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Samsung sells Fuel Cell division...

Discussion in 'Energy, Environment, and Policy' started by malcolm, Apr 27, 2016.

  1. malcolm

    malcolm Active Member

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    ...to the wonderfully named Kolon Industries.

    Samsung plan to invest in EV batteries and related parts over the next five years.

    Source: Samsung to drop fuel cell business
     
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  2. glhs272

    glhs272 Unnamed plug faced villian

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    Good move on Samsung's part.
     
  3. TheTalkingMule

    TheTalkingMule Active Member

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    I still think we're just around the corner from having way more electricity than we know what to do with. In that scenario is it not more logical to couple some advanced yet simple form of fuel cell into personal transportation? Why charge a huge battery pack when you could be constantly charging a small pack with a small fuel cell?

    I know Elon hates fuel cells, but if total efficiency becomes less of a priority isn't much lower weight with much higher potential power density the logical solution? Not to mention the ease of fueling once some type of solid zero-pressure storage option becomes feasible for hydrogen.
     
  4. glhs272

    glhs272 Unnamed plug faced villian

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    Fuel cells may still find their niche such as stationary storage. If it doesn't need billions of dollars in infrastructure, like a hydrogen powered vehicle would need, then hydrogen fuel cells may be well suited for that application. Splitting water via electrolysis, storing the hydrogen, then "burning" the hydrogen in a fuel cell to create electricity again seems like a good idea for applications where the power would be wasted anyway. The best scenario I see would be large wind farms. I don't see a practical application for household usage. So in the end fuel cells will remain a niche industry and I still think Samsung is right to remain focused on batteries. That's where all the money will be going in the coming decades.
     

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