) whereas BMW introduced its differentiated "i-series" at great cost.
     
  13. DuncanWatson

    DuncanWatson Member

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    The e-Golf sounds like a fun product. It is good our Norwegian friends are pushing VW into this market. I would love to see it in the US.
     
  14. yobigd20

    yobigd20 Well-Known Member

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  15. djp

    djp Roadster 2.0 VIN939

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    Realistically the Model S active cooling is rarely used in hot climates. It doesn't kick in until the pack reaches 60C, which doesn't happen unless you're on a track on a hot summer day. The main use is for Supercharging. Without active cooling it'll be tough for VW to charge with Level 3 DC.
     

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