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277V New HPWC Installed in Oro Valley, Arizona (North Tucson)

Discussion in 'Charging Standards and Infrastructure' started by CJS2, May 5, 2016.

  1. CJS2

    CJS2 Member

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    Tucson
    Just installed a brand new HPWC and getting 80 Amps at 277 Volts (car reads 79 amps) so charging my
    dual charger 2013 85 at 22KW!!!! Yay!!!

    PM me to get the combo to the lock if you need to charge in North Tucson. Its in an industrial area just off oracle road.

    Jack

    IMG_7684.JPG
     
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  2. rhumbliner

    rhumbliner Member

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    That's a really generous offer. I may look you up on my next trip to Tucson to visit family. Thank you!

    Would you be willing to post that on PlugShare?
     
  3. freds

    freds Member

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    Hmmm, why is the voltage at 277 rather than 240? My location is normal 240, though I have seen 250 now and then.
     
  4. GSP

    GSP Member

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    The new HPWC is rated to work at 277 V. This voltage is available at some commercial sites in North America with three phase power [as is 208 V]. The chargers in the car have always been able to operate at 277 V, but before the new HPWC was released, there was no way to supply the higher voltage to the car.

    GSP
     
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  5. 182RG

    182RG Free The Service Manuals From Tyranny

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  6. K-MTG

    K-MTG Sunshade Captain of TMC

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    How many MPH is that? Is it possible to write that in residential?
     
  7. Cosmacelf

    Cosmacelf Active Member

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    About 66 miles per hour (just multiple kW by 3 for a good rule of thumb). And no, you can't wire that with residential electricity. Only commercial or industrial 3 phase power comes with 277V. At home, you're limited to 240V.
     
  8. nwdiver

    nwdiver Active Member

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    If you REALLY, REALLY wanted slightly faster charging you could get this...

    A 240v/277v 50kVA Transformer. Not sure if a ~15% increase in charging speed is worth ~$2k :confused:
     
  9. TaoJones

    TaoJones Beyond Driven

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    Very kind of you, and 25 miles closer to the nearest SC (Casa Grande) than the first Tucson SC is/will be.

    Rather than registering at PlugShare, you might instead consider having the location appear solely in Tesla's Nav as a destination charger - that way you can control the exact verbiage in the info window *and* also not advertise it to every non-Tesla owner on the planet.

    Or as a first step, having this thread moved to the Arizona owners club page *and* posting at the equivalent page at the Tesla.com forums area might get the most targeted traffic.
     
  10. eladts

    eladts Member

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    The J1772 standard does not support 277V. Therefore non-Tesla vehicles cannot use this charger anyway, even with some hacked Telsa to J1772 adapter.
     
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  11. araxara

    araxara S-P85#3,218 X-90D#3,299

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    Actually you can get a Buck/Boost converter for about $300 that will do this. I bought a newish one from eBay for $100, but haven't installed it. It turns out the newer car's chargers (such as in my Model X) are kW limited so they reduce the current when the voltage goes up. The older Model Ss, as in the OP's picture, don't seem to care or at least they don't seem to reduce the current by much.

    I've actually charged on that Oro Valley charger with my older Model S with no problems. I've only successfully charged once there with my Model X. The second time the car would start to charge and then complain about the charger. The voltage also started out at about 280V, so that could be the problem.

    As an aside, that charger is currently down. It will be moved to another building near the same complex.
     
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