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Installing aftermarket sub/amp power questions

You could use the factory sub wires as high level inputs to an amp, though I would recommend a DSP or some kind of correction device to fix the signal and counteract the roll off. Maybe ignorance is bliss, but I've had close to 1200w (750w sub amp + 400w front stage amp) running on the stock single 12v battery for over a year. I did finally replace the original 12v battery early this year, but it was 5 years old.
 
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You could use the factory sub wires as high level inputs to an amp, though I would recommend a DSP or some kind of correction device to fix the signal and counteract the roll off. Maybe ignorance is bliss, but I've had close to 1200w (750w sub amp + 400w front stage amp) running on the stock single 12v battery for over a year. I did finally replace the original 12v battery early this year, but it was 5 years old.

good to hear, I have a 1800w although the gain wont be very high
 
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Where did you guys attach the power for the amp by the 12V lead acid battery? The 12V battery has the usual positive and negative terminals, but there looks to be a fuse on the positive terminal connector. Do you know what is the rating for that fuse? Did you connect the amp to the battery side of the positive terminal fuse, or the other side (away from battery) of that fuse?
 

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I'd put a terminal on the right post directly to the battery. The rating of the fuse is immaterial since you won't be connecting anything for the stereo to that circuit.
For a temporary load, the fuse doesn’t matter. But if the load is sustained, then the DCDC charger will kick in to put charge back into the battery and it may overload that fuse. It would be useful to know what is the rating of that fuse.
 
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For a temporary load, the fuse doesn’t matter. But if the load is sustained, then the DCDC charger will kick in to put charge back into the battery and it may overload that fuse. It would be useful to know what is the rating of that fuse.
The DC/DC converter would not be able to blow up the fuse. The biggest risk is putting a load on the 12v system that is so high for a sustained period that you kill the 12v battery because the DC/DC converter cannot keep up for such a long time.
 
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The DC/DC converter would not be able to blow up the fuse. The biggest risk is putting a load on the 12v system that is so high for a sustained period that you kill the 12v battery because the DC/DC converter cannot keep up for such a long time.

So how are people connecting their aftermarket amp/sub combo to their front battery? Is there a power limitation of what kind of amp is good and wont throw codes? My car audio shop has mentioned this is the only way they install their aftermarket sub/amp's into model 3's.
 
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