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Max charging amp on 240v60a circuit without wall charger

Hello folks, I have a 240 volt 60 amp circuit going into my garage. Nema 14-50 plug (female). My question is, if I get a cord with a 14-50 male plug at one end, and a J1772 connector at the other end for the car, will my car charge at 48 amps (80% of my 60 amp circuit)? Or is the charging level set in some other way, requiring a $500+ purchase of a JuiceBox or HPWC or similar?

Right now I use the charging cable that came with the car and a Tesla Nema 14-50 adapter. It charges at 32 amps, and I am guessing the circuitry in the charging cable limits it to that?

Hoping it's just a matter of the right wire and connectors. Also, if that is indeed the case, anyone know where to get one? I only see J1772 to Nema 14-50 female plugs online. I need to plug into a female receptable, so I need a 14-50 male on one end of the cable.

Many thanks.
 
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I get a cord with a 14-50 male plug at one end, and a J1772 connector at the other end for the car, will my car charge at 48 amps (80% of my 60 amp circuit)?
Unfortunately, it doesn't work that way. You need to get a dedicated EVSE (Juicebox/HPWC). The car needs to 'communicate' to the EVSE for safety, and a piece of wire won't have that, so the car won't start charging.

Or is the charging level set in some other way, requiring a $500+ purchase of a JuiceBox or HPWC or similar?
Yes, you'll need to purchase Juicebox 48 Pro or Tesla Wall Connector.

If you're putting in a brand new 60A (48A continous) circuit in your garage, please consider installing a NEMA 14-60R (recepticle) instead of a 14-50R. The 14-60 outlet is rated for 60A (48A continous) and can be used with the Juicebox Pro 48 or Tesla Wall Connector to get the full 48A of current. You will just need to install a NEMA 14-60P (plug) on the EVSE. Alternatively, you can just hardwire the EVSE to your 60A circuit and forgo the receptacle altogether, but this will mean that you won't be able to unplug it and take it with you (if that matters to you). I doubt many people take their Juicebox/HWPC with them as they're large units with heavy cables.

Some options for the NEMA 14-60R (recepticle):
Leviton
Bryant
Hubbell
Eaton

Some options for the NEMA 14-60P (plug):
Leviton
Hubbell
Eaton

Lastly, you can install a 50A circuit with the NEMA 14-50R as you suggested. However, then you're limiting yourself to only 40A continous, so if I were putting a new circuit, I'd make it 60A to get the full current and to make the installation cost worth it.

Right now I use the charging cable that came with the car and a Tesla Nema 14-50 adapter. It charges at 32 amps, and I am guessing the circuitry in the charging cable limits it to that?
That's right. Even though you're using a 14-50 plug which should in theory give 40A continous, the Tesla EVSE that comes with the car is limited to 32A, so the plug is coded to pull no more than 32A.
 
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Hello folks, I have a 240 volt 60 amp circuit going into my garage. Nema 14-50 plug (female). My question is, if I get a cord with a 14-50 male plug at one end, and a J1772 connector at the other end for the car, will my car charge at 48 amps (80% of my 60 amp circuit)? Or is the charging level set in some other way, requiring a $500+ purchase of a JuiceBox or HPWC or similar?

Right now I use the charging cable that came with the car and a Tesla Nema 14-50 adapter. It charges at 32 amps, and I am guessing the circuitry in the charging cable limits it to that?

Hoping it's just a matter of the right wire and connectors. Also, if that is indeed the case, anyone know where to get one? I only see J1772 to Nema 14-50 female plugs online. I need to plug into a female receptable, so I need a 14-50 male on one end of the cable.

Many thanks.

The max charge rate is 32A when using the mobile connector that came with the car. If my understanding is correct, the most common way to utilize the full potential of a 60A circuit is by hard wiring the wall connector rather than using a receptacle. By going with the 14-50 receptacle, you are not going to be able to exceed 40A on any unit.
 
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MorrisonHiker

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You could also look for a Gen 1 Mobile connector from before December 2017 and use a 14-50 adapter to charge at 40A. Here's one for $150 on eBay but it looks like you'd have to add the 14-50 adapter for $45 more from Tesla (or less elsewhere). Sometimes they are up for sale on TMC as well.

Unless you can find a used one cheap, it's probably better to go with a wall connector or a corded mobile connector. The corded mobile connector would also do 40A via a 14-50 outlet but at $520, it would probably end up costing more than a gen 3 wall connector which is capable of charging at 48A.
 
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jcanoe

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Oct 2, 2020
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Maryland
Hello folks, I have a 240 volt 60 amp circuit going into my garage. Nema 14-50 plug (female). My question is, if I get a cord with a 14-50 male plug at one end, and a J1772 connector at the other end for the car, will my car charge at 48 amps (80% of my 60 amp circuit)? Or is the charging level set in some other way, requiring a $500+ purchase of a JuiceBox or HPWC or similar?

Right now I use the charging cable that came with the car and a Tesla Nema 14-50 adapter. It charges at 32 amps, and I am guessing the circuitry in the charging cable limits it to that?

Hoping it's just a matter of the right wire and connectors. Also, if that is indeed the case, anyone know where to get one? I only see J1772 to Nema 14-50 female plugs online. I need to plug into a female receptable, so I need a 14-50 male on one end of the cable.

Many thanks.
1) The 14-50R (receptacle) is rated for a maximum of 50A. There is a less common 14-60R (rated for a maximum of 60A.) To be code compliant your current circuit breaker should be changed to 50A or the receptacle should be changed to a 14-60R or else a hard-wired installation of the Tesla Wall Connector. (I have only read of one example of electric vehicle service equipment (EVSE) that is available with a 14-60 power plug; this means that almost all of the suppliers do not support use of a receptacle on a circuit greater than 50A.)

2) You can't just use an extension cord with a 14-50 or similar plug on one end and the J1772 connector at the other end. (There is quite a bit of electrical engineering that went into the design of the Level 1 and Level 2 EVSE to make it safe and simple to use.) You must use an approved EVSE when charging any EV or plug-in hybrid vehicle. The Tesla Mobile Connector and Tesla Wall Connector units are Tesla's EVSE. Non-Tesla EVSE are available from a number of suppliers including Juicebox (previously noted), ClipperCreek, Chargepoint, Grizzl-e and other brands. If you use a non-Tesla EVSE you will need to use the Tesla J1772 adapter that comes with the Tesla vehicle to charge.

3) The Tesla Mobile Connector is limited to a maximum of 32A. If you want to charge at up to 40A Tesla also sells a corded Mobile Connector with a fixed 14-50 plug that enables charging at up to 40A. If you need to charge at 48A (the maximum amperage when using Level 2 charging for the Model Y) then you would need to install the Tesla Wall Connector on a hard wired circuit. (A hard wired EVSE can be fully sealed for use in all weather conditions. Any time there is a power plug the connection cannot be fully sealed against water intrusion.)
 
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A reminder that the on-board charger is limited to 48 amps / 11.5 kW for long range (including performance), and 32 amps / 7 .7 kW for standard range.


The Gen 1 Wall Connector provides up to 80 amps, but no current 'on menu' model can utilize the full current. The ones that can were special ordered with twin on-board chargers, a configuration made obsolete by Superchargers.

Personally I have my home charging dialed back to 24 amps for efficiency. It has been more than sufficient. The only time I need faster charging is when on road trips.
 
Wow, thanks for all the great info! Kishkaru, really appreciate the links. What a difference in pricing between the different manufacturers!

Yes, I want to do 48amps (80% of my 60amp circuit) and yes, I was concerned about the Nema 14-50 connection. I will switch that out. And if I must get a wall connector because they "communicate" with the car's charging circuitry, I want to get a solution that will work with any electric vehicle in case I get a non-Tesla EV in the future. I know about Juicebox. What other options are there?

Really appreciate all the great info and the super quick responses. Thank you!
 

jcanoe

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Oct 2, 2020
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I would suggest installing the Tesla Wall Connector. Other options are going to be more expensive. If you ever need to charge a non-Tesla vehicle you can always have an electrician change out the Wall Connector or install a second charging circuit.

Another option would be to use a J1772 to Tesla charging adapter. This adapter enables non-Tesla vehicles to charge using a Tesla non-Supercharger charging cable.
 
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nwdiver

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Feb 17, 2013
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You could also look for a Gen 1 Mobile connector from before December 2017 and use a 14-50 adapter to charge at 40A. Here's one for $150 on eBay but it looks like you'd have to add the 14-50 adapter for $45 more from Tesla (or less elsewhere). Sometimes they are up for sale on TMC as well.

Unless you can find a used one cheap, it's probably better to go with a wall connector or a corded mobile connector. The corded mobile connector would also do 40A via a 14-50 outlet but at $520, it would probably end up costing more than a gen 3 wall connector which is capable of charging at 48A.

Those Gen 1 connectors kinda suck. I've killed 2 of them.
 

jcanoe

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Oct 2, 2020
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jcanos, thank you for the great info. I will look at the other options ...the Tesla charger is my last choice simply because it is Tesla specific (if I understand it correctly). I would prefer to be able to charge any brand electric vehicle, if possible.
My go to supplier of EVSE, other than the Tesla Wall Connector, would be ClipperCreek. ClipperCreek has been manufacturing EVSE, in the US, longer than just about any supplier. My only beef with all of the Tesla charging offerings is that the charging cable is only ~18 ft long when other manufacturers offer 24 ft or 25 ft long charging cords. An example of a ClipperCreek EVSE capable of charging at 48A is the HCS-60. This EVSE has a 25 ft charging cord, designed to be hard wired into a 60A circuit. 48A Level 2 EVSE HCS-60 Hardwired | ClipperCreek

The Lectron Tesla to J1772 adapter enables non-Tesla vehicles to charge using a Tesla charging station (non-Supercharger station only) at up to 250V and 40A. The price of the Lectron Tesla to J1772 adapter is very reasonable.
Lectron - Tesla to J1772 Adapter, Max 40A & 250V - For Tesla High Powered Connector, Destination Charger (White)
 
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nwdiver

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Feb 17, 2013
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My go to supplier of EVSE, other than the Tesla Wall Connector, would be ClipperCreek. ClipperCreek has been manufacturing EVSE, in the US, longer than just about any supplier. My only beef with all of the Tesla charging offerings is that the charging cable is only ~18 ft long when other manufacturers offer 24 ft or 25 ft long charging cords. An example of a ClipperCreek EVSE capable of charging at 48A is the HCS-60. This EVSE has a 25 ft charging cord, designed to be hard wired into a 60A circuit. 48A Level 2 EVSE HCS-60 Hardwired | ClipperCreek

The Lectron Tesla to J1772 adapter enables non-Tesla vehicles to charge using a Tesla charging station (non-Supercharger station only) at up to 250V and 40A. The price of the Lectron Tesla to J1772 adapter is very reasonable.
Lectron - Tesla to J1772 Adapter, Max 40A & 250V - For Tesla High Powered Connector, Destination Charger (White)

Yeah... Clipper Creek is a beast. They're a bit pricey but IMHO they're worth the extra expense. Simple and reliable.
 
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MorrisonHiker

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Those Gen 1 connectors kinda suck. I've killed 2 of them.
We still have 3 of them that work fine. We used 2 of them daily for a couple of years without any problems. Once we had wall connectors installed, we put them in the trunks. Now we only really use them occasionally when traveling and need to top off at our destination overnight.
 

nwdiver

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We still have 3 of them that work fine. We used 2 of them daily for a couple of years without any problems. Once we had wall connectors installed, we put them in the trunks. Now we only really use them occasionally when traveling and need to top off at our destination overnight.

What charge rate did you usually use? I barely used mine, they were mostly for road trips but I would charge at ~40A. After the second one failed I got the mobile connecter with a fixed 14-50 plug.
 

MorrisonHiker

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Mar 8, 2015
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What charge rate did you usually use? I barely used mine, they were mostly for road trips but I would charge at ~40A. After the second one failed I got the mobile connecter with a fixed 14-50 plug.
For the two years we used them at home, I believe one was at 40A and the other was probably 36A. When travelling, I used 40A with a 14-50 outlet at my dad's but was limited to 32A (6-50 adapter) at my brother's since I found out the hard way that his 6-50 outlet used fuses instead of circuit breakers. Admittedly, we've only used our gen 1 mobile connectors a few times over the past two years since removing them from daily usage. We actually took one trip where I forgot to pack the mobile connector in the car and there was no Supercharger nearby. Fortunately, I was able to use my J1772 adapter to top off the car enough to make it back to the Supercharger network.
 
jcanos, thank you for the great info. I will look at the other options ...the Tesla charger is my last choice simply because it is Tesla specific (if I understand it correctly). I would prefer to be able to charge any brand electric vehicle, if possible.
Whether you get a Tesla Wall Connector (48A) or any other 48A J1772 EVSE, it doesn't really matter.

If you get a J1772 EVSE, you can use the included J1772->Tesla adapter with the vehicle to charge any Tesla.
If you get a Tesla EVSE, you can use an aftermarket ($250-$350) Tesla->J1772 adapter to charge any other J1772 EV.

(If you get adapter, make sure it supports at least 48A continous. The common ones only go up to 40A or 32A continuous. 80A example. Another 80A example)

So you see, the most important part is that you pick one and stick with it forever. Installing one and switching to the other costs a lot of money (typically $600+ for a new EVSE and installation costs), so it makes gas savings a lot harder to break even. Just think about which type of EV you're more likely to charge on a daily basis, and pick the EVSE based on that. If money is no objection and you have panel capacity, I'd install 2x 60A circuits and install a Tesla EVSE and a J1772 EVSE to have both bases covered!
 
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jcanoe

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Oct 2, 2020
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EVSE do have a finite life. When installed outdoors the charging cable and the chassis are be exposed to the weather all of the time. The charging connector can wear out, pins can get damaged. There are many examples of Gen1 Tesla Mobile Connectors failing, probably some of the early Tesla High Power Wall Connector (HPWC) have failed too.

A well built EVSE should last well beyond the warranty period (3 years seems to be the industry standard) but somewhere between 5 years and 10 years is probably all you can expect for this equipment. When an EVSE fails it will rarely pay for it to be repaired (unless under warranty.) When it is time to replace the EVSE there will be a newer, smarter EVSE available. (If you purchase the Tesla Wall Connector and it later fails you may be able to install an identical replacement Wall Connector without requiring an electrician if you are capable of installing electrical equipment.)
 
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