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Minor Paint Issues turned Major

Crap, that’s terrible. You have every right to be angry - or furious! Will they not provide you with a loaner at this point? If there was ever a reason for a loaner, you’ve got one! Tesla should be ashamed with the paint job. The whole car is f’d up?

I agree with Nogasmn, you will most likely get a better painted car than ever possible from the factory. If its getting escalated to a regional manager, thats about as high as you likely can go and still get someone who understands the problem. Corporate tends to be about policy. I would definitely keep after all of them.

Document everything should this go south. If you’ve had it four times in the shop for the same thing (paint) then you are good for a lemon law claim. I wouldn’t go for a lemon law claim, but it’s good leverage as Tesla doesn’t need the bad rep this will add to regarding fit and finish.

But definitely yell for a loaner. Tesla owes you - and no car for 3 weeks is a PITA. Good luck.
That's not how the lemon law works.
 
That's not how the lemon law works.

In California, the lemon law is triggered at 4 times in the shop for the same problem or 30 days total time in the shop. It does not have to be for a dangerous defect - it can be for any defect.

A dangerous defect (like bad braking system, etc.) can be as little as 2 times in the shop. It does not go to court - but rather arbitration specifically designed for lemon law cases. Most manufacturers fight back very hard. On the other hand, if you win, you get all of your legal fees paid (which is why many attorneys will take a promising case on a contingency basis).

This is a case of a serious lemon - not dangerous, but pretty obviously defective. The dealer or its agents can try and try to fix it, but the provisions of the lemon law have time limits nevertheless. You can use or leverage the "lemon law" possibility with the dealer/manufacturer.

I had a lemon about 10 years ago and had my family attorney just talk to the dealer and manufacturer (i.e. - never went to arbitration). The dealer and manufacturer backed off and gave me a new car. California has the most comprehensive and customer friendly lemon laws in the US.
 
In California, the lemon law is triggered at 4 times in the shop for the same problem or 30 days total time in the shop. It does not have to be for a dangerous defect - it can be for any defect.

A dangerous defect (like bad braking system, etc.) can be as little as 2 times in the shop. It does not go to court - but rather arbitration specifically designed for lemon law cases. Most manufacturers fight back very hard. On the other hand, if you win, you get all of your legal fees paid (which is why many attorneys will take a promising case on a contingency basis).

This is a case of a serious lemon - not dangerous, but pretty obviously defective. The dealer or its agents can try and try to fix it, but the provisions of the lemon law have time limits nevertheless. You can use or leverage the "lemon law" possibility with the dealer/manufacturer.

I had a lemon about 10 years ago and had my family attorney just talk to the dealer and manufacturer (i.e. - never went to arbitration). The dealer and manufacturer backed off and gave me a new car. California has the most comprehensive and customer friendly lemon laws in the US.

It's going to have to be something that substantially effects the safety or value of the vehicle.

If the OP wants to lemon law the vehicle they should retain an attorney.
 
It's going to have to be something that substantially effects the safety or value of the vehicle.

If the OP wants to lemon law the vehicle they should retain an attorney.
A totally botched paint job kind of affects the value of the vehicle. It is so bad that Tesla is having the vehicle totally repainted.

Actually, in California, it doesn't have to be very substantial. It has to be a defect in the vehicle that has some function. Lemon Laws vary in each state. California is the most pro-consumer - and I think it was Illinois that had the least consumer oriented laws. It's always best to hire an attorney.
 
Wanted to share a similar issue I had with our 2020 Model X. I'll try to make a long story as short as possible. At delivery, we had some paint issues on the back left lower quarter panel and some other issues on the back bumper. This also was noted on the due bill and we made the decision to take delivery and keep the car with the hope that Tesla would take care of the problem.

Took the car in three weeks ago and we were eventually told that they couldn't fix the issues on the back bumper, they had to completely repaint the rear bumper. After about 2 weeks the car was ready and when I went to inspect it, the rear bumper looked worse than when we dropped it off! There were a minimum of 6 places where there was dust/dirt under the clear coat that was clearly visible. The car is white, so this certainly makes them more visible, but still. Not to mention that the colors were pretty obviously not a good match. On top of that, they had scratched the back left tail light and rear hitch! Needless to say, I was furious. Told the service manager I wasn't sure I even wanted the car any longer, but we struck a deal to try and let the body shop fix it again.

Fast forward one week, I go back (mind you, it's 100 miles each way for me to get to the local Tesla 'dealership') after the service manager says that the car is ready and "I inspected it and didn't see any issues you should be concerned with". I got on site on a Saturday morning and, upon inspection, there was STILL debris visible under the clear coat of the paint and the color difference between the bumper and the quarter panel is visibly different. In fact, one of the areas I pointed out to them was not even fixed during the 2nd visit to the body shop.

My wife and I absolutely love the car, but I'm fit to be tied at this point. I feel like all of these issues have diminished the value of a brand new car, and I'm waiting to hear back from them as to what the solution to the problem might be. I've told them as much and stated that we'd like to have a new vehicle, but I don't have much hope this will happen. I don't want any more repairs done by a local body shop, to be sure. Maybe take a factory painted bumper replacement? But that doesn't give me much comfort with all of Tesla's documented paint issues.

I've threatened the lemon law as a previous poster has suggested and I think may end up having a case. We are in WV and the lemon law kicks in after 30 days in the shop or three attempts to fix the same issue.

Appreciate all of the good advice above and just wanted to share our story with everyone, for better or for worse.
 

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