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2-year ownership experience with a now 5-year-old 2016 Tesla Model S 75D

SilverGS

Active Member
Nov 3, 2016
1,636
947
Ontario
2-year ownership experience with a now 5-year-old 2016 Tesla Model S 75D

Background/context


I bought my 2016 Tesla Model S 75D at the end of June 2019. It had just been returned by the previous owner to the local Tesla Service Center in Oakville, Ontario, Canada at the end of a 3-year lease. The car had 26.8k km/16.75k miles and was in almost new condition cosmetically. It had a couple of light scratches on the paint, but the interior was flawless.

I had driven a 2016 Model S75D shortly after they came out in 2016 and I was smitten after the 10 min test drive. I knew I would be replacing my GS400 eventually to get one. This is coming from a die-hard ICE car owner that is a hard core enthusiast. I am not some greenie that is trying to save the planet. It just felt so much better than my Lexus and my view did not change in the least bit 3 years later when I was finally able to get a used one in 2019. It felt better in virtually every single aspect (performance, throttle responsiveness, 1 pedal driving (regen brakes), etc.

At the time I bought it, Tesla was providing a full 4-year/80k km/50k miles bumper-to-bumper warranty starting the day you bought it, so basically the car is under warranty till June 2023/106.8k km/66.75k miles (note this warranty was not in addition to the original warranty which was a year left when I bought it – not including the battery and drive units which have a longer warranty – 8 years/160k km/100k miles). Tesla Canada have since dropped that perk and now only offer a 1 year/20k km/12.5k miles warranty on top of any existing original warranty. I’ll be the first to admit that one of the main factors in my decision to purchase the car was the 4-year additional warranty.

Warranty claims

I have had 3 warranty claims in the 2 years and 39.7k km/24.8k miles I’ve driven it so far (current mileage is now – 66.5k km/41.6k miles).
  1. Sep 30, 2019 – (35.8k km/22.4k miles) - Front left and right Adaptive Air spring modules replaced. These were replaced to get rid of a very faint click/rattle sound coming from the front of the car. I am a tad OCD about cars and doubt that a lot of folks would have noticed the sound.
  2. June 3, 2021 – (64.8k km/40.55k miles) – Rear passenger side door handle replaced. It didn’t actually stop working, but again was making a faint strange sound while retracting. I had a Tesla “ranger” (mobile technician) come to my house and replace it.
  3. June 3, 2021 – (64.8k km/40.55k miles) – Glove box broke and would not close properly. I had a Tesla “ranger” (mobile technician) come to my house and replace it, the same time as the door handle above.


Overall Reliability

So all in all, the car has been very reliable. The quality of the fit and finish on my specific car was excellent to begin with, no rattles, loose trim or other interior problems when I bought it. The quality of the leather (leather was discontinued in 2018) is clearly not as good as other luxury cars, however it doesn’t bother me in the slightest as I am more about how a car drives (instantaneous throttle responsiveness (as in you think and the car immediately reacts), buttery smooth power delivery, steering sharpness, handling for a big sedan, etc).



OTA

Over-the-Air updates (OTA) – I only noted the important updates/upgrades below (there have been 26 software updates to the car in the 2 years I’ve had the car. The Software OS went from 2019.20.4.2 to 2020.48.37.2).
  1. Sketchpad, Media volume and owner’s manual improvements
  2. Key fob security update
  3. Improvements to Auto Pilot and Maps.
  4. Spotify app added
  5. Scheduled departure added to schedule for home charging. This simply means that setup a schedule when you leave home and the car will be charged and warmed up (or cooled down) to coincide with your departure from home
  6. Automatic navigation – the car will automatically setup the navigation to your work address on weekdays when you leave around the time of your scheduled departure (noted in point above).
  7. Automatic wiper improvements – now uses one of the autopilot cameras to detect water drops on the windshield and adjusts the speed of the wipers according to your driving speed/and or intensity of rain/snow falling.
  8. Added a whole bunch of new voice commands and now reads out SMS
  9. Improved BT support
  10. Added nearby charging stations sorted by max charging power to the map
  11. Added number of available charging stations at superchargers in your vicinity. So if a charging station as 16 chargers and 10 are busy charging other Tesla’s you would see 6 as being available at that location.
  12. Added notifications that show up on your phone if any of the doors/windows was left open/not closed completely.
  13. Driving visualization improvements in the instrument cluster


Uncorking Procedure

One major software upgrade done to my car was the “uncorking” procedure when I had the car for less than a year (April 2020). This was basically a software unlock that increased the horsepower/torque by over 20%. That increased the horsepower to 476 Hp and dropped the 0-60 time from 5.2 seconds to 4.1 seconds. This was done for free by Tesla as soon as I found out that my car was upgradable. A mobile tech came to my house and connected his laptop to my car via the OBD2 port and an hour later, my car basically felt like a brand new completely different car. Not all 75D’s were upgradeable. I got lucky that mine already had the necessary hardware (some high power fuse).



Maintenance and other expenses
  1. April 2020 – Clean and lube brakes $150 CAD – this is a required annual maintenance item as the physical brakes don’t see much use (motor regen slows the car down 90% of the time) and especially in winter climates such as mine where salt and mud is dumped on the roads in the winter, it’s advisable to get the brakes cleaned as their life span gets reduced from all the muck that doesn’t always come off due to very little brake use. You can change a setting to reduce the regen, however once you are used to 1 pedal driving, having less regen kills some of the fun of the driving, so I always leave it at full regen.
  2. April 2021 – Clean and lube brakes - $150 CAD
  3. April 2021 – Cabin air filter replacement
  4. Total cost for electricity for driving 39.7k km/24.8k miles has been approximately $800 CAD
  5. I have deliberately not included the cost of a spare set of rims/tires for the winter as that has nothing to do with a Tesla specifically. Rough cost was $1500 CAD.


Summary

Pros

  • Tesla’s mastery of the EV drivetrain does need any more praise from me. Whenever I drive the car, I have this huge grin on my face and I don’t even have to be accelerating hard or anything like that – its just the amazingly smooth power delivery right-now-forward-motion (no fuel mixture to burn, no gears to change etc)
  • The Tesla supercharger network of course
  • The spaciousness of the hatchback Model S is just mind boggling. With the second row seats folded down, I can easily fit a twin sized mattress in the back (6.5 feet long by 35 inches wide space between the wheel wells)
  • Very low cost for maintenance and use (cheap electricity). I can’t help comparing it the cost of premium fuel for the GS400 that was easily $400/month vs $400/year now with the S
  • Excellent driving position (very comfortable/firm seats with excellent lumbar support)
  • Overall very good visibility with big windows other than the rear window (which is not such a big deal once you’ve had the car for a week or two)

Cons
  • Quality of fit and finish - any “review” of a Tesla is not complete without mentioning something about the quality of fit and finish as that seems to get a lot of folks emotions and feelings all over the place – my car has no loose trim or misalignment of any panels or uneven gaps except for some minor unevenness in the chrome trim around 2 of the doors.
  • Range - I wouldn’t necessarily classify this as a con, but it also gets a lot of folks up in arms – if I drive at a reasonable speed – 75 mph – I lose about 20% of the stated range as Tesla states their EPA at a steady 55 to 60 mph which understandably upsets a lot of people. It doesn’t bother me one bit as I know exactly how much range I will actually get and in the 2 years I’ve had it, I have never ever run out electrons nor has it ever caused me any inconvenience as my car is usually charged to 80% every day and range is a total non-issue as far as I am concerned. I get about 400 km (250 miles) on a full charge and I can hit that mileage without any issues if I drive at 110 kph (just under 70 mph)


Closing remarks

In short, if I could go back in time and buy the car all over again, I would do so without any hesitation whatsoever. The car is simply a blast to drive and costs almost zero $ to run – it’s such a no brainer to own one assuming you want and it makes financial sense to you. I paid about 50% off the MSRP for my used S which is about the average in depreciation for most “luxury” cars.

Recent pics

newwheels11a-jpg.651161


newwheels21a-jpg.651158



newwheels22a_e00e2950535a62fa28eb2ace5aeae1a98dc3b01d_10a108963d487f863c0ba50fdbc960c96279120e.jpg


newwheels19a_a7c0a237f1c741c5188fa5ca4f915c5d411e7271_661dda4f785206121ce9505ef1fdccd5ff570063.jpg


newwheels10a_7caa4613e40b96756861007e298629626fc94960_7a8c56e9e28f7d6372439301853b6358a3723b48.jpg
 

SilverGS

Active Member
Nov 3, 2016
1,636
947
Ontario
Are those Model X 20's? That wheel/tire setup looks great
Yes they are! Thanks!

I bought these used and got them re-finished - powder coated gloss gunmetal.

Specs of tires and wheels
  • Model X 20 inch wheels
  • Bolt pattern: 5x120
  • Center Bore: 64.1mm
  • Front wheels: 20 x 9.0 +35 mm offset.
  • Rear wheels: 20 x 9.5 +35mm offset.

Tires - Falken Azenis FK510
  • Front: 255/35/20
  • Rear: 285/30/20

Quick thoughts -
  • There's no rubbing at all - I keep the car in the "Low" suspension setting
  • I feel the car "looks' higher simply because the wheel/tire combo now comes out to the outer edge of the fenders and the gap between the top of the tire and the fender is more noticeable compared to the OEM 19's that was inset and was not that noticeable.
  • I don't plan on lowering the car using the popular Blox lowering links simply because that means I would need to remove the links come winter or if the car has to go in for warranty work. The car is still under warranty. Not worth the trouble in my opinion.
  • There is a tad more noise with these tires - I think it's simply because they are brand new and that will get less after a bit of use
  • I haven't noticed any degradation in range - haven't driven it enough yet.
 

David29

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Aug 1, 2015
2,257
1,909
DEDHAM, MA
2-year ownership experience with a now 5-year-old 2016 Tesla Model S 75D

Background/context


I bought my 2016 Tesla Model S 75D at the end of June 2019. It had just been returned by the previous owner to the local Tesla Service Center in Oakville, Ontario, Canada at the end of a 3-year lease. The car had 26.8k km/16.75k miles and was in almost new condition cosmetically. It had a couple of light scratches on the paint, but the interior was flawless.

I had driven a 2016 Model S75D shortly after they came out in 2016 and I was smitten after the 10 min test drive. I knew I would be replacing my GS400 eventually to get one. This is coming from a die-hard ICE car owner that is a hard core enthusiast. I am not some greenie that is trying to save the planet. It just felt so much better than my Lexus and my view did not change in the least bit 3 years later when I was finally able to get a used one in 2019. It felt better in virtually every single aspect (performance, throttle responsiveness, 1 pedal driving (regen brakes), etc.

At the time I bought it, Tesla was providing a full 4-year/80k km/50k miles bumper-to-bumper warranty starting the day you bought it, so basically the car is under warranty till June 2023/106.8k km/66.75k miles (note this warranty was not in addition to the original warranty which was a year left when I bought it – not including the battery and drive units which have a longer warranty – 8 years/160k km/100k miles). Tesla Canada have since dropped that perk and now only offer a 1 year/20k km/12.5k miles warranty on top of any existing original warranty. I’ll be the first to admit that one of the main factors in my decision to purchase the car was the 4-year additional warranty.

Warranty claims

I have had 3 warranty claims in the 2 years and 39.7k km/24.8k miles I’ve driven it so far (current mileage is now – 66.5k km/41.6k miles).
  1. Sep 30, 2019 – (35.8k km/22.4k miles) - Front left and right Adaptive Air spring modules replaced. These were replaced to get rid of a very faint click/rattle sound coming from the front of the car. I am a tad OCD about cars and doubt that a lot of folks would have noticed the sound.
  2. June 3, 2021 – (64.8k km/40.55k miles) – Rear passenger side door handle replaced. It didn’t actually stop working, but again was making a faint strange sound while retracting. I had a Tesla “ranger” (mobile technician) come to my house and replace it.
  3. June 3, 2021 – (64.8k km/40.55k miles) – Glove box broke and would not close properly. I had a Tesla “ranger” (mobile technician) come to my house and replace it, the same time as the door handle above.


Overall Reliability

So all in all, the car has been very reliable. The quality of the fit and finish on my specific car was excellent to begin with, no rattles, loose trim or other interior problems when I bought it. The quality of the leather (leather was discontinued in 2018) is clearly not as good as other luxury cars, however it doesn’t bother me in the slightest as I am more about how a car drives (instantaneous throttle responsiveness (as in you think and the car immediately reacts), buttery smooth power delivery, steering sharpness, handling for a big sedan, etc).



OTA

Over-the-Air updates (OTA) – I only noted the important updates/upgrades below (there have been 26 software updates to the car in the 2 years I’ve had the car. The Software OS went from 2019.20.4.2 to 2020.48.37.2).
  1. Sketchpad, Media volume and owner’s manual improvements
  2. Key fob security update
  3. Improvements to Auto Pilot and Maps.
  4. Spotify app added
  5. Scheduled departure added to schedule for home charging. This simply means that setup a schedule when you leave home and the car will be charged and warmed up (or cooled down) to coincide with your departure from home
  6. Automatic navigation – the car will automatically setup the navigation to your work address on weekdays when you leave around the time of your scheduled departure (noted in point above).
  7. Automatic wiper improvements – now uses one of the autopilot cameras to detect water drops on the windshield and adjusts the speed of the wipers according to your driving speed/and or intensity of rain/snow falling.
  8. Added a whole bunch of new voice commands and now reads out SMS
  9. Improved BT support
  10. Added nearby charging stations sorted by max charging power to the map
  11. Added number of available charging stations at superchargers in your vicinity. So if a charging station as 16 chargers and 10 are busy charging other Tesla’s you would see 6 as being available at that location.
  12. Added notifications that show up on your phone if any of the doors/windows was left open/not closed completely.
  13. Driving visualization improvements in the instrument cluster


Uncorking Procedure

One major software upgrade done to my car was the “uncorking” procedure when I had the car for less than a year (April 2020). This was basically a software unlock that increased the horsepower/torque by over 20%. That increased the horsepower to 476 Hp and dropped the 0-60 time from 5.2 seconds to 4.1 seconds. This was done for free by Tesla as soon as I found out that my car was upgradable. A mobile tech came to my house and connected his laptop to my car via the OBD2 port and an hour later, my car basically felt like a brand new completely different car. Not all 75D’s were upgradeable. I got lucky that mine already had the necessary hardware (some high power fuse).



Maintenance and other expenses
  1. April 2020 – Clean and lube brakes $150 CAD – this is a required annual maintenance item as the physical brakes don’t see much use (motor regen slows the car down 90% of the time) and especially in winter climates such as mine where salt and mud is dumped on the roads in the winter, it’s advisable to get the brakes cleaned as their life span gets reduced from all the muck that doesn’t always come off due to very little brake use. You can change a setting to reduce the regen, however once you are used to 1 pedal driving, having less regen kills some of the fun of the driving, so I always leave it at full regen.
  2. April 2021 – Clean and lube brakes - $150 CAD
  3. April 2021 – Cabin air filter replacement
  4. Total cost for electricity for driving 39.7k km/24.8k miles has been approximately $800 CAD
  5. I have deliberately not included the cost of a spare set of rims/tires for the winter as that has nothing to do with a Tesla specifically. Rough cost was $1500 CAD.


Summary

Pros

  • Tesla’s mastery of the EV drivetrain does need any more praise from me. Whenever I drive the car, I have this huge grin on my face and I don’t even have to be accelerating hard or anything like that – its just the amazingly smooth power delivery right-now-forward-motion (no fuel mixture to burn, no gears to change etc)
  • The Tesla supercharger network of course
  • The spaciousness of the hatchback Model S is just mind boggling. With the second row seats folded down, I can easily fit a twin sized mattress in the back (6.5 feet long by 35 inches wide space between the wheel wells)
  • Very low cost for maintenance and use (cheap electricity). I can’t help comparing it the cost of premium fuel for the GS400 that was easily $400/month vs $400/year now with the S
  • Excellent driving position (very comfortable/firm seats with excellent lumbar support)
  • Overall very good visibility with big windows other than the rear window (which is not such a big deal once you’ve had the car for a week or two)

Cons
  • Quality of fit and finish - any “review” of a Tesla is not complete without mentioning something about the quality of fit and finish as that seems to get a lot of folks emotions and feelings all over the place – my car has no loose trim or misalignment of any panels or uneven gaps except for some minor unevenness in the chrome trim around 2 of the doors.
  • Range - I wouldn’t necessarily classify this as a con, but it also gets a lot of folks up in arms – if I drive at a reasonable speed – 75 mph – I lose about 20% of the stated range as Tesla states their EPA at a steady 55 to 60 mph which understandably upsets a lot of people. It doesn’t bother me one bit as I know exactly how much range I will actually get and in the 2 years I’ve had it, I have never ever run out electrons nor has it ever caused me any inconvenience as my car is usually charged to 80% every day and range is a total non-issue as far as I am concerned. I get about 400 km (250 miles) on a full charge and I can hit that mileage without any issues if I drive at 110 kph (just under 70 mph)


Closing remarks

In short, if I could go back in time and buy the car all over again, I would do so without any hesitation whatsoever. The car is simply a blast to drive and costs almost zero $ to run – it’s such a no brainer to own one assuming you want and it makes financial sense to you. I paid about 50% off the MSRP for my used S which is about the average in depreciation for most “luxury” cars.

Recent pics

newwheels11a-jpg.651161


newwheels21a-jpg.651158



newwheels22a_e00e2950535a62fa28eb2ace5aeae1a98dc3b01d_10a108963d487f863c0ba50fdbc960c96279120e.jpg


newwheels19a_a7c0a237f1c741c5188fa5ca4f915c5d411e7271_661dda4f785206121ce9505ef1fdccd5ff570063.jpg


newwheels10a_7caa4613e40b96756861007e298629626fc94960_7a8c56e9e28f7d6372439301853b6358a3723b48.jpg
I love the silver and envy you for having it! I do love my classic multi-coat red, but the silver had been my first choice. Sad that it is now gone. Tesla's limited choice of paint colors is unfortunate, especially at the price of a Model S....
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ormond

SilverGS

Active Member
Nov 3, 2016
1,636
947
Ontario
I love the silver and envy you for having it! I do love my classic multi-coat red, but the silver had been my first choice. Sad that it is now gone. Tesla's limited choice of paint colors is unfortunate, especially at the price of a Model S....
Thanks. Interestingly - because I bought it used, I had to settle on a color I didn't really want lol. My previous car was silver and I wanted the color you have - MCR, but none came up for sale when I needed a car, so got the silver one. The other side of the river is always greener lol

Yes, Tesla is lacking in a bunch of areas (color choices being one), but they still make the best EV in town right now.....
 
  • Like
Reactions: David29

FlatSix911

Porsche 918 Hybrid
Jun 15, 2015
6,875
6,491
Silicon Valley
2-year ownership experience with a now 5-year-old 2016 Tesla Model S 75D

Background/context


I bought my 2016 Tesla Model S 75D at the end of June 2019. It had just been returned by the previous owner to the local Tesla Service Center in Oakville, Ontario, Canada at the end of a 3-year lease. The car had 26.8k km/16.75k miles and was in almost new condition cosmetically. It had a couple of light scratches on the paint, but the interior was flawless.

I had driven a 2016 Model S75D shortly after they came out in 2016 and I was smitten after the 10 min test drive. I knew I would be replacing my GS400 eventually to get one. This is coming from a die-hard ICE car owner that is a hard core enthusiast. I am not some greenie that is trying to save the planet. It just felt so much better than my Lexus and my view did not change in the least bit 3 years later when I was finally able to get a used one in 2019. It felt better in virtually every single aspect (performance, throttle responsiveness, 1 pedal driving (regen brakes), etc.

At the time I bought it, Tesla was providing a full 4-year/80k km/50k miles bumper-to-bumper warranty starting the day you bought it, so basically the car is under warranty till June 2023/106.8k km/66.75k miles (note this warranty was not in addition to the original warranty which was a year left when I bought it – not including the battery and drive units which have a longer warranty – 8 years/160k km/100k miles). Tesla Canada have since dropped that perk and now only offer a 1 year/20k km/12.5k miles warranty on top of any existing original warranty. I’ll be the first to admit that one of the main factors in my decision to purchase the car was the 4-year additional warranty.

Warranty claims

I have had 3 warranty claims in the 2 years and 39.7k km/24.8k miles I’ve driven it so far (current mileage is now – 66.5k km/41.6k miles).
  1. Sep 30, 2019 – (35.8k km/22.4k miles) - Front left and right Adaptive Air spring modules replaced. These were replaced to get rid of a very faint click/rattle sound coming from the front of the car. I am a tad OCD about cars and doubt that a lot of folks would have noticed the sound.
  2. June 3, 2021 – (64.8k km/40.55k miles) – Rear passenger side door handle replaced. It didn’t actually stop working, but again was making a faint strange sound while retracting. I had a Tesla “ranger” (mobile technician) come to my house and replace it.
  3. June 3, 2021 – (64.8k km/40.55k miles) – Glove box broke and would not close properly. I had a Tesla “ranger” (mobile technician) come to my house and replace it, the same time as the door handle above.


Overall Reliability

So all in all, the car has been very reliable. The quality of the fit and finish on my specific car was excellent to begin with, no rattles, loose trim or other interior problems when I bought it. The quality of the leather (leather was discontinued in 2018) is clearly not as good as other luxury cars, however it doesn’t bother me in the slightest as I am more about how a car drives (instantaneous throttle responsiveness (as in you think and the car immediately reacts), buttery smooth power delivery, steering sharpness, handling for a big sedan, etc).



OTA

Over-the-Air updates (OTA) – I only noted the important updates/upgrades below (there have been 26 software updates to the car in the 2 years I’ve had the car. The Software OS went from 2019.20.4.2 to 2020.48.37.2).
  1. Sketchpad, Media volume and owner’s manual improvements
  2. Key fob security update
  3. Improvements to Auto Pilot and Maps.
  4. Spotify app added
  5. Scheduled departure added to schedule for home charging. This simply means that setup a schedule when you leave home and the car will be charged and warmed up (or cooled down) to coincide with your departure from home
  6. Automatic navigation – the car will automatically setup the navigation to your work address on weekdays when you leave around the time of your scheduled departure (noted in point above).
  7. Automatic wiper improvements – now uses one of the autopilot cameras to detect water drops on the windshield and adjusts the speed of the wipers according to your driving speed/and or intensity of rain/snow falling.
  8. Added a whole bunch of new voice commands and now reads out SMS
  9. Improved BT support
  10. Added nearby charging stations sorted by max charging power to the map
  11. Added number of available charging stations at superchargers in your vicinity. So if a charging station as 16 chargers and 10 are busy charging other Tesla’s you would see 6 as being available at that location.
  12. Added notifications that show up on your phone if any of the doors/windows was left open/not closed completely.
  13. Driving visualization improvements in the instrument cluster


Uncorking Procedure

One major software upgrade done to my car was the “uncorking” procedure when I had the car for less than a year (April 2020). This was basically a software unlock that increased the horsepower/torque by over 20%. That increased the horsepower to 476 Hp and dropped the 0-60 time from 5.2 seconds to 4.1 seconds. This was done for free by Tesla as soon as I found out that my car was upgradable. A mobile tech came to my house and connected his laptop to my car via the OBD2 port and an hour later, my car basically felt like a brand new completely different car. Not all 75D’s were upgradeable. I got lucky that mine already had the necessary hardware (some high power fuse).



Maintenance and other expenses
  1. April 2020 – Clean and lube brakes $150 CAD – this is a required annual maintenance item as the physical brakes don’t see much use (motor regen slows the car down 90% of the time) and especially in winter climates such as mine where salt and mud is dumped on the roads in the winter, it’s advisable to get the brakes cleaned as their life span gets reduced from all the muck that doesn’t always come off due to very little brake use. You can change a setting to reduce the regen, however once you are used to 1 pedal driving, having less regen kills some of the fun of the driving, so I always leave it at full regen.
  2. April 2021 – Clean and lube brakes - $150 CAD
  3. April 2021 – Cabin air filter replacement
  4. Total cost for electricity for driving 39.7k km/24.8k miles has been approximately $800 CAD
  5. I have deliberately not included the cost of a spare set of rims/tires for the winter as that has nothing to do with a Tesla specifically. Rough cost was $1500 CAD.


Summary

Pros

  • Tesla’s mastery of the EV drivetrain does need any more praise from me. Whenever I drive the car, I have this huge grin on my face and I don’t even have to be accelerating hard or anything like that – its just the amazingly smooth power delivery right-now-forward-motion (no fuel mixture to burn, no gears to change etc)
  • The Tesla supercharger network of course
  • The spaciousness of the hatchback Model S is just mind boggling. With the second row seats folded down, I can easily fit a twin sized mattress in the back (6.5 feet long by 35 inches wide space between the wheel wells)
  • Very low cost for maintenance and use (cheap electricity). I can’t help comparing it the cost of premium fuel for the GS400 that was easily $400/month vs $400/year now with the S
  • Excellent driving position (very comfortable/firm seats with excellent lumbar support)
  • Overall very good visibility with big windows other than the rear window (which is not such a big deal once you’ve had the car for a week or two)

Cons
  • Quality of fit and finish - any “review” of a Tesla is not complete without mentioning something about the quality of fit and finish as that seems to get a lot of folks emotions and feelings all over the place – my car has no loose trim or misalignment of any panels or uneven gaps except for some minor unevenness in the chrome trim around 2 of the doors.
  • Range - I wouldn’t necessarily classify this as a con, but it also gets a lot of folks up in arms – if I drive at a reasonable speed – 75 mph – I lose about 20% of the stated range as Tesla states their EPA at a steady 55 to 60 mph which understandably upsets a lot of people. It doesn’t bother me one bit as I know exactly how much range I will actually get and in the 2 years I’ve had it, I have never ever run out electrons nor has it ever caused me any inconvenience as my car is usually charged to 80% every day and range is a total non-issue as far as I am concerned. I get about 400 km (250 miles) on a full charge and I can hit that mileage without any issues if I drive at 110 kph (just under 70 mph)


Closing remarks

In short, if I could go back in time and buy the car all over again, I would do so without any hesitation whatsoever. The car is simply a blast to drive and costs almost zero $ to run – it’s such a no brainer to own one assuming you want and it makes financial sense to you. I paid about 50% off the MSRP for my used S which is about the average in depreciation for most “luxury” cars.

Recent pics

newwheels11a-jpg.651161


newwheels21a-jpg.651158



newwheels22a_e00e2950535a62fa28eb2ace5aeae1a98dc3b01d_10a108963d487f863c0ba50fdbc960c96279120e.jpg


newwheels19a_a7c0a237f1c741c5188fa5ca4f915c5d411e7271_661dda4f785206121ce9505ef1fdccd5ff570063.jpg


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Nice write-up... thanks for sharing.
 

TSLA3

Member
Apr 2, 2016
5
4
Phoenix
2-year ownership experience with a now 5-year-old 2016 Tesla Model S 75D

Background/context


I bought my 2016 Tesla Model S 75D at the end of June 2019. It had just been returned by the previous owner to the local Tesla Service Center in Oakville, Ontario, Canada at the end of a 3-year lease. The car had 26.8k km/16.75k miles and was in almost new condition cosmetically. It had a couple of light scratches on the paint, but the interior was flawless.

I had driven a 2016 Model S75D shortly after they came out in 2016 and I was smitten after the 10 min test drive. I knew I would be replacing my GS400 eventually to get one. This is coming from a die-hard ICE car owner that is a hard core enthusiast. I am not some greenie that is trying to save the planet. It just felt so much better than my Lexus and my view did not change in the least bit 3 years later when I was finally able to get a used one in 2019. It felt better in virtually every single aspect (performance, throttle responsiveness, 1 pedal driving (regen brakes), etc.

At the time I bought it, Tesla was providing a full 4-year/80k km/50k miles bumper-to-bumper warranty starting the day you bought it, so basically the car is under warranty till June 2023/106.8k km/66.75k miles (note this warranty was not in addition to the original warranty which was a year left when I bought it – not including the battery and drive units which have a longer warranty – 8 years/160k km/100k miles). Tesla Canada have since dropped that perk and now only offer a 1 year/20k km/12.5k miles warranty on top of any existing original warranty. I’ll be the first to admit that one of the main factors in my decision to purchase the car was the 4-year additional warranty.

Warranty claims

I have had 3 warranty claims in the 2 years and 39.7k km/24.8k miles I’ve driven it so far (current mileage is now – 66.5k km/41.6k miles).
  1. Sep 30, 2019 – (35.8k km/22.4k miles) - Front left and right Adaptive Air spring modules replaced. These were replaced to get rid of a very faint click/rattle sound coming from the front of the car. I am a tad OCD about cars and doubt that a lot of folks would have noticed the sound.
  2. June 3, 2021 – (64.8k km/40.55k miles) – Rear passenger side door handle replaced. It didn’t actually stop working, but again was making a faint strange sound while retracting. I had a Tesla “ranger” (mobile technician) come to my house and replace it.
  3. June 3, 2021 – (64.8k km/40.55k miles) – Glove box broke and would not close properly. I had a Tesla “ranger” (mobile technician) come to my house and replace it, the same time as the door handle above.


Overall Reliability

So all in all, the car has been very reliable. The quality of the fit and finish on my specific car was excellent to begin with, no rattles, loose trim or other interior problems when I bought it. The quality of the leather (leather was discontinued in 2018) is clearly not as good as other luxury cars, however it doesn’t bother me in the slightest as I am more about how a car drives (instantaneous throttle responsiveness (as in you think and the car immediately reacts), buttery smooth power delivery, steering sharpness, handling for a big sedan, etc).



OTA

Over-the-Air updates (OTA) – I only noted the important updates/upgrades below (there have been 26 software updates to the car in the 2 years I’ve had the car. The Software OS went from 2019.20.4.2 to 2020.48.37.2).
  1. Sketchpad, Media volume and owner’s manual improvements
  2. Key fob security update
  3. Improvements to Auto Pilot and Maps.
  4. Spotify app added
  5. Scheduled departure added to schedule for home charging. This simply means that setup a schedule when you leave home and the car will be charged and warmed up (or cooled down) to coincide with your departure from home
  6. Automatic navigation – the car will automatically setup the navigation to your work address on weekdays when you leave around the time of your scheduled departure (noted in point above).
  7. Automatic wiper improvements – now uses one of the autopilot cameras to detect water drops on the windshield and adjusts the speed of the wipers according to your driving speed/and or intensity of rain/snow falling.
  8. Added a whole bunch of new voice commands and now reads out SMS
  9. Improved BT support
  10. Added nearby charging stations sorted by max charging power to the map
  11. Added number of available charging stations at superchargers in your vicinity. So if a charging station as 16 chargers and 10 are busy charging other Tesla’s you would see 6 as being available at that location.
  12. Added notifications that show up on your phone if any of the doors/windows was left open/not closed completely.
  13. Driving visualization improvements in the instrument cluster


Uncorking Procedure

One major software upgrade done to my car was the “uncorking” procedure when I had the car for less than a year (April 2020). This was basically a software unlock that increased the horsepower/torque by over 20%. That increased the horsepower to 476 Hp and dropped the 0-60 time from 5.2 seconds to 4.1 seconds. This was done for free by Tesla as soon as I found out that my car was upgradable. A mobile tech came to my house and connected his laptop to my car via the OBD2 port and an hour later, my car basically felt like a brand new completely different car. Not all 75D’s were upgradeable. I got lucky that mine already had the necessary hardware (some high power fuse).



Maintenance and other expenses
  1. April 2020 – Clean and lube brakes $150 CAD – this is a required annual maintenance item as the physical brakes don’t see much use (motor regen slows the car down 90% of the time) and especially in winter climates such as mine where salt and mud is dumped on the roads in the winter, it’s advisable to get the brakes cleaned as their life span gets reduced from all the muck that doesn’t always come off due to very little brake use. You can change a setting to reduce the regen, however once you are used to 1 pedal driving, having less regen kills some of the fun of the driving, so I always leave it at full regen.
  2. April 2021 – Clean and lube brakes - $150 CAD
  3. April 2021 – Cabin air filter replacement
  4. Total cost for electricity for driving 39.7k km/24.8k miles has been approximately $800 CAD
  5. I have deliberately not included the cost of a spare set of rims/tires for the winter as that has nothing to do with a Tesla specifically. Rough cost was $1500 CAD.


Summary

Pros

  • Tesla’s mastery of the EV drivetrain does need any more praise from me. Whenever I drive the car, I have this huge grin on my face and I don’t even have to be accelerating hard or anything like that – its just the amazingly smooth power delivery right-now-forward-motion (no fuel mixture to burn, no gears to change etc)
  • The Tesla supercharger network of course
  • The spaciousness of the hatchback Model S is just mind boggling. With the second row seats folded down, I can easily fit a twin sized mattress in the back (6.5 feet long by 35 inches wide space between the wheel wells)
  • Very low cost for maintenance and use (cheap electricity). I can’t help comparing it the cost of premium fuel for the GS400 that was easily $400/month vs $400/year now with the S
  • Excellent driving position (very comfortable/firm seats with excellent lumbar support)
  • Overall very good visibility with big windows other than the rear window (which is not such a big deal once you’ve had the car for a week or two)

Cons
  • Quality of fit and finish - any “review” of a Tesla is not complete without mentioning something about the quality of fit and finish as that seems to get a lot of folks emotions and feelings all over the place – my car has no loose trim or misalignment of any panels or uneven gaps except for some minor unevenness in the chrome trim around 2 of the doors.
  • Range - I wouldn’t necessarily classify this as a con, but it also gets a lot of folks up in arms – if I drive at a reasonable speed – 75 mph – I lose about 20% of the stated range as Tesla states their EPA at a steady 55 to 60 mph which understandably upsets a lot of people. It doesn’t bother me one bit as I know exactly how much range I will actually get and in the 2 years I’ve had it, I have never ever run out electrons nor has it ever caused me any inconvenience as my car is usually charged to 80% every day and range is a total non-issue as far as I am concerned. I get about 400 km (250 miles) on a full charge and I can hit that mileage without any issues if I drive at 110 kph (just under 70 mph)


Closing remarks

In short, if I could go back in time and buy the car all over again, I would do so without any hesitation whatsoever. The car is simply a blast to drive and costs almost zero $ to run – it’s such a no brainer to own one assuming you want and it makes financial sense to you. I paid about 50% off the MSRP for my used S which is about the average in depreciation for most “luxury” cars.

Recent pics

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Thanks for sharing this. Reshared on my TSLA Facebook group.
 

Ormond

Active Member
Jul 10, 2016
1,066
1,588
Central Florida
I enjoyed your summary of your ownership experience very much, especially the mention of the OTA updates and uncorking. I hope that you have continued good luck with your silver rocket.
 

WhiteWi

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Feb 21, 2021
434
177
Somewhere in Universe
Last November got 2016 Model S 75 August built. So far I had 5 warranty repairs. Lower grill replaced for newer version bc of the vibrations at speed, bubbly screen replaced with new one(later upgraded to MCU2 anyway), two back windows motors replaced, metal trim on the front door interior replaced bc it came apart at one end. Also Tesla goodwill alignment right after I got the car bc it was pulling to one side. Over all very happy with purchase and can’t wait for my cyber truck order to become available.
P.S.
But amount of the potential problems after warranty expires makes me little bit nervous.
 
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