TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker or making a Paypal contribution here: paypal.me/SupportTMC

Tire noise amplified by aluminum chassis?

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by ToddRLockwood, Jul 25, 2013.

  1. ToddRLockwood

    ToddRLockwood Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    1,263
    Location:
    Burlington, Vermont
    Don't get me wrong, I love my Model S, but something I've been curious about even before I received my car... is the sound of the tires actually made worse by the aluminum chassis? I first noticed this while watching many of the first-drive videos. There is a particular acoustic note heard inside the car when it goes down the road. While the Model S is very quiet overall, the car seems to have a different ambient sound than a steel chassis sedan (minus any engine noise, of course). I wonder if the aluminum chassis has anything to do with this, and could Tesla potentially take further steps to deaden it. I'm a former audio engineer, so I tend to be hyper-aware of these things.
     
  2. mknox

    mknox Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2012
    Messages:
    8,570
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    I do an awful lot of freeway driving at constant speed, usually with Cruise on. My Model S is definitely no quieter than my previous Cadillac CTS was in those conditions. Sometimes I think it may even be a bit louder, and I attribute it all to tire noise. There is very little wind noise (in either car) and the Caddy's engine was indiscernible unless I put my foot into it. Whether this has anything to do with aluminum vs. steel I couldn't say.
     
  3. ToddRLockwood

    ToddRLockwood Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    1,263
    Location:
    Burlington, Vermont
    No question that tires are where the noise starts, but how that noise gets transmitted through the suspension and frame is another story. Sound is easily transmitted when there's a physical connection—in this case: tire to wheel to suspension to frame. The aluminum frame, with its low density, would be less likely to attenuate noise and vibration than would steel. To a degree, the battery pack may help add some density. Another factor is the acoustic resonance of the interior. Every space has a particular resonance, and if the frequency of the tire noise happens to coincide with the interior resonance, the noise will be amplified.
     
  4. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2012
    Messages:
    12,766
    Location:
    Texas
    Also the road surface has a great deal to do with it. Certain tires with certain road surfaces can be really bad.
     
  5. ToddRLockwood

    ToddRLockwood Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    1,263
    Location:
    Burlington, Vermont
    I imagine the weight of the car and the relatively high tire pressures contribute as well. Perhaps this will lead to tire manufacturers developing quieter tread designs.
     
  6. mnx

    mnx 2013 P85

    Joined:
    May 6, 2009
    Messages:
    2,281
    Location:
    Ancaster, Canada
    Silent 21 tires
     

Share This Page