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My first Model 3 tire rotation experience at 28,000 Miles

Nghia_3M

Member
Nov 17, 2020
14
2
San Jose CA
You might want to consider having the alignment toe checked if the insides of your tires are worn. Any cupping? The model 3 toes in, normally, but the alignment from the factory has been known to be off. I rotated my tires in the Fall, 7500 miles, found the worn insides, had it checked, way out of spec. Replaced the set.

As far as the pucks are concerned, not all of them are metal. Some are regular rubber hockey pucks repurposed. I drilled ¾” holes, glued in some ¾” PEX, I had leftover. Wrapped hockey tape around the PEX to get the right friction fit, so the pucks hang tight. Now, if I have to take it in to a shop, I just stick the pucks in, and don’t worry about whether the shop has any.
I never knew there were so many tire terms out there. I had to google all of them cause I have very little experience with cars. I did not find any "cupping" on my front tires.
You might want to consider having the alignment toe checked if the insides of your tires are worn. Any cupping? The model 3 toes in, normally, but the alignment from the factory has been known to be off. I rotated my tires in the Fall, 7500 miles, found the worn insides, had it checked, way out of spec. Replaced the set.

As far as the pucks are concerned, not all of them are metal. Some are regular rubber hockey pucks repurposed. I drilled ¾” holes, glued in some ¾” PEX, I had leftover. Wrapped hockey tape around the PEX to get the right friction fit, so the pucks hang tight. Now, if I have to take it in to a shop, I just stick the pucks in, and don’t worry about whether the shop has any.
I never knew there were so many tire terms out there. I had to google all of them cause I have very little experience with cars. I did not find any "cupping" on my front tires. I am bit confused.... If the model 3 normally toes in, shouldn't the outer tread be worn? Some of the other people also reported the inner tread being worn too... So I am wondering if my car is actually "toe out" too much. Once I bring it into a shop (haven't found one yet), I can follow up with better info...
 

Nghia_3M

Member
Nov 17, 2020
14
2
San Jose CA
I never knew there were so many tire terms out there. I had to google all of them cause I have very little experience with cars. I did not find any "cupping" on my front tires. I am bit confused.... If the model 3 normally toes in, shouldn't the outer tread be worn? Some of the other people also reported the inner tread being worn too... So I am wondering if my car is actually "toe out" too much. Once I bring it into a shop (haven't found one yet), I can follow up with better info..
 

KenC

Active Member
Sep 4, 2018
3,559
3,231
Maine
The Tech that came out to upgrade my Vision Computer (the new Chip), said it would cost about $80 for a tire rotation. After spending the money and effort, it may have been better to let the tech do it. But then I wouldn't find out about the premature wear unless the tech pointed it out. Sometimes it's good to do it yourself so you learn about your car. If it truly was $40, that's a deal considering all the equipment needed.
Most definitely. That's why I like to rotate my tires. You get to visually inspect your tires, up close, also you get to look at your brake pads and rotors, and all the brake lines. And you can look at the suspension, shocks, and the under trays to see if there's anything leaking, ripping or dirt collecting or mice droppings. It's good practice if you ever need to swap out a tire, that is if you carry a spare. And, you can tighten the rear ground strap if your car is whining like it has for some of us.
 

KenC

Active Member
Sep 4, 2018
3,559
3,231
Maine
I never knew there were so many tire terms out there. I had to google all of them cause I have very little experience with cars. I did not find any "cupping" on my front tires.

I never knew there were so many tire terms out there. I had to google all of them cause I have very little experience with cars. I did not find any "cupping" on my front tires. I am bit confused.... If the model 3 normally toes in, shouldn't the outer tread be worn? Some of the other people also reported the inner tread being worn too... So I am wondering if my car is actually "toe out" too much. Once I bring it into a shop (haven't found one yet), I can follow up with better info...
The tires "toe" in, AND, are cambered. The combination means that if the toe isn't correct, you can see abnormal wear on the inner tread blocks. When it's bad, you get a cupping effect that you can feel when you run your hand over the inner tread block. The front of each block will wear more than the backs, creating ridges, aka cupping. You should be able to hear cupping as well.

Sure, your tires can be out of spec, toeing IN or OUT too much. They both can lead to abnormal wear on the inner tread blocks. That's because of the camber.

Many tires shops offer free alignment check. Of course, they have an incentive to find the alignment out of spec, even if a tiny bit. Where I live $100 is pretty normal for a 4-wheel alignment. On a Tesla alignment is super easy since they can only adjust toe. Takes no time at all. My local shop had never aligned a "3" before, so I had to explain everything to them, and they wanted me to drive it up on their Hunter Roadforce alignment jig, and center the steering wheel, when the tires were free floating. Then I helped the tech enter the "3"s alignment specs into the computer, and watched as the tech removed the under trays and adjusted the toe. It gave me a chance to take pics of the motors, and look at the suspension bits to make sure everything looked good. It's worth doing just to learn more about your car, and it never hurts to be friendly to the tire shop guys, so when you change to Winter tires or new tires, or fix a flat, you know who can help you. And, of course, they'll remember the guy with the Tesla.

In San Jose, every tire shop should know Teslas, unlike here in Maine, where they still are fairly rare.
 

Nghia_3M

Member
Nov 17, 2020
14
2
San Jose CA
The tires "toe" in, AND, are cambered. The combination means that if the toe isn't correct, you can see abnormal wear on the inner tread blocks. When it's bad, you get a cupping effect that you can feel when you run your hand over the inner tread block. The front of each block will wear more than the backs, creating ridges, aka cupping. You should be able to hear cupping as well.

Sure, your tires can be out of spec, toeing IN or OUT too much. They both can lead to abnormal wear on the inner tread blocks. That's because of the camber.

Many tires shops offer free alignment check. Of course, they have an incentive to find the alignment out of spec, even if a tiny bit. Where I live $100 is pretty normal for a 4-wheel alignment. On a Tesla alignment is super easy since they can only adjust toe. Takes no time at all. My local shop had never aligned a "3" before, so I had to explain everything to them, and they wanted me to drive it up on their Hunter Roadforce alignment jig, and center the steering wheel, when the tires were free floating. Then I helped the tech enter the "3"s alignment specs into the computer, and watched as the tech removed the under trays and adjusted the toe. It gave me a chance to take pics of the motors, and look at the suspension bits to make sure everything looked good. It's worth doing just to learn more about your car, and it never hurts to be friendly to the tire shop guys, so when you change to Winter tires or new tires, or fix a flat, you know who can help you. And, of course, they'll remember the guy with the Tesla.

In San Jose, every tire shop should know Teslas, unlike here in Maine, where they still are fairly rare.
Wow. Thanks for all the expertise. I actually understood all of that!
 

KenC

Active Member
Sep 4, 2018
3,559
3,231
Maine
Wow. Thanks for all the expertise. I actually understood all of that!
The funny thing is, when I owned an ICE, my weekly habit was always to check pressures and look at the tires for uneven wear, while filling the tank with gas. So, my tires got checked weekly. I'm sure it was the same with most people.

With the Tesla, I no longer stop for gas, so I no longer check my tires weekly. I'd stick my hand in the wheel well, and run my hand over the inner tread blocks to check for feathering. Actually wherever I wrote cupping in earlier posts, I actually meant feathering! ;) So, I would have caught my abnormal wear almost immediately with my old ICE. With the Tesla, I caught it too late, and had to buy all new tires, or at least 2 fronts.
 

PDB2655

Supporting Member
Sep 30, 2020
53
24
Stuart,Fl
Just had my tires rotated at 7000 miles my Tesla rep came to me Tesla charge me 35.00 don't need to buy all those stinking tools which I have. I got my Model 3 so I do not have work on them I just call the service tech make my appointment and zip its done, I will always get my tires rotated at 7000 miles after all these the most expensive cost we have on this car.
 

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