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  • The final cut of TMC Podcast #34 is available now with topics timestamped. We covered Tesla's rollercoaster prices, Toyota pushing junk science, Mike's new Model 3, Optimizing track mode for snow driving, FSD V11 apparently coming by the end of this week, and more. You can watch and check out the chat replay on YouTube.

Interesting conversation atStanford

Martin

Tesla Founder
Aug 17, 2007
76
0
I thought you guys might like reading the many threads of conversation about a talk I gave at Stanford last week. I gave a 45-minute talk at their Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Seminar, followed by a long Q & A session. This was a new talk, integrating a pictorial history of Tesla Motors with a list of lessons I have learned as founder of Tesla Motors. Speaking to a mixed group of mostly engineering students and business school students, here are the lessons I presented:

  • Do Something Meaningful
  • Be Bold
  • Think Your Idea Through
  • Build Your Company Too
  • Face Reality
  • Hire the Best People
  • Aggressively Follow All Leads

Here is the link to the conversation: http://etl-forums.stanford.edu/viewforum.php?id=25

If you poke around the Standford ETL site, I think you can find a recording and video of the talk, but I don't think they caught my slides.
 
I was amused by the comments about the Lotus Elise door sills. Most Elise owners develop a special technique for getting into the car.

Entry%20Technique.jpg
 

danny

TMCing Since 2006
Administrator
Aug 15, 2006
2,123
1,424
California
Remember that is supposedly tracktion limited, so that if they put on bigger, wider tires in the future for a track version perhaps then you could get even better times although those bigger wider tires/wheels would possibly weigh more increasing unsprung weight.
 

TEG

Teslafanatic
Moderator
Aug 20, 2006
22,074
9,429
Sometimes traction controls and/or limits of tire adhesion are the "safety valve" to keep other drive-line components from breaking. If you put on bigger, wider, sticker tires it is possible you could over-stress the transmission and break something there. Just something to keep in mind when considering untested mods.
 
I recently had the pleasure of meeting and chatting at length with a Tesla engineer. He indicated that the car is not traction limited on a good road surface. The car will launch at a consistent .8 Gs and did the 3.86 time with traction control on. They were still refining the firmware to optimize it for the new transmission. He felt that they would reach 3.74 with traction control off. This is due to the fact that the traction control is set up to be somewhat conservative.

He also said the optimum shift point is 52 mph and expected 1/4 mile times are mid to high 12s. These performance numbers are pretty much set by battery pack limits. To beat this by any amount a full or partial sport battery pack will be needed. A sport pack would consist of higher discharge rate, lower energy density cells resulting in greater performance and shorter range.
 
I had been somewhat concerned that the 1/4 mile time might be hurt a bit more than that because raw horsepower has more effect once past 60 mph. I figured the limit was the battery pack. I was somewhat surprised by the almost casual mention of a sport battery pack. Sounded almost like it was a given.

I don't personally plan on testing the 1/4 mile time much but I do know a few motor heads who hold nothing but contempt at the thought of an electric car and a good number sure doesn't hurt.

I was also somewhat surprised how adamant he was that the car was not at all traction limited. I thought more about that and figured that it was most likely due to the smooth consistent torque of the electric drive. No abrupt surge of torque as a high powered ICE enters its power band. So it also sounds like not much burning rubber after all.
 

TEG

Teslafanatic
Moderator
Aug 20, 2006
22,074
9,429
Yes, when I was first witness to EP1 tearing it up in a parking lot I was pleased to see how little drama was involved. I think perhaps that one aspect of the roadster is likely to get a lot of notice from "weekend warriors". You can "raise hell" without drawing too much attention.
 

WarpedOne

Supreme Premier
Supporting Member
Aug 17, 2006
4,511
8,791
Slovenia, Europe
He felt that they would reach 3.74 with traction control off.

Woohoo, those are some serious numbers now!

Especially because practicaly everyone will be able to reach it at their own stop lights. No equisite clutching and reving needed, just floor it. Your grandma can do it to!

Hehe, this could be some funny commercial. A seasond driver in a Ferrari getting beaten by an old lady with glases and gray hair in a Tesla. Too funny :)

So it also sounds like not much burning rubber after all.

No need to worry. Roadster is perfectly capable of burning rubber only there is no need of doing it. It is more 'refined'. I guess when the driver will get hold of it, it will be much more controlabe vehicle than an ICE one. Much less danger of sudden traction loss in a corner.
 

vfx

Well-Known Member
Aug 18, 2006
14,790
48
CA CA
"I was somewhat surprised by the almost casual mention of a sport battery pack. Sounded almost like it was a given"

Not too surprising because Elon has been quoted more than once that he would like to see a sport-tuned Roadster.

If he has been "spending too much time with Tesla" then he surely is concocting his own lab experiments to get the toys he wants.

A special high performance Roadster will make for some good sidebar press in Auto magazines . They always like showing the special edition concept cars.
 

TEG

Teslafanatic
Moderator
Aug 20, 2006
22,074
9,429
At one of the events I ran into some folks ( :wink: ) who are trying to get Tesla to work on a quick charge system to install at racetracks.

I think Tesla is already spread too thin to be doing special projects like this, but maybe someday...
 
Tesla 0-60 Comparo

The 2007 Porsche 911 GT2 does 0-60 in 3.7 seconds. That's with first reving the engine up to 5000 rpm, waiting for the turbo to rev up, and then dropping the clutch, subjecting it to most of the 530 horsepower and 505 ft-lbs of torque (ouch!). Any idea what a clutch replacement costs on a 911 GT2? Base price on that car is $192,000. A clutch has to be $5000 easy, maybe $10,000.

Diarmuid made an interesting comment when I spoke to him. He said that some people have told him that Tesla could get away with charging even more for the Roadster, but they aren't really interested in doing so.

While I don't personally volunteer to pay extra, I tend to agree. It can't do everything the Porsce 911 GT2 can do, and doesn't have the quite same level of creature comforts, but you are geting a similar level of performance for about half the price. Throw in the fact that it is so unique, that you will save a bundle of cash on fuel, tuneups, and replacement clutches, and that it is green, while the Porsche is not so much. The fact that the first year of production is sold out also indicates that at least it is not overpriced. I think we have a winner!

Let's hope they can hit another home-run with the Whitestar.
 
The 2007 Porsche 911 GT2 does 0-60 in 3.7 seconds. That's with first reving the engine up to 5000 rpm, waiting for the turbo to rev up, and then dropping the clutch, subjecting it to most of the 530 horsepower and 505 ft-lbs of torque (ouch!). Any idea what a clutch replacement costs on a 911 GT2? Base price on that car is $192,000. A clutch has to be $5000 easy, maybe $10,000.

When I was doing the homework for my Esprit purchase, the one must-have mod that everybody pointed me toward was the torque chip. This would re-program the engine computer to produce more torque, particularly in 1st gear.

As I did more research, I found out the engine was programmed the way it was for a reason. It was designed to produce all the low-end torque that the clutch and transmission components could withstand! Later cars had upgraded powertrain parts, and the upgraded chip was meant for those cars. You could put the new chip in the older car and it would work. . . for a while.

The first Esprits in the 1970s came with a normally aspirated 4-cyl engine. Later they added a turbo, and then in 1997 they moved to the twin-turbo V8. But the transmission was the same! They had to program the engine to go easy on the transmission because it had never been designed to handle that much power.

I've heard a lot of horror stories about Esprits with mechanical problems. I think it's because a lot of people abuse the cars -- doing a lot of those hard launches, for example. Or chipping them and neglecting to upgrade the rest of the drivetrain. My Esprit hasn't been abused, and it's been rock-solid reliable (aside from the rat problem, which is now being fixed) for over two years. In fact, it's the only one of my three cars that doesn't drip some kind of fluid onto the floor.

Diarmuid made an interesting comment when I spoke to him. He said that some people have told him that Tesla could get away with charging even more for the Roadster, but they aren't really interested in doing so.

It would appear they aren't charging everything the market will bear. However. . . If you look at the Roadster as a "halo car" for their brand, they have to keep it from being too far out in fantasy land for most people to take seriously. They don't want to label Tesla cars as "those things nobody can afford".

For which I am thankful. I'm going out on a limb as it is. If it was any higher I would be waiting and hoping to maybe get a used one someday before I become too gray-haired.
 

vfx

Well-Known Member
Aug 18, 2006
14,790
48
CA CA
"Sold out"?

Since when is 600 cars sold out?

I thought I remember reading that the goal was 800 cars. Or even 1000 cars for a model year.

600 is great and it's been said that Tesla is (or at least was) on average selling a car every 2 days. Have they really called the 2007-2008 year sold out?

Is the person ordering car number 601 now officially ordering car one for the 2009 model year?
 

TEG

Teslafanatic
Moderator
Aug 20, 2006
22,074
9,429
I think the "goal" got adjusted a bit.

This press release says 650 (50+600) planned to be made in 2008...

----------------------------

This from the Tesla FAQ:

"Q: Is it still possible to purchase a 2008 model year Tesla Roadster?
A: At this point all 2008 Tesla Roadsters have already been spoken for. If you are interested in buying a car, we recommend you join our wait list . Wait list members will have the first opportunity to order any additional 2008 cars that may become available, and they will be first on the list when we start taking orders for 2009 model year cars."
 
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