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G Force for Tesla Model 3 Performance (0-60mph) and other Models

Maximilien

Member
Oct 25, 2016
753
671
Irvine, CA
I was searching for the G Force of the Model 3 acceleration as well as Model S 75D acceleration in Google and couldn't find it.

Then I realized that high school physics, kinematics, is all needed! Silly me!
You just have to be careful with unit conversion from mph to m/s.

For those who are curious how Model 3 accelerates in terms of G force, here it is:

V= Vi+at

Vi=0
a=V/t = (26.82 m/s) / 3.5s= 7.66 m/s^2
7.66/9.8 ~ -0.78g

But many people report they get 3.3. In that case,
8.13 m/s^2
8.13/9.8 ~ 0.83 g

83% of free fall acceleration is pretty impressive! Of course, it is no match against Model S at 2.28s, which gives 1.2g, faster than the free fall. That is just brutal!

For those who owns AWD and RWD, it turns out 0.61g (4.5s) and 0.54g (5.1s), respectively
Model S 75D/90D (4.2s) gets 0.65g. So AWD Model 3 and Model 75D/90D would be roughly feeling the similar acceleration. And Performance 3 and P85D (3.2s) may also be similar acceleration.

And finally, the Roadster 2020(1.9s) will get 1.44g. Speechless.

I never thought I would use high school physics in real life!
 

JeffK

Well-Known Member
Apr 27, 2016
6,997
6,930
Indianapolis
R1ysWTm.png
 

Knightshade

Well-Known Member
Jul 31, 2017
13,165
21,838
NC
actually there are quite a few people getting 3.1 seconds to 60 MPH without took out. Check YouTube.


I saw one guy cite 3.18...but he was definitely including rollout. If you've got a specific video in mind by all means post a link.

A lot of people on youtube probably don't know what their own devices measure though.
 

Knightshade

Well-Known Member
Jul 31, 2017
13,165
21,838
NC

JeffK

Well-Known Member
Apr 27, 2016
6,997
6,930
Indianapolis
Thank you for the graph. I didn't know the acceleration is quite stable until about 37mph.
There's some variation because I don't want to mount the dragy so I'm literally holding it in place on the arm rest as I'm launching to 60 mph steering with the other hand. Probably not the best approach.

There are also times where I forget and the dragy goes flying into the backseat.
 

icefree

Member
Apr 8, 2017
196
335
Northern VA
Yes, but that 2.95 seconds seem awful slow for P100D. Were you on Chill Mode or maybe not on Ludicrous Mode?
That's without the rollout, so it's closer to 2.7s for other comparisons. But it's actually very difficult to get it to the 2.5s time. Note my SoC was 62%, and I'm using really heavy aftermarket wheels, so not ideal. It would be best to be near a supercharger so you can heat up the battery, and top it off at 100% SoC, then do the launch runs.
 
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PARNY

Member
Aug 28, 2017
38
52
Roslyn, NY
I was searching for the G Force of the Model 3 acceleration as well as Model S 75D acceleration in Google and couldn't find it.

Then I realized that high school physics, kinematics, is all needed! Silly me!
You just have to be careful with unit conversion from mph to m/s.

For those who are curious how Model 3 accelerates in terms of G force, here it is:

V= Vi+at

Vi=0
a=V/t = (26.82 m/s) / 3.5s= 7.66 m/s^2
7.66/9.8 ~ -0.78g

But many people report they get 3.3. In that case,
8.13 m/s^2
8.13/9.8 ~ 0.83 g

83% of free fall acceleration is pretty impressive! Of course, it is no match against Model S at 2.28s, which gives 1.2g, faster than the free fall. That is just brutal!

For those who owns AWD and RWD, it turns out 0.61g (4.5s) and 0.54g (5.1s), respectively
Model S 75D/90D (4.2s) gets 0.65g. So AWD Model 3 and Model 75D/90D would be roughly feeling the similar acceleration. And Performance 3 and P85D (3.2s) may also be similar acceleration.

And finally, the Roadster 2020(1.9s) will get 1.44g. Speechless.

I never thought I would use high school physics in real life!


You are assuming that the car accelerates at the same rate from 0 to 60. I have seen in other posts that the initial acceleration is much greater then falls off so that maximum G force is well over the average.
 

Maximilien

Member
Oct 25, 2016
753
671
Irvine, CA
You are assuming that the car accelerates at the same rate from 0 to 60. I have seen in other posts that the initial acceleration is much greater then falls off so that maximum G force is well over the average.

True. I just oversimplified the scenario and that equation only works assuming the acceleration is constant.

As you can see @icefree's diagram, it is not constant but it gives us some sense of the overall/average acceleration.
 
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Shake Shinde

Member
Oct 5, 2019
37
23
Pittsburgh
V= Vi+at

Vi=0
a=V/t = (26.82 m/s) / 3.5s= 7.66 m/s^2
7.66/9.8 ~ -0.78g

But many people report they get 3.3. In that case,
8.13 m/s^2
8.13/9.8 ~ 0.83 g
Another area this information is useful is for those who buy those ridiculous 'all weather' floor mats because they have a 'high edge' to contain the melted water in the winter, lol.

I wonder how 'gingerly' one has to drive their car with a puddle of water in their 'all weather' floor mats to keep it from spilling over onto the interior carpet. I estimated something like less than 0.2g, lol.

My recommendation, click your heels before getting in the car and let physics evaporate the water in a low humidity environment...
 

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