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Mods or DIYs for more range?

1LE McQueen

Member
Mar 22, 2019
268
315
Arizona
Hey all, I've been pretty curious as to how (or if) it would be possible to get much more than the Tesla rated range out of your Model 3?

Are there any popular weight reduction DIYs?
Aftermarket tires?
Specific spoilers or bumpers?
Anything else that makes the car more efficient?

For the purpose of this thread, please omit driving habits. Although easy driving is probably the #1 way to get the most range, we all have a preference ;)

Thanks!
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Nov 28, 2018
10,278
11,619
Riverside Co. CA
I know you said "omit driving habits" but nothing will have much of an impact other than driving methods. Since miles will only actually roll off the battery meter 1:1 if one drives like the EPA tests (which is like 45 MPH or something), and driving speed is the number 1 thing that will impact range, there are no mods or anything that one can do that will let someone step on the go pedal faster without having a dramatic impact.

TL ; DR, you can get lower rolling resistant tires, or smaller tires, but unless you also perform "easy driving", nothing else will make much difference at all.
 

bmt00

Member
May 5, 2021
432
1,989
New Mexico
I know you said "omit driving habits" but nothing will have much of an impact other than driving methods. Since miles will only actually roll off the battery meter 1:1 if one drives like the EPA tests (which is like 45 MPH or something), and driving speed is the number 1 thing that will impact range, there are no mods or anything that one can do that will let someone step on the go pedal faster without having a dramatic impact.

TL ; DR, you can get lower rolling resistant tires, or smaller tires, but unless you also perform "easy driving", nothing else will make much difference at all.
Hey, visitor from Model S land here. I know there's a big difference between 19" and 21" wheels/tires, I presume due to the shorter sidewalls with higher rolling resistance. I would think the biggest non-driving thing you could do is get smaller wheels with larger and more compliant sidewalls.
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Nov 28, 2018
10,278
11,619
Riverside Co. CA
Hey, visitor from Model S land here. I know there's a big difference between 19" and 21" wheels/tires, I presume due to the shorter sidewalls with higher rolling resistance. I would think the biggest non-driving thing you could do is get smaller wheels with larger and more compliant sidewalls.

Depends on what tires the person purchasing the model 3 gets. One could possibly target lower rolling resistance tires than the OEM ones, but unless someone is buying the performance version, they can opt for the 18s which are pretty good to begin with. That still wont help anyone more than easing off the pedal, though.
 
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RayK

Active Member
Apr 5, 2016
2,129
2,099
San Jose, CA
How about this?

1625621215590.png


Solar cells mounted on the roof.
 

1LE McQueen

Member
Mar 22, 2019
268
315
Arizona
I know you said "omit driving habits" but nothing will have much of an impact other than driving methods. Since miles will only actually roll off the battery meter 1:1 if one drives like the EPA tests (which is like 45 MPH or something), and driving speed is the number 1 thing that will impact range, there are no mods or anything that one can do that will let someone step on the go pedal faster without having a dramatic impact.

TL ; DR, you can get lower rolling resistant tires, or smaller tires, but unless you also perform "easy driving", nothing else will make much difference at all.

I remember reading about an aero package that included a front splitter and rear lip that made the car a lot more aero efficient. On a long range M3, it was supposed to be close to 400 miles of range? It might've been unplugged perf. but not sure.
 
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Frank99

April 2018 Model 3 LR RWD, EAP, FSD
Apr 7, 2016
309
407
Arizona
Use the 18” wheels (+1-2% range) with the aero hubcaps (+0-4% range) and Michelin MXM4 tires (+0-10%) inflated to 45 psi.
Live someplace warm because below freezing temps have big impacts to range.
Turn off Summon and Sentry. Turn off remote access.
Leave the windows rolled up when you drive.
take out the spare tire. 😉
Put a magnet around the main power line to the motor (make sure it’s the positive lead) to align the electron flow and lessen resistive losses. 🙄

Other than that, we have to talk driving habits.
 

Frank99

April 2018 Model 3 LR RWD, EAP, FSD
Apr 7, 2016
309
407
Arizona
I remember reading about an aero package that included a front splitter and rear lip that made the car a lot more aero efficient. On a long range M3, it was supposed to be close to 400 miles of range? It might've been unplugged perf. but not sure.
Ok, there is a possibility there. I’m not sure which kit you’re referring to, but reducing airflow under the car has a chance to reduce drag. I’d have some pointed questions for the vendor to prove it however.
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Nov 28, 2018
10,278
11,619
Riverside Co. CA
I apologize in advance if I can't post external links, but this was what I read


From your link, this quote:

=================
Critics will be quick to note that aerodynamic improvements in the confines of a wind tunnel do not directly translate to improvements in the real world, for a number of reasons. That’s true, but before and after tests in a controlled environment are the best way to understand the improvements that come with a new product.
=================

The article states "43 miles of rated range at 70MPH (in a wind tunnel), for a "few thousand dollars". In the real world that probably translates to 20 ish miles of range, and then only if one was driving most of the battery out.

I realize its a thought experiment, somewhat, but a model 3 with "353 miles of rated range" will, on a daily basis have a realistic usable range of 90% to 20% or 30%, so 317 to 71, or 246 miles of "range" before you get into the fact that the miles dont roll off at 1:1.

Even if one added 30 miles "of range" through efficiencies like tires and such, it would change that 246 number to 268, for "a few thousand dollars".

Like I said, i understand it as a thought experiment, but in reality, the actual usable range wont change much.

EDIT: I will also say, that as a thought experiment its different than the normal "range" discussion here, which is why I did not move it into the master range thread.
 
Last edited:
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Frank99

April 2018 Model 3 LR RWD, EAP, FSD
Apr 7, 2016
309
407
Arizona
The article is also remarkably silent on WHICH Model 3 they saw these results on. For example, It’s unlikely that the rear spoiler will improve range on a standard LR AWD Model 3; perhaps it does on a P.
 

RayK

Active Member
Apr 5, 2016
2,129
2,099
San Jose, CA
I assume you're joking but that's probably 500W at the absolute most.
Yeah, it was a tongue-in-cheek suggestion. There's not much energy to be derived from roof mounted, flexible panels. At least nothing that will make a substantial improvement to the car's range. It might be enough energy to keep the climate control running when the car is parked so, what, maybe 5-10 miles during the day, assuming strong sunlight?
 
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AlanSubie4Life

Efficiency Obsessed Member
Oct 22, 2018
10,383
12,623
San Diego
Aftermarket tires?

Get the super slippery tires the Hyundai Ioniq used to use? Very poor stopping distance but maybe quite efficient. Might not be available in the load rating needed.

People tape the panel gaps I guess. Might be more effective than the aero kits? No idea.

You could rip out the interior but I don’t think it would help all that much, since weight is not all that important. It does matter of course for a hill, but you gain the energy back, and often on highway runs where range matters, there is not regen on downhill segments (just less power output, and progressively less the heavier your load), and in that scenario the weight really starts to not matter, since regen is what wastes the energy (you want to avoid regen!!!). In a scenario where there is a lot of regen, weight most definitely WOULD matter. But again, when range matters, there’s rarely any significant regen taking place.
 
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Candleflame

Active Member
Mar 9, 2015
3,144
1,465
QLD, Australia
Use the 18” wheels (+1-2% range) with the aero hubcaps (+0-4% range) and Michelin MXM4 tires (+0-10%) inflated to 45 psi.
Live someplace warm because below freezing temps have big impacts to range.
Turn off Summon and Sentry. Turn off remote access.
Leave the windows rolled up when you drive.
take out the spare tire. 😉
Put a magnet around the main power line to the motor (make sure it’s the positive lead) to align the electron flow and lessen resistive losses. 🙄

Other than that, we have to talk driving habits.

18" wheels with aeros is way more than just 5% more range.

The stealth performance compared to the performance gets like 10-20% more range.

If the OP wants more range the best thing is to add the aero kit and then lower the car as much as comfortable and mount the 18" tires with aeros and pump the tires up to 46 psi. I reckon all of this together will probably give 15-20% more range.
 

Candleflame

Active Member
Mar 9, 2015
3,144
1,465
QLD, Australia
Get the super slippery tires the Hyundai Ioniq used to use? Very poor stopping distance but maybe quite efficient. Might not be available in the load rating needed.

People tape the panel gaps I guess. Might be more effective than the aero kits? No idea.

You could rip out the interior but I don’t think it would help all that much, since weight is not all that important. It does matter of course for a hill, but you gain the energy back, and often on highway runs where range matters, there is not regen on downhill segments (just less power output, and progressively less the heavier your load), and in that scenario the weight really starts to not matter, since regen is what wastes the energy (you want to avoid regen!!!). In a scenario where there is a lot of regen, weight most definitely WOULD matter. But again, when range matters, there’s rarely any significant regen taking place.

what about the Michelin EV tires? Have those been tested in the USA already? Not available in europe yet it seems.
 

AlanSubie4Life

Efficiency Obsessed Member
Oct 22, 2018
10,383
12,623
San Diego
what about the Michelin EV tires? Have those been tested in the USA already? Not available in europe yet it seems.
I haven’t seen reviews yet but I guess maybe those will be more performance oriented? No idea. I still think the terrible tires the original Ioniq ran are probably better for efficiency (if you could get the right size, etc., which you presumably cannot).
 

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