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Advice on Driving New M3 Home and Charging

Discussion in 'Model 3: Battery & Charging' started by PianoAl, Dec 28, 2019.

  1. PianoAl

    PianoAl Member

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    I posted a similar thread in the Driving Dynamics subforum by mistake.

    I'll be picking up our new M3 with the long-range option in Rocklin, CA and driving it home to Trinidad, CA. The longest stretch is 188 miles from the supercharger in Red Bluff, CA to home.

    Screen Shot 2019-12-28 at 3.02.33 PM.jpg

    I assume that won't be a problem. Anything I need to know ahead of time (for my first time charging)?

    I could go the longer way and hit a supercharger in Eureka (156 miles).

    Thanks!
     
  2. Chisale

    Chisale Member

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    So 36 must be a really windy road and that's why the time of transit is almost 30 minutes longer for the same distance? What's the expected temperature for the trip. If it's going to be cold just wear a fleece jacket and keep the heater turned to 64 or 65. Just enough to keep fog off the windows. I'm guessing it could be cold island but warm up as you get near home and the coast. Honestly, I think you'll be fine going the quicker route. Just don't go too fast on I-5. Maybe keep it to 70mph or a little less.
    Have your Energy Consumption screen pulled up and keep checking the charge at destination. Ask at the pick up appointment if you're not sure how to do this. Just to put your mind at ease you might look up on plugshare.com about whether there are 3rd party chargers or Tesla destination chargers along this route. I would try to charge to near full at Red Bluff if I were you, again just to put your mind at ease. The worst range that I ever had on my AWD LR was about 200 miles and that was with a 50 mph headwind the entire way and in cold weather.
     
  3. postersw

    postersw Member

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    Based on my experience this month, a conservative estimate this time of year is 70% of rated range, so about 200 miles for your LR AWD.
    But - those routes look like they are through the mountains, and you should plan on losing 8 miles of range for every 1000 feet in elevation gain - i.e. going over a 2000' pass will take an additional 16 miles of range. (You will lose that on the way up, but get some of it back on the way back down).

    So my advice would be similar to others:
    1. Make sure you are charged to 100% before you leave (which means a long charge in Red Bluff).
    2. Drive under 65 mph.
    3. Keep the heat under 70 deg (the lower the better).
    4. Make sure Brake Regeneration is set to 'standard' so you get back some of the energy you lose going up in the mountains.
    5. Never assume that 188 miles won't be a problem. It will be a problem if you hit bad weather, or a traffic jam or accident, or a detour, or drive above 70, or keep the heat cranked up, or have a lot of elevation gain.
     
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  4. Chisale

    Chisale Member

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    One more tip I thought to include. When you supercharge in Red Bluff be prepared to drive home right away when charging is complete. Especially if it's cold there that day. Your battery will warmed up and more efficient than if you charge and then let the car sit while having a leisurely dinner. It doesn't mean you have to drive straight home the entire 188 miles without a bathroom break. But take advantage of that warm battery after charging.
     
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  5. DR61

    DR61 Member

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    In addition to the excellent tips above, consider stopping for a break+meal at one of the J1772 charging stations along 299. On the PlugShare app I see one at the Willow Creek China Flat (Bigfoot) Museum. Also there is one at Del Lima RV Park between Weaverville and Willow Creek. Others are available nearer the coast. Adding 20-30 miles might make a big difference.

    Should be a fun drive from Redding to the coast if weather is OK.
     
  6. joebruin77

    joebruin77 Member

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    I would visit and check your route plan on this website:

    abetterrouteplanner.com

    Make sure all of the data you entered is as accurate as possible, esp the temperature outside. As long as the data you enter is accurate, I have found abetterroutepalnner.com to be very accuarte.

    Before you leave, I would make sure the air pressure in your tires are at or slightly above the recommended PSI. I keep a bicycle air pump in my trunk in case I need to add some air. Low tire pressure can significantly reduce your range.
     
  7. AlanSubie4Life

    AlanSubie4Life Efficiency Obsessed Member

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    If the conditions are dry, this 188 miles should not be a problem in an AWD with aero wheels, even if you run the heat. You’ll be traveling relatively slowly on that road which helps with loss. And there is ~zero net elevation gain. You’ll be in the midst of your trip then, so use the in-car trip planner (hopefully it will choose this route...) and charge enough at the Supercharger to ensure 20%+ upon arrival (it will tell you what it expects). Then drive fast and furious, blasting the heat, while keeping a very close eye on the estimated charge upon arrival, making sure it stays above 10-15% at all times. If it looks like you are consistently losing estimated arrival charge to the point of being worrisome, you may need to dial back the heat or tuck behind another vehicle. But the whole idea is to charge sufficiently high at the Supercharger to avoid such nonsense.
     
  8. house9

    house9 Supporting Member

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    Is it true that using the heated seats uses less charge then using the heater?
     
  9. AlanSubie4Life

    AlanSubie4Life Efficiency Obsessed Member

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    Yes. The seat heaters are less than 100W each and the heater can use 7kW or so (though steady-state at 40 degrees outside it might be more like 2-3kW).
     
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  10. augkuo

    augkuo Member

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    The model3 doesn’t come with a 14-50 plug any more with the mobile charger so spend the extra bucks for it - you’re in a remote location so there are probably more RV camp sites than public EV stations so it’ll be a good investment.

    188 miles shouldn’t be a problem - charge to 270 and don’t go over 70 mph and you’ll be fine. You can keep track of your range based upon your driving habits/headwind/etc with the energy app - it’ll show your actual range with the average energy usage over the last 5 or 30 miles.
     
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  11. eprosenx

    eprosenx Active Member

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    Charge to 100% at red bluff, keep the speed down a bit on I-5, don’t crank the heater absurdly high, do use the seat heaters as is comfortable, but don’t make yourself uncomfortable to do it.

    I would buy the 14-50 adapter for the UMC from Tesla at the service center as that will allow you to charge in an emergency at just about any RV park. Make sure that the car has the included J-772 adapter in it at pickup along with the UMC cord.

    Download the “PlugShare” app and scope out what emergency charging stops might be available to you along the route. It looks like there are a couple J1772 stations in McKinleyville that could be bail out locations right at the end of the trip.

    You are going going to be fine! Don’t over think it. Watch the consumption on the energy monitor graph during the drive. You will lose a ton of range going uphill, but you will gain much of that back going down hill. This is a good opportunity for you to gain confidence in the car. I presume you will do this drive in the future fairly often.

    Make sure to enjoy the car!!!
     
  12. focher

    focher Member

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    You can also search out destination chargers. These are usually at hotels, and I suspect easily accessible even if you aren’t a guest.
     
  13. PianoAl

    PianoAl Member

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    UPDATE: I charged to 95% in Red Bluff, and it predicted I'd get home with 37%. I got home with 27%. Trip went great.
     
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  14. eprosenx

    eprosenx Active Member

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    Fantastic! Easy peasy!

    Enjoy the car!
     
  15. Rottenapplr

    Rottenapplr Member

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    If in doubt charge to 90% to 100%. I’ve taken my car long distance before, much longer than 188 miles.
     
  16. AlanSubie4Life

    AlanSubie4Life Efficiency Obsessed Member

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    #16 AlanSubie4Life, Dec 31, 2019
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2019
    Glad it worked well for you. Be sure to follow the same strategy on future road trips - charge about 10% above the level that the navigation tells you will get you there “comfortably,” in your mind. So if a comfortable arrival charge for you is 10%, charge to an arrival charge of about 20%. This will give you margin and you won’t have to reduce speed.
     
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  17. Rottenapplr

    Rottenapplr Member

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    Especially if there are no superchargers nearby. I can get away with cutting it close when traveling on the 5 highway between Sacramento and LA. There’s tons or chargers but on more remote trips I usually add 5 mins to any supercharging session. For example if it says I can continue my trip after 20 mins or charging, I’ll leave the charger at 25 mins. Leaves me a buffer for emergencies.
     
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  18. linuxguyInMD

    linuxguyInMD Member

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    plugshare shows lots of chargers as you hit route 5
     

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