Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

LFP to 100% Each Week—Assumptions?

As for me keeping a high SOC for emergency situations, it's an probability thing. The chances that I'll unexpectedly need a lot of range are very low. The benefit of a lower SOC is higher.
We just drove my 2022 TM3 RWD, 2032 miles and just arrived at our SE Arizona home. We've been here for 4 hours and the grid power to the whole valley just failed. $h*T happens. Luckily we have about a 50% SOC, but our car may be our refuge depending on how long this lasts.

We're in Portal AZ (Cochise County) Here's the outage map:

 
Last edited:
We just drove my 2022 TM3 RWD, 2032 miles and just arrived at our SE Arizona home. We've been here for 4 hours and the grid power to the whole valley just failed. $h*T happens. Luckily we have about a 50% SOC, but our car may be our refuge depending on how long this lasts.

We're in Portal AZ (Cochise County) Here's the outage map:

The power came back on after about 4 hours. I neglected to mention, in my quoted post, that an apparent lightning strike over the summer, when we were gone, fried all the GFI plugs in the garage and the garage door opener. Fortunately, the exterior GFI plug by the garage survived and I was able to get charging going through that. We also lost all the electronics in our family room/theatre room, despite them being unplugged.
 
Here's a cautionary tale: I have a Macbook that I rarely use. Thinking to keep the batter healthy, I got it to around 50% SOC, and set up a timer to charge it one minute per week (determined empirically). That kept it close to 50%, and it's been like that for maybe a year.

Today I needed the laptop, and started using it. After 15 minutes, BAM, it crashed. For a while I thought it was bricked. I plugged it in and saw that the SOC was 1%.

I'm guessing the Macbook's BMS was misestimating.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DuncanM

stopcrazypp

Well-Known Member
Dec 8, 2007
13,505
10,038
Here's a cautionary tale: I have a Macbook that I rarely use. Thinking to keep the batter healthy, I got it to around 50% SOC, and set up a timer to charge it one minute per week (determined empirically). That kept it close to 50%, and it's been like that for maybe a year.

Today I needed the laptop, and started using it. After 15 minutes, BAM, it crashed. For a while I thought it was bricked. I plugged it in and saw that the SOC was 1%.

I'm guessing the Macbook's BMS was misestimating.
I think it is because you used a manual method of maintaining the charge and if power consumption varied, your method can accumulate errors. My Lenovo Thinkpad instead has a way to set a upper and lower limit and keep it between that. I wish more devices allowed that (including Android; it's possible with rooting, but not on stock).
 

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top