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Can Tesla wall charger be used with some adaptors to Charge other EV's/Prius Plug In?

Trying to decide between going with NEMA 1450 outlet OR having Tesla wall charger installed. As per my electrician, installation charges for both are the same ( plus buying the wall charger)
My understanding of the benefit of NEMA 1450 is that it is more generic and be used to charge other EV's too? If I end up installing a Tesla wall charger, is there any adaptor that can be used to Charger other EV's / Prius Plug in?
 

jcanoe

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Oct 2, 2020
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Maryland
The benefit of the NEMA 14-50 receptacle is that you can replace or upgrade the equipment in the future without requiring an electrician to install the new charging equipment. The NEMA 14-50 receptacle is not designed for regular plugging and unplugging of the power plug as this will loosen the connection with the plug.

What you can use is a Tesla to SAE J1772 adapter such as this one:

https://www.amazon.com/Lectron-Tesla-Charger-J1772-Adapter/
 
It's not so much that the receptacle is more compatible with other EVs, it's the EVSE (aka, "charger") options for the 240v/40a spec (either an N6-50 or N14-50) has dozens of J1772 spec/non-Tesla specific options (I guess that's sort of toe-may-toe / toe-mah-toe ... :D)

FWIW, we went with an N6-50, it's a slightly simpler install (3-wire vs. 4-wire) and the primary advantage of a 14-50 is two-phase power so it can provide both 120 and 240 through the same connector - which is why it's popular at RV parks (RV often have the need for both voltages).

One nice advantage to using a plug-in type EVSE, (like @jcanoe pointed out) is the ability to quickly and easily swap it out. We have a Grizzl-E Smart (40a), it does double duty between our Tesla and our Wrangler 4xe (PHEV), with just an easy adapter swap (that's supplied with the Tesla).

The other thing you might think about if you want a backup: the included Tesla Mobile Connector (TMC) supports up to 32a @ 240v on a 6-50/14-50, you just need the appropriate adapter here:

https://shop.tesla.com/prod...

I picked up the 6-50 to match our 50a plug, and for only $45, it's nice to know we have a second charger on hand if the Grizzl-E was to crap out and need to be replaced, plus it's more much portable, I also have an N14-30 (30a "dryer plug") adapter, so when we hit our BIL's place I have a decent charging option.
 
Check with your electric utility, too. Ours has an off-peak charging program that required a dedicated clipper creek charger. Same cost as the Tesla but I get the off-peak savings.

The biggest part is having the 50A service run to your garage. After that swapping out a wall connector is fairly trivial. The Tesla connector is nice and has the handy button that opens up the charge port, but if you ever get another brand of EV/PHEV you'll need to either get an adapter like @jcanoe describes or get a different charger. All things being equal, I'd probably get a 'generic' charger and a J1772-Tesla adapter. Looking at prices, the Tesla chargers are actually cheaper than most comparable generic chargers so you can go with that and deal with an adapter in the future should you need to.
 
Thank you both. Makes sense. What I understand is that by installing NEMA1450, you have more options like just plug in EVSE like Juicebox, GrizzlE etc and use the adaptor to charge.
Cant find the charge rate on a Grizll E 40 Amp for a Model Y other than something generic like25 to 35 miles per hour?
 
Thank you both. Makes sense. What I understand is that by installing NEMA1450, you have more options like just plug in EVSE like Juicebox, GrizzlE etc and use the adaptor to charge.
Cant find the charge rate on a Grizll E 40 Amp for a Model Y other than something generic like25 to 35 miles per hour?
All of these chargers essentially provide AC current to the car. You should also note that they typically operate at 80% of rated capacity, so a 50A charger will run at 40A and a 40A charger will actually run at 32A. Beyond that, there should be very little difference between chargers at a given current.

Tesla has a chart with estimated charging speeds here.
 
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jcanoe

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Oct 2, 2020
5,302
5,765
Maryland
Thank you both. Makes sense. What I understand is that by installing NEMA1450, you have more options like just plug in EVSE like Juicebox, GrizzlE etc and use the adaptor to charge.
Cant find the charge rate on a Grizll E 40 Amp for a Model Y other than something generic like25 to 35 miles per hour?
Just use the Tesla Model Y estimate. The GrizzlE 40 amp enables charging at 240V and 40A, just like the Tesla Wall Connector when used on a 50A circuit.

50A circuit / maximum 40A charging amperage / 9.6kW / up to 36 miles per hour of range added while charging
 
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Thanks. Got it.

Given that there is 30% federal rebate till Jan 31st, any recommendations? Saw a good review on insideevees on Grizzl E Classic. Currently there is $40 off, it will be $399. Not sure I need the Smart version with wireless etc. Also it is out of stock and can't be ordered
 

Ron J.

MY LR, Blue-Bk, 19"wh.. no tow, no FSD- OD 9/30/21
Nov 20, 2021
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Fort Myers, FL
I also wanted to be able to handle a Tesla and a plug-in hybrid (with a J1772 connector) using the same wall charger. The choice was either use a Tesla wall charger with a tesla-to-J1772 adapter (about $160) or using another brand of wall charger with a J1772 connector then using a J1772-to-Tesla adapter (included with every Tesla or $50 if you want an extra one). The Tesla wall charger can charge at a max. rate of 48 amps when hard wired to a 60 amp circuit or charge at 40 amps when plugged into a 50 amp circuit (ie., using a 14-50 or a 6-50 plug). I ended up going with a ChargePoint Home Flex charger that I have hardwired to a 60 amp circuit and can charge as the same 48 amp rate as the Tesla wall charger (i.e., when hardwired to a 60 amp circuit). The ChargePoint Home Flex costs about $150 more than the Tesla wall charger but doesn't need the $160 Tesla-to-J1772 adapter. Thus the total cost is about the same going either route. Note the ChargePoint Home Flex comes with the plug-in cord (either 14-50 or 6-50) and can be plugged in which limits the charging rate to 40 amps when used on a 50 amp circuit.

Except when taking trips, my wife and I each average only about 100 miles per week on each of our vehicles so I will typically only need to plug in the Tesla every couple of weeks. On the other hand the plug-in hybrid will need to be plugged in 2 or 3 times per week. This was one factor for me deciding to use a J1772 charger since it can be used without an adapter for the vehicle that will most frequently need to be charged.
 
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jcanoe

Well-Known Member
Oct 2, 2020
5,302
5,765
Maryland
I also wanted to be able to handle a Tesla and a plug-in hybrid (with a J1772 connector) using the same wall charger. The choice was either use a Tesla wall charger with a tesla-to-J1772 adapter (about $160) or using another brand of wall charger with a J1772 connector then using a J1772-to-Tesla adapter (included with every Tesla or $50 if you want an extra one). The Tesla wall charger can charge at a max. rate of 48 amps when hard wired to a 60 amp circuit or charge at 40 amps when plugged into a 50 amp circuit (ie., using a 14-50 or a 6-50 plug). I ended up going with a ChargePoint Home Flex charger that I have hardwired to a 60 amp circuit and can charge as the same 48 amp rate as the Tesla wall charger (i.e., when hardwired to a 60 amp circuit). The ChargePoint Home Flex costs about $150 more than the Tesla wall charger but doesn't need the $160 Tesla-to-J1772 adapter. Thus the total cost is about the same going either route. Note the ChargePoint Home Flex comes with the plug-in cord (either 14-50 or 6-50) and can be plugged in which limits the charging rate to 40 amps when used on a 50 amp circuit.

Except when taking trips, my wife and I each average only about 100 miles per week on each of our vehicles so I will typically only need to plug in the Tesla every couple of weeks. On the other hand the plug-in hybrid will need to be plugged in 2 or 3 times per week. This was one factor for me deciding to use a J1772 charger since it can be used without an adapter for the vehicle that will most frequently need to be charged.
Unlike the Chargepoint Home Flex the Tesla Wall Connector does not come with a power plug option for either 6-50 or 14-50. As Tesla does not provide or specify a power plug for the Wall Connector adding a power plug would not be code compliant.

You may find that your Tesla Model Y uses more energy than indicated by your 100 mile per week driving due to Climate control, Cabin Overheat Protection and Sentry mode. You don't necessarily need to charge every day; try and keep the battery state of charge (SOC) between 50% and 80%, not more than 90% for the long term health of the battery.
 

jcanoe

Well-Known Member
Oct 2, 2020
5,302
5,765
Maryland
Thank you all, ordered the grizzle-e and the electrician will put a NEMA 1450 to plug it in.

Considering any future upgrades etc. should I ask for a 60 amp breaker or anything specific like that?
You could ask the electrician to wire the circuit for 60A but the circuit breaker must remain 50A to be compliant with code, match the rating of the 14-50 receptacle. In the future you could remove the 14-50 receptacle, change the breaker to 60A and use the Tesla Wall Connector on the 60A circuit to be able to charge at up to 48A. In practice the 40A charging rate of the GrizzlE when used on a 50A circuit should be more than adequate for most home charging needs.
 
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You could ask the electrician to wire the circuit for 60A but the circuit breaker must remain 50A to be compliant with code, match the rating of the 14-50 receptacle. In the future you could remove the 14-50 receptacle, change the breaker to 60A and use the Tesla Wall Connector on the 60A circuit to be able to charge at up to 48A. In practice the 40A charging rate of the GrizzlE when used on a 50A circuit should be more than adequate for most home charging needs.
Given the holiday schedule and the need to complete it by Dec31st, I guess will have to go with a typical NEMA 1450 install. I was asking the electrician what brans he uses ( as I read here to avoid Levitron and go with Bryant or Hubbell), He says he uses Eaton. Couldn't find good or bad about Eaton. Any thoughts
 

jcanoe

Well-Known Member
Oct 2, 2020
5,302
5,765
Maryland
Given the holiday schedule and the need to complete it by Dec31st, I guess will have to go with a typical NEMA 1450 install. I was asking the electrician what brans he uses ( as I read here to avoid Levitron and go with Bryant or Hubbell), He says he uses Eaton. Couldn't find good or bad about Eaton. Any thoughts
If installed properly, i.e. correct torque applied to the wiring terminations should be OK. 14-50 receptacles are not designed for regular plugging and unplugging so best if you leave the GrizzlE EVSE plugged in.
 

jcanoe

Well-Known Member
Oct 2, 2020
5,302
5,765
Maryland
One electrician says they always use Eaton brand and another person uses Legrand. Are they all Ok? or should insist for Bryant or Hubbell which should add $100 additional to the cost
I have not read any reviews, positive or negative, about Eaton or Legrand receptacles.

Hubbell and Bryant are now the same company.

NEMA 14-50 Receptacles:

Hubbell 9450a: $85 US
Bryant 9450fr: $40 US
Cooper 5754n: $50 US

You could ask the electrician to use the Bryant receptacle part number 9450fr, it only costs $40 (price may have changed.)

Avoid using the less expensive Leviton NEMA 14-50 part number 279-S00 for an EV charging circuit.

Once you get away from installing the least expensive, i.e. lower quality construction receptacle what matters next is that the receptacle is properly installed, i.e. the wiring is properly terminated and torqued to the correct specification so all of the wire connections stay tight. Turn off the circuit breaker before plugging in the charging equipment into the 14-50 receptacle. Leave the charging equipment, i.e. GrizzlE plugged in. All should be good.
 
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Thanks. I can go get Bryant locally here.

Two electricians I was talking to are not licensed:rolleyes:. They are all part of come company and will give a receipt for the work they do etc.
As per them, if you are pulling a permit for electric work then only there is a mandatory need to have licenses. Both of them come with great reviews etc and have done lots of electrical work. I guess I am not sure to use them at this point?
 

jcanoe

Well-Known Member
Oct 2, 2020
5,302
5,765
Maryland
Thanks. I can go get Bryant locally here.

Two electricians I was talking to are not licensed:rolleyes:. They are all part of come company and will give a receipt for the work they do etc.
As per them, if you are pulling a permit for electric work then only there is a mandatory need to have licenses. Both of them come with great reviews etc and have done lots of electrical work. I guess I am not sure to use them at this point?
I believe it depends on the local building regulations. In some local jurisdictions for certain types of construction, electrical work the homeowner can request the permit, perform the work and all that is required is passing the needed inspection(s). In other cases, not.
 
We don't need a permit to install NEMA 1450.

Given that you don't need a get& maintain a license for this kind of electrical work at home, sounds to me that it is Ok to use a non licensed electrician. However, even a remote possibility of something going wrong like fire etc and possibility of everyone asking the home owner did you use a licensed electrician etc makes me think to use a licensed electrician?🤨
 
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