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How does the Model 3's PMSR Motor generate current during regen?

Discussion in 'Model 3: Driving Dynamics' started by VT_EE, Aug 6, 2018.

  1. VT_EE

    VT_EE Member

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    The rotor in a switched reluctance motor is just a piece of metal with no magnets so it doesn't produce current during regen like a traditional PM motor does. There is no rotating magnetic field. Rumor has it that the PMs in the Model 3 motor are imbedded in the stator between the poles (again, no rotating field). In the absence of a rotating magnetic field, how does this motor work during regen? Please educate me.:)

    I've attached a link to decent article explaining how a switched reluctance motor works.

    Tesla Model 3 Motor — Everything I've Been Able To Learn About It (Welcome To The Machine) | CleanTechnica
     
  2. BioSehnsucht

    BioSehnsucht Model 3 LR

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  3. okashira

    okashira Member

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    The motor is an IPM style just like Nissan leaf and what the Prius has had for almost two decades. There is nothing really special about the design. Tesla marketing. :)
    Even Milwaukee power tools use IPM motors these days.
     
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  4. BioSehnsucht

    BioSehnsucht Model 3 LR

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    The motor, or at least the motor controller, certainly has some special sauce. But I suspect the basic construction is basically an IPM design, with perhaps some clever geometry and cleverer controller software.

    Certainly much ado was made about how nobody has made a usable PMSRM motor for EV purposes due to the various downsides, and if everyone figures it out they'll all switch to it from regular PM motors (Tesla being the only or almost only company using induction motors).
     
  5. VT_EE

    VT_EE Member

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    I don't see the rotor in that picture. The disc leaning on the stator in the picture is not the rotor, which should be along cylinder with a similar length to the stator.
     
  6. Swampgator

    Swampgator Member

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    This will help you. Very detailed explanation of how a SRPM machine works.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. GregRF

    GregRF Squirrel Power

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    ACTUAL-Rotor-close-up-with-laminates-3.jpg
     
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  8. BestHand

    BestHand Member

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    I do not trust this article, I can not see how permanent magnets in a stator can help with anything for brushless motor, it does not make any sense. I believe that PM are embedded in the rotor.
     
  9. Swampgator

    Swampgator Member

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    Picture above confirms they are in the rotor.
     
  10. BioSehnsucht

    BioSehnsucht Model 3 LR

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    Seems the pic I found originally wasn't even the Model 3 motor then. Perhaps it was a Tesla induction motor?
     
  11. VT_EE

    VT_EE Member

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  12. GregRF

    GregRF Squirrel Power

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    I believe they had some "comparable" motors on display next to the 3 teardown. Not sure which one that is, one of the other pictures had a Bolt motor.
     
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