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How to tell build date of PW v 2.1?

h2ofun

Active Member
Aug 11, 2020
2,905
550
auburn, ca
Since it seems the PW's with v2.1 have been installed before Nov 2020, the next question that maybe more important is how do we determine the build date?

So, I guess the next step is to compared PN and SN's. Lets see if we have different PN's for V2.1 and a SN change.

Here is mine.

pwv.jpg
 

MorrisonHiker

S 100D 2021.24.5
Mar 8, 2015
10,110
9,601
Colorado
Our referral Powerwalls were installed in 2018 and 2019 and end in 13-F (unsigned) and 33-B, 33-F and 33-F (all signed).

The two ending in 33-F were installed in July 2018 along with another Powerwall which was eventually swapped to the 13-F Powerwall. The 33-B Powerwall was installed in September 2019.
 

h2ofun

Active Member
Aug 11, 2020
2,905
550
auburn, ca
Man, I am confused. Just spent an hour with PW tesla support. They have been great.

The only way to find when your PW was MFG is to call them. Mine were made in Jan 30th, 2021

BUT, we then talked about the next FW update. She said they check the PW before sending. In my case, they have and reviewed the install drawings and
said everything was fine. She did say that if someone puts in 40amp breaker they will tell the installer to fix and put a 30 in.

She told me that basically everyone wired to spec will get the FW update, and said it will give new PW 2 plus capability. I asked why Elon stated since Nov and she had no good answer. I then asked about the spec. For a 5KW output, at 240 volts, that 20 amps. For 7.5kw at 240, that 31.25. She went back to check about this and we got disconnected. My next question was well I guess there is steady state and instantaneous. So, I have not heard the steady state is going up, or did I miss this? Because maybe, and over my head, a 30 amp set can take a instantaneous 7.5KW without blowing the breaker?

She said they have been asked when the new FW is coming out, and they do not know, and even if they did, could not say.

So in a lot of ways, am now totally confused as to what the specs for the Powerwall 2 plus are, and they are telling me the existing wiring works, whatever that means.

So anyone else have any more info. Sure seems the v2.1 may mean nothing since cannot get anyone to say what changed, when, etc.
 

wwhitney

Member
Nov 2, 2017
965
1,310
Berkeley, CA
My next question was well I guess there is steady state and instantaneous. So, I have not heard the steady state is going up, or did I miss this? Because maybe, and over my head, a 30 amp set can take a instantaneous 7.5KW without blowing the breaker?
Yes, definitely. All motors, for example, have a starting surge current much higher than their steady state current (a factor of 6 to 10 typically). So breakers are designed to trip quickly at very high current, and more slowly at lower multiples of their rating.

You can look at an example of a breaker trip curve in, say, page 2 of this document:


Say you had a 30A breaker that follows this curve. If I look at the 100s line, I see the graph specifies a tripping current of 1.4x to 2x. Meaning that the breaker is supposed to take longer than 100s to trip when the load is 40A, and is supposed to take no more than 100s to trip when the load is 60A.

Of course, that graph is just an example, the manufacturer of a particular breaker should have a more specific document with the trip curves for that breaker. The listing standard for breakers, UL 489, probably provides upper and lower bands for breaker trip curves, and that document may be using those bounds, I didn't look at it closely to see.

Cheers, Wayne
 

h2ofun

Active Member
Aug 11, 2020
2,905
550
auburn, ca
Yes, definitely. All motors, for example, have a starting surge current much higher than their steady state current (a factor of 6 to 10 typically). So breakers are designed to trip quickly at very high current, and more slowly at lower multiples of their rating.

You can look at an example of a breaker trip curve in, say, page 2 of this document:


Say you had a 30A breaker that follows this curve. If I look at the 100s line, I see the graph specifies a tripping current of 1.4x to 2x. Meaning that the breaker is supposed to take longer than 100s to trip when the load is 40A, and is supposed to take no more than 100s to trip when the load is 60A.

Of course, that graph is just an example, the manufacturer of a particular breaker should have a more specific document with the trip curves for that breaker. The listing standard for breakers, UL 489, probably provides upper and lower bands for breaker trip curves, and that document may be using those bounds, I didn't look at it closely to see.

Cheers, Wayne
Okay, seems like this could all make sense. assuming the PW's output steady state stays at 5kw.

But the piece that so far is making no sense is why Elon said units made starting Nov will be called Powerwall 2 plus.
 

woferry

Member
Mar 4, 2019
406
478
San Jose, CA
It's most common in my experience of manufacturing that the serial number contains the date, typically in a YYWW format, i.e. last 2 digits of year and a 2 digit week code. For example, my PW delivered January 2019's S/N is TG11833...., where the 1833 would make sense as the date code (August 2018). I've seen several other PW2/PW2.1 labels that all seem consistent with that. So based on the picture at the top my guess would be that unit was manufactured week 29 of 2020 (mid-July). Similarly the various v2 tiles I took pictures of during my install all showed serials containing 1903 - 1906, which was a few weeks before they'd been delivered to my site for installation. Though from a different manufacturer obviously, the Delta Solivias Tesla installed had a line clearly marking their date codes (1830 and 1836), but that code is also right in the serial number on each one. My GW1 was TG11804..., suggesting it was a bit older than the rest of the items.
 

Mark_T

Active Member
Nov 1, 2017
1,305
1,131
UK
Reported elsewhere that Tesla use YYDDD format for the manufacturing date...

So this one:
Screenshot_2021-05-11 How to tell build date of PW v 2 1 .png


Would be 2020 day 294 which is October 20th, 2020.
 

evmusic

Member
May 22, 2018
27
13
FL
I am sure you all know by now how to recognize if the PW2 has that +.

TPN: 3012170-05-B = this is the new part number for PW+
TSN: TG120300 = The model year is after TG1 (20 or 21) and the following three digit show which date of the year is produced. If the number is bigger than 300 of the model year 20 than it is Powerwall+.
I hope it helps.
 

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