Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

My all around charging kit.

Cildein

Member
Aug 17, 2021
11
6
Virginia
OK I just wanted to share since I have tested a few cords, adapters, and plugs out there. Granted at home if possible you will want to go with as much power as possible but this works too, especially when traveling.

The setup is this:
Tesla Mobile charger
Tesla 6-20 plug
6-20 extension cord (25ft for me) --> https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07TCNT8ZB/
5-15p 12AWG to 20am T-Blade adapter --> https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08PNNMNC4/
14-50p to 6-20r Adapter
14-30p to 6-20r Adapter

Now the why (always remember that you should set your amps to the national standard of 80% the plug rating.) The Tesla Mobile charger auto detects voltage and sets the amp level based on the plug adapter used. Therefore you can plug into household 5-15 and 5-20 plugs using the 6-20 plug with the 5-15 adapter (linked above), and just adjust the amps (12amps for normal household plug 5-15) in your car based on which plug you are using. Next you can also use the 6-20 with 240v plugs like the 14-50 and 14-30 (obviously the 6-20 too) and no amp adjustments would be needed. The real bonus is that the extension cord is about the same as a 5-15 or 5-20 but MUCH smaller and lighter than a 14-50 or 14-30 yet can be used for both 120v and 240v.

So at max you going to get 16amp X 240v = 3840watts which is close to about 10MPH for my Model X. Which over night would recover and then some from whatever vacation spot we are visiting. If you don't want to worry about changing the amps (or tripping a breaker) you could get the 6-15 but that will lower your max charge rate to 2880watts.

For those in a rental property it is a lot less of a hassle to convert a 5-15 to a 6-15 or a 5-20 to a 6-20 (search the forums for input and ask an electrician)

With the right adapters I got this all to fit in the Tesla mobile charger bag, thus not taking up more room!

Thoughts?
 

Ostrichsak

Active Member
Sep 6, 2018
3,645
4,212
Colorado, USA
OK I just wanted to share since I have tested a few cords, adapters, and plugs out there. Granted at home if possible you will want to go with as much power as possible but this works too, especially when traveling.

The setup is this:
Tesla Mobile charger
Tesla 6-20 plug
6-20 extension cord (25ft for me) --> Amazon.com: NEMA 6-20 Plug to 6-20 Connector Extension Power Cord - 25FT, 20A/250V, 12/3 SJT, T Blade - Black : Tools & Home Improvement
5-15p 12AWG to 20am T-Blade adapter --> https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08PNNMNC4/
14-50p to 6-20r Adapter
14-30p to 6-20r Adapter

Now the why (always remember that you should set your amps to the national standard of 80% the plug rating.) The Tesla Mobile charger auto detects voltage and sets the amp level based on the plug adapter used. Therefore you can plug into household 5-15 and 5-20 plugs using the 6-20 plug with the 5-15 adapter (linked above), and just adjust the amps (12amps for normal household plug 5-15) in your car based on which plug you are using. Next you can also use the 6-20 with 240v plugs like the 14-50 and 14-30 (obviously the 6-20 too) and no amp adjustments would be needed. The real bonus is that the extension cord is about the same as a 5-15 or 5-20 but MUCH smaller and lighter than a 14-50 or 14-30 yet can be used for both 120v and 240v.

So at max you going to get 16amp X 240v = 3840watts which is close to about 10MPH for my Model X. Which over night would recover and then some from whatever vacation spot we are visiting. If you don't want to worry about changing the amps (or tripping a breaker) you could get the 6-15 but that will lower your max charge rate to 2880watts.

For those in a rental property it is a lot less of a hassle to convert a 5-15 to a 6-15 or a 5-20 to a 6-20 (search the forums for input and ask an electrician)

With the right adapters I got this all to fit in the Tesla mobile charger bag, thus not taking up more room!

Thoughts?
There was a master thread of sorts somewhere with pretty much exactly what you've listed here (in spec anyway) along with a lot of other useful adapters and details. I'd seek that out for anyone that is interested. This is quite helpful but if you're going down this path you likely will want a whole host of adapters just in case. My kit has probably two dozen different types of adapters, give or take. Definitely overkill though especially these days now that Superchargers are much more prevalent and ever-increasing in numbers.
 
  • Like
Reactions: E-curb

Watts_Up

Active Member
Mar 4, 2019
3,716
2,698
In a galaxy far, far away
My kit has probably two dozen different types of adapters, give or take. Definitely overkill though especially these days now that Superchargers are much more prevalent and ever-increasing in numbers.
Having different type of adaptaters can be helpful when you stay in area far away of any plublic chargers,
like when staying in a cabin or a campground in the mountains.

Otherwise you have to limit your remote trip, away from the last public plug, to about half your car range.
In some cases you can expect getting some range back from using the generative brake on the way back, but still often not sufficient.

Using portable solar panels can be also an option for getting your car charged enough
when coming back from your trekking or hiking, or when boondocking in a remote area.
 
Last edited:

Cildein

Member
Aug 17, 2021
11
6
Virginia
There was a master thread of sorts somewhere with pretty much exactly what you've listed here (in spec anyway) along with a lot of other useful adapters and details. I'd seek that out for anyone that is interested. This is quite helpful but if you're going down this path you likely will want a whole host of adapters just in case. My kit has probably two dozen different types of adapters, give or take. Definitely overkill though especially these days now that Superchargers are much more prevalent and ever-increasing in numbers.
Yeah the point of this was to keep it simple and flexible at your non home destination. Technically this covers 5 plugs types with only one extension cord and covers high and low voltage. All while fitting in the tesla charging bag. Not a small task.
 

George I

Member
Oct 24, 2017
55
45
Toronto
When I bought my Tesla in the spring of 2016 and, over the next year and a half, I bought a whole bunch of adapters. Chademo (necessary in the Maritimes in 2018 or sooner), 14-30, 10-30, TT-30 (nonTesla), 240v extension cord (24a with adapter to convert 14-50 and TT30 to 14-30), and the 14-50 that came with the car. I have used my 5-15 as much as all the others combined. Adapters were useful then but not so much now with so many more charging options around both superchargers and others. If you travel off the beaten path then the need increases eg. eastern New Brunswick, much of Nova Scotia, PEI. northeastern Ont., Manitoba north of the trans-Canada.

If I were starting over in 2021 I would first ask myself how much am I going off the beaten path? If yes I would get Chademo, Tesla extension cord
NEW! Tesla Extension Cord – EVSE Adapters or similar. I would tailor the rest on what I planned to do. If I was to be at RV parks then 14-50 and TT-30, if staying at friends then 14-30 or 10-30 is more likely to be useful, if campground in Ont. then TT-30, if traveling in the US 5-20 as I understand that they are quite common outdoor plugs there, if at a marina or yacht club then L5-30, if at a friend who is a welder then 6-50, if souther US then maybe 6-15 or 6-20 to use air conditioner plugs.

Overview of North American plugs: cosmacelf.net/Home%20Made%20Adapters.pdf

I keep hoping that Quick220 will make their product compatible with GFI circuits and not require opposite phases for their unit. I realize it would be more expensive/complicated but either 240v 12a or 120v 24a output would suit our Teslas just fine. This would become my second most useful plug after 5-15 and tied with Chademo and J1772.
 

dduffey

Member
Aug 26, 2015
372
300
Austin, TX
Great thinking. I've bought a lot of unused adapters for our Teslas and most unused (we are 100% EV). We have yet to buy an extension cord but this looks like a winner.
 

Stavinski

Member
Jan 31, 2021
125
144
USA
Having different type of adaptaters can be helpful when you stay in area far away of any plublic chargers,
like when staying in a cabin or a campground in the mountains.

Otherwise you have to limit your remote trip, away from the last public plug, to about half your car range.
In some cases you can expect getting some range back from using the generative brake on the way back, but still often not sufficient.

Using portable solar panels can be also an option for getting your car charged enough
when coming back from your trekking or hiking, or when boondocking in a remote area.
I’d like to see a picture of your portable solar panels that can charge your Tesla at all, let alone “enough”. You must have the tow package…
 
  • Like
Reactions: Rocky_H

Cildein

Member
Aug 17, 2021
11
6
Virginia
When I bought my Tesla in the spring of 2016 and, over the next year and a half, I bought a whole bunch of adapters. Chademo (necessary in the Maritimes in 2018 or sooner), 14-30, 10-30, TT-30 (nonTesla), 240v extension cord (24a with adapter to convert 14-50 and TT30 to 14-30), and the 14-50 that came with the car. I have used my 5-15 as much as all the others combined. Adapters were useful then but not so much now with so many more charging options around both superchargers and others. If you travel off the beaten path then the need increases eg. eastern New Brunswick, much of Nova Scotia, PEI. northeastern Ont., Manitoba north of the trans-Canada.

If I were starting over in 2021 I would first ask myself how much am I going off the beaten path? If yes I would get Chademo, Tesla extension cord
NEW! Tesla Extension Cord – EVSE Adapters or similar. I would tailor the rest on what I planned to do. If I was to be at RV parks then 14-50 and TT-30, if staying at friends then 14-30 or 10-30 is more likely to be useful, if campground in Ont. then TT-30, if traveling in the US 5-20 as I understand that they are quite common outdoor plugs there, if at a marina or yacht club then L5-30, if at a friend who is a welder then 6-50, if souther US then maybe 6-15 or 6-20 to use air conditioner plugs.

Overview of North American plugs: cosmacelf.net/Home%20Made%20Adapters.pdf

I keep hoping that Quick220 will make their product compatible with GFI circuits and not require opposite phases for their unit. I realize it would be more expensive/complicated but either 240v 12a or 120v 24a output would suit our Teslas just fine. This would become my second most useful plug after 5-15 and tied with Chademo and J1772.
I found this item which is a lot cheaper than the quick 220 but suffers from the same GFI circuit issue: Parkworld 885545 Combiner, RV Splitter V Adapter Cord 5-15P & TT-30P male to 14-50R female - - Amazon.com
You can get an adapter for a TT=30 to 5-15: https://www.amazon.com/Conntek-1410...d=1630110622&sprefix=TT-30+to+,aps,161&sr=8-4
Works fine when no GFI.
 

George I

Member
Oct 24, 2017
55
45
Toronto
I have a male TT-30 to female 14-30 adapter then I plug in my mobile connector with its 14-30 on the end. The current is automatically set to 24a and everyone is happpy with initial votage of 120 instead of 240v.
 
  • Love
  • Like
Reactions: Rocky_H and dduffey

wws

Active Member
Aug 11, 2014
1,049
1,169
Northern California
I found this item which is a lot cheaper than the quick 220 but suffers from the same GFI circuit issue: Parkworld 885545 Combiner, RV Splitter V Adapter Cord 5-15P & TT-30P male to 14-50R female - - Amazon.com

Those are dangerous compared with a Quick 220. The Quick 220 has built in relays for safety - which explains the extra cost.

Besides - that adapter will provide the same power for EV charging (12 amps x 240 volts) as simply using a TT-30 UMC adapter will (24 amps x 120 volts) plugged into just the TT-30. It has a little more value for an RV where the RV may need both 120V and 240V.


I started off doing much the same as you - basing a kit around a homemade "20 amp" extension cord and various adapters. But eventually moved to a "30 amp" kit because charging speed. It is based largely around off the shelf TT-30 extension cord and adapters on both ends that are commonly and inexpensively available in the RV community. A few homemade adapters too.

If Tesla were to ask me which one additional UMC adapter they should offer, my answer would unhesitatingly be TT-30. Distantly followed by 6-30 - because I have one in my garage. One of my homemade "adapters" is a 6-30P to TT-30R. It has to reach around a couple of cars so it is actually about 50 feet long. I then use it with the evseadapters TT-30 UMC adapter.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Rocky_H

LoudMusic

Member
Jul 21, 2020
627
701
Arkansas
It very much depends on each individual's usage of their vehicle, but I've found that the included NEMA 5-15 and Superchargers has been great.

I also have a NEMA 14-50 and outlet at the house, but 15A would also have been fine for the small amount of driving we do when we're home. 50A is just a fun convenience. In fact, we go several days without even bothering to plug in because we know whenever we do plug in the car will be at 90%+ before morning.

I also have an L5-30P (twist lock 120v30a) that I use at marinas. But again, it's just convenience. I could just as well charge from 15A circuits on the pedestals for the amount of driving we do.

In reality, the Supercharging network is amazingly robust and well positioned at this point. There's some inconvenience in charging up before you head out into wilderness or whatever, but a 200 mile round trip back to a Supercharger is nearly 100% covered in the US. And being from Arkansas, I am SUPER jealous of your Virginia coverage. In addition to all the Superchargers, there is a huge amount of Tesla destination chargers and J1772 chargers throughout your state, at great places like bed and breakfasts, wineries, breweries, markets, restaurants, and just random people who like EVs and want to support the migration.

It's good you have the equipment to give you peace of mind, but I suspect you won't use it as much as you think you will. I've literally only ever used my NEMA 14-50 at home, but assumed I'd be using it at campgrounds like every month. It just hasn't been necessary.
 

Attachments

  • 100milerange.PNG
    100milerange.PNG
    1.6 MB · Views: 24
  • Informative
Reactions: WarEagleGo

DblOSmith

Member
Jun 29, 2021
95
52
Missouri
It very much depends on each individual's usage of their vehicle, but I've found that the included NEMA 5-15 and Superchargers has been great.

I also have a NEMA 14-50 and outlet at the house, but 15A would also have been fine for the small amount of driving we do when we're home. 50A is just a fun convenience. In fact, we go several days without even bothering to plug in because we know whenever we do plug in the car will be at 90%+ before morning.

I also have an L5-30P (twist lock 120v30a) that I use at marinas. But again, it's just convenience. I could just as well charge from 15A circuits on the pedestals for the amount of driving we do.

In reality, the Supercharging network is amazingly robust and well positioned at this point. There's some inconvenience in charging up before you head out into wilderness or whatever, but a 200 mile round trip back to a Supercharger is nearly 100% covered in the US. And being from Arkansas, I am SUPER jealous of your Virginia coverage. In addition to all the Superchargers, there is a huge amount of Tesla destination chargers and J1772 chargers throughout your state, at great places like bed and breakfasts, wineries, breweries, markets, restaurants, and just random people who like EVs and want to support the migration.

It's good you have the equipment to give you peace of mind, but I suspect you won't use it as much as you think you will. I've literally only ever used my NEMA 14-50 at home, but assumed I'd be using it at campgrounds like every month. It just hasn't been necessary.
That gap NW of Memphis kills me. I don't know why there isn't a supercharger in Branson yet.... or Hardy, Arkansas or wherever.
 

LoudMusic

Member
Jul 21, 2020
627
701
Arkansas
That gap NW of Memphis kills me. I don't know why there isn't a supercharger in Branson yet.... or Hardy, Arkansas or wherever.

There are plans for one in Blythville. Seems to me Jonesboro would be good too.

Arkansas is ... not good for EVs. Or any sort of change for that matter.
 

Cildein

Member
Aug 17, 2021
11
6
Virginia
Those are dangerous compared with a Quick 220. The Quick 220 has built in relays for safety - which explains the extra cost.

Besides - that adapter will provide the same power for EV charging (12 amps x 240 volts) as simply using a TT-30 UMC adapter will (24 amps x 120 volts) plugged into just the TT-30. It has a little more value for an RV where the RV may need both 120V and 240V.



I started off doing much the same as you - basing a kit around a homemade "20 amp" extension cord and various adapters. But eventually moved to a "30 amp" kit because charging speed. It is based largely around off the shelf TT-30 extension cord and adapters on both ends that are commonly and inexpensively available in the RV community. A few homemade adapters too.

If Tesla were to ask me which one additional UMC adapter they should offer, my answer would unhesitatingly be TT-30. Distantly followed by 6-30 - because I have one in my garage. One of my homemade "adapters" is a 6-30P to TT-30R. It has to reach around a couple of cars so it is actually about 50 feet long. I then use it with the evseadapters TT-30 UMC adapter.
The overall point of that adapter with two 5-15 is that it is more likely when staying away you can find two plugs at the site.
 

Cildein

Member
Aug 17, 2021
11
6
Virginia
I don't know about the rest of you but one of the main points for me having an EV is that I can charge while sleeping and it is ready the next day. When I travel to a location not my home I would much rather wake up and immediately be on my way then to have to use up time (especially vacation time) to head out to a supercharger.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DblOSmith

LoudMusic

Member
Jul 21, 2020
627
701
Arkansas
I don't know about the rest of you but one of the main points for me having an EV is that I can charge while sleeping and it is ready the next day. When I travel to a location not my home I would much rather wake up and immediately be on my way then to have to use up time (especially vacation time) to head out to a supercharger.

Yeah for sure, me too. I try to stay at places that have EV charging.


Many hotels these days do. Either Tesla Destination (wall charger) or J1772. It's definitely a perk and I've stayed at several places because of their EV charging that I would not have stayed at otherwise. I've also plugged into 15A outlets at some places where I could find one in the parking garage.

This is my map of charging locations. Red are Superchargers, orange are Tesla Destination, yellow are J1772, and grays are various wall outlets.
 

Attachments

  • tessychargy.PNG
    tessychargy.PNG
    516.2 KB · Views: 18
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: dduffey

DblOSmith

Member
Jun 29, 2021
95
52
Missouri
Yeah for sure, me too. I try to stay at places that have EV charging.


Many hotels these days do. Either Tesla Destination (wall charger) or J1772. It's definitely a perk and I've stayed at several places because of their EV charging that I would not have stayed at otherwise. I've also plugged into 15A outlets at some places where I could find one in the parking garage.

This is my map of charging locations. Red are Superchargers, orange are Tesla Destination, yellow are J1772, and grays are various wall outlets.
How did you make that map? Are those all the sites you've visited?
 

LoudMusic

Member
Jul 21, 2020
627
701
Arkansas
How did you make that map? Are those all the sites you've visited?

Yes, these are specifically places I've plugged in my Tesla. It's a Google Map.


If you have a Google account that link should take you to the correct place. It's called "Google My Maps", and you can make custom maps. The tool is somewhat limited but gets the job done. The image I posted previously is a screen grab of one of my maps, and it's entirely manually created by dropping pins on the map. There are more fancy ways of accomplishing it with a spreadsheet and references in the map interface to information on the spreadsheet, but I'm not that cool ;)
 

DblOSmith

Member
Jun 29, 2021
95
52
Missouri
Yes, these are specifically places I've plugged in my Tesla. It's a Google Map.


If you have a Google account that link should take you to the correct place. It's called "Google My Maps", and you can make custom maps. The tool is somewhat limited but gets the job done. The image I posted previously is a screen grab of one of my maps, and it's entirely manually created by dropping pins on the map. There are more fancy ways of accomplishing it with a spreadsheet and references in the map interface to information on the spreadsheet, but I'm not that cool ;)
aah, I thought it was maybe all places you've checked-in with on Plugshare or something that auto-propagated. Ain't nobody got time fo' dat. :) Thanks, though.
 

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top