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New Driver - Student Driver

First thing I'm thinking is that learning with a regenerative braking car could be tricky, not to say dangerous. If that's the only way your kid learns how to drive, how will they react when they rent a car and forget to hit the break and rear end someone? In 20 years, it might be a different story, and one pedal driving might be the norm for all new cars, but we're far from it.

It's always better to learn the hard way, and then go to the easier way. I'll always be grateful that I learned how to drive with manual cars and drove manual for the first 10 years I had a car, even though I appreciate the ease of the Tesla driving.
 
My son became a teenage driver before the Tesla days, but if it were today, there is no way I would let him drive it. Too concerned about inexperienced parking, driving, and maybe even testing the power of the car with friends. I gave my son an OLD car with high crash ratings. It was also cheaper on the insurance and I felt better about the safety.
 
First thing I'm thinking is that learning with a regenerative braking car could be tricky, not to say dangerous. If that's the only way your kid learns how to drive, how will they react when they rent a car and forget to hit the break and rear end someone? In 20 years, it might be a different story, and one pedal driving might be the norm for all new cars, but we're far from it.

It's always better to learn the hard way, and then go to the easier way. I'll always be grateful that I learned how to drive with manual cars and drove manual for the first 10 years I had a car, even though I appreciate the ease of the Tesla driving.
Thank you for the response. The c300 is also quirky with stop and go and the break hold.

This is the challenge. A third car is out of the question. I do not like driving the c300. I think he will get more practice with me..than with mom.

the more I type on this subject..this is definitely a first world problem...
 
My son became a teenage driver before the Tesla days, but if it were today, there is no way I would let him drive it. Too concerned about inexperienced parking, driving, and maybe even testing the power of the car with friends. I gave my son an OLD car with high crash ratings. It was also cheaper on the insurance and I felt better about the safety.
Keep in mind..he is not getting a car. I have no intentions of him driving with friends for at least 3 years from now..at 18th. Until then..just want him to learn...
 
First thing I'm thinking is that learning with a regenerative braking car could be tricky, not to say dangerous. If that's the only way your kid learns how to drive, how will they react when they rent a car and forget to hit the break and rear end someone? In 20 years, it might be a different story, and one pedal driving might be the norm for all new cars, but we're far from it.

It's always better to learn the hard way, and then go to the easier way. I'll always be grateful that I learned how to drive with manual cars and drove manual for the first 10 years I had a car, even though I appreciate the ease of the Tesla driving.
I agree!
 
I needed a car about the time my kids entered that phase. I bought a Corolla with a manual and they all learned how to drive it. Many years later, I found out that several of their friends also learned how to drive a manual with that car.
Today, I'd probably go with a used Prius. It'd teach some EV economy skills and let's face, there is no drag racing in a Prius.

I would hesitate greatly on teaching them on a Tesla. However, setting it up for chill, max speed, and creep modes would likely work, if you don't tell them they can change it. They'll figure that part out soon enough. Once they get used to it, switch cars so they learn the differences.
We spent a LOT of time, getting on the highway, driving down a few miles, off the highway to a round-about, back on the highway. Over and over again. Lots of good skills. Plus I tried to create distractions (after a few weeks) so they got used to processing and staying safe. For example, QUICK!!! TAKE THIS EXIT as we sped by. Teach them to ALWAYS stay in control as the driver. You can always go to the next exit.

Slow speed control is critical. Get a few soccer cones and an empty parking lot and have them approach and park in tighter and tighter spaces.
One critical piece that isn't usually taught is the tires and the role they play, Some good YT videos on that and have them explain what the tire ratings mean.

Being in New Hampshire, I also took them on a snow day and had them learn to control skids and spins in the snow. In Tampa, hydroplaning will need to be taught. They need to learn to feel it about to happen and how to react to it. Not sure how you teach them that feel.

My thoughts were to teach them what can go wrong and how to react to it. For example, turning off an automatic and feeling the lack of power steering and power brakes. Not sure how to do that in a Tesla. However, my daughter was driving an 7 y.o. ICE on the highway when the engine suddenly stopped. She reacted perfectly and said the training really helped as it lost the power, she remember how to compensate. She was able to put it in neutral and coast to the emergency lane and stop safely.
 
Thank you for the response. The c300 is also quirky with stop and go and the break hold.

This is the challenge. A third car is out of the question. I do not like driving the c300. I think he will get more practice with me..than with mom.

the more I type on this subject..this is definitely a first world problem...

You should be able to turn off the brake hold. And disable auto stop start.
 
Keep in mind..he is not getting a car. I have no intentions of him driving with friends for at least 3 years from now..at 18th. Until then..just want him to learn...
yes, I understand. Just telling you what I did with our son. I'm wondering how you are going to monitor how he does not have friends in the car when you are not around. Kids will be kids.
 
One thing to remember is that younger brains are more elastic brains, actually far less likely to make one-pedal mistakes than us old folks. Imagine you trying to pick up one of your teenager's video games, and think about how harder it is for you to learn that game than your teenager, even when he/she first pulls it out of the box.

I think that a teenager learning to drive on a Tesla is fine, with the gentle reminder that other cars roll forward and don't brake for you.
 
  • Disagree
Reactions: FlyF4
Our 16-yr old daughter recently got her license and drives the Model Y frequently. She originally learned on a Subaru Forester while also taking a Driver Ed course using mostly 4-dr gas sedans. She's had no problems switching between gas and electric and while I originally had some hesitation with her driving the Y, she's become a confident driver and the superior Tesla navigation screen has helped her in reading maps and anticipating in advance which lanes to move to so as to avoid last second lane changes which helps her become a safer driver as well.
 
The reality of things is that most of the cars your student driver may end up driving for the next decade or so (and maybe longer) will probably still be ICE (unless you are specifically planning to give them the Tesla). This would include whatever car they end up with, any acquaintances cars, rentals, etc.

I think that it would be better to learn with a ICE. The transition to Tesla would be the same transition we've all gone through. I would imagine an ICE would feel pretty loose and quirky to handle if all one has ever driven is an EV.

That said I don't think this is nearly as big of a deal as learning manual vs automatic for example.
 

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