TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker and becoming a Supporting Member. For more info: Support TMC
Start a Discussionhttps://teslamotorsclub.com/tmc/tags/

For Those Who Live Where UK English is Used

Discussion in 'Model S' started by wdolson, Mar 17, 2017.

Tags:
  1. wdolson

    wdolson Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2015
    Messages:
    3,979
    Location:
    Clark Co, WA
    Which is most of the English speaking world outside the US...

    I was just wondering the other day, wouldn't the storage compartment in the front of the car be called the "froot"?
     
  2. cpa

    cpa Active Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2014
    Messages:
    1,565
    Location:
    Central Valley
    I believe the rear is the boot and the front is the bonnet. At least that was what my '59 Morris Minor had. So, I would think that the proper term is fronnet, or frunnet, depending upon dialect.

    And, Teslas do not come with spare tyres, either.
     
    • Like x 1
  3. bmah

    bmah New Moderator, Model S / Model X Forums

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2015
    Messages:
    1,255
    Location:
    Lafayette, CA, USA
    I thought the bonnet was the cover for the (front) engine compartment, not the compartment itself. But I might be mistaken.

    For what it's worth, my wife grew up in Hong Kong and Australia and she calls the storage compartment at the front of our Tesla a frunk, even though she calls the compartment at the rear the boot. We just had this conversation the other day.

    Bruce.
     
  4. wdolson

    wdolson Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2015
    Messages:
    3,979
    Location:
    Clark Co, WA
    I have seen people in the UK and Australia refer to the front compartment as the frunk, though I was just thinking that it's inconsistent with UK English.
     
  5. majcina

    majcina Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2017
    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    Maryland
    The standard American answer to this question is, "It's made in America. You must follow American rules. USA! USA"

    IMG_1175.JPG
     
    • Funny x 4
  6. JonG

    JonG Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2015
    Messages:
    361
    Location:
    UK
    Some over here do call the frunk a froot.

    A trunk is what elephants have

    (Just don't come back and say a boot is what you put on your feet :)

    The car is also a hatch back. Do you call it a sedan or is that only 4 door cars without the rear glass opening with the tailgate (which we call a saloon)?
     
    • Like x 1
  7. wdolson

    wdolson Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2015
    Messages:
    3,979
    Location:
    Clark Co, WA
    Saloon and shooting brakes are terms not used for cars in the US. In the US a saloon is a type of drinking establishment, though a form that hasn't been common since the 1800s.

    Some might call the Model S a hatchback. It really fits into the fastback category, which is a term that went out of fashion at the end of the 1970s.
    List of fastback automobiles - Wikipedia
     
  8. Pezpunk

    Pezpunk Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2016
    Messages:
    246
    Location:
    Bristow, VA
    i think most just call it a sedan. generally, hatchbacks are smaller cars.
     
  9. cpa

    cpa Active Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2014
    Messages:
    1,565
    Location:
    Central Valley
    I really think Tesla should come out with their version of a touring car with optional isinglass windows.
     
  10. cpa

    cpa Active Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2014
    Messages:
    1,565
    Location:
    Central Valley
    Not trying to be smart, just trying to understand the language:

    Do you use the other definitions of trunk (trees, columns, anatomy, rail line, male swimwear [plural only], large carrying case) too?

    Asking for a friend. :rolleyes:
     
  11. MikeBur

    MikeBur ManualPilot

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2014
    Messages:
    744
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    I thought a sedan had to have a boot/trunk? A fastback is likely more appropriate

    Tree, swimwear yes.
    People > 90 maybe for large suitcase
    Trunk line, columns, no

    In general, though U.K. English has many differing words for the same thing, e.g. Something as simple as a deep fried, battered, potato slice might have to be ordered in native dialog at a fish and chips shop:
    Potato fritter
    Scallop
    Klondike
    Smack
    Scratch

    Oh, and for someone not trying to be smart, you're failing... ;). There's no spare tyres or tires in a Tesla. Two countries separated by irregular vowel movements :p
     
    • Funny x 1
  12. JonG

    JonG Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2015
    Messages:
    361
    Location:
    UK
    Trees yes
    Columns no
    Anatomy yes
    Rail line.. well any transport system might be a trunk line or trunk road, but used much less now
    Swimming trunks.. yep
    Suitcase.. not really.

    Not come across some of those deep fried good things either. A scallop is different to a chip as it's a slice if potato, covered in batter and fried. We have French fries and chips.. chips tend to be much thicker.

    But then we also have different words in different parts of the country for certain things. An example is a roundabout (a type of road junction) is called an island in some parts.

    I think it's great there's diversity in the language.
     
  13. green1

    green1 Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    4,550
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    I've always referred to the car as a "lift back sedan"

    But as a Canadian (we can't decide between UK and US english on most things) it's a frunk

    Considering frunk is really a tesla specific name (many vehicles have a front storage compartment that is not called a frunk) I've considered it more of it's own proper noun than as a shortening of 2 words.
     
  14. JonG

    JonG Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2015
    Messages:
    361
    Location:
    UK
    Yes, a hatchback doesn't really fit, but we're lacking a suitable universally adopted word. There are a few cars now, Audi a7, merc cls, Porsche Panamera, even an Aston Martin Rapide.
     
  15. Pezpunk

    Pezpunk Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2016
    Messages:
    246
    Location:
    Bristow, VA
    I'm not interested in arguing about what it should be called. The question was what we call it and the fact is most call it a sedan.
     
  16. Whitmarsh

    Whitmarsh Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2015
    Messages:
    189
    Location:
    Salisbury, UK
    Nor wheels (only Americans call a wheel & tyre combination a spare tire).
     
  17. Whitmarsh

    Whitmarsh Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2015
    Messages:
    189
    Location:
    Salisbury, UK
    No, no - in real English, we call it a saloon.
     
    • Like x 1
  18. Whitmarsh

    Whitmarsh Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2015
    Messages:
    189
    Location:
    Salisbury, UK
    Yes, you're right - it's the cover for the (engine) that's called the bonnet. A lot of people here call the compartment the frunk but that's because they've been immersed in American by all sorts of things (and, of course, the manual is not translated into proper English, so all the terms are in transatlantic colonial). I make a point of calling it the froot just to be bloody-minded.
     
    • Funny x 1
  19. NullException

    NullException Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2016
    Messages:
    150
    Location:
    UK
    I also like 'bonnet hole', as suggested by @Xenius of this parish.
     
  20. deonb

    deonb Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2013
    Messages:
    3,538
    Location:
    Redmond, WA
    Yes, it confused me to no end when I moved here initially and heard people talking about "rotating their tires" at home. And similarly when they put on "winter tires" when it starts snowing.

    I knew what it takes to put a tire on a rim and that's not something I thought a normal person ought be doing at home.

    Then again, people were also talking about running new cables through existing walls and it didn't seem like it involved a hammer and chisel.

    The 90's were a very confusing time for me...
     

Share This Page