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mobile vs wall charger?

dschultz

New Member
Nov 15, 2021
3
2
California
Hi all, total newb here. My Model Y is on order... I'm wondering what the Wall Charger provides over the supplied Tesla charger (with the 14-50 adapter)?

I don't care much about maximizing charging rates since our daily use is pretty minimal. We have a Nissan Leaf now that serves local driving needs and the supplied charger (6.6kW) is more than adequate. The Model Y will replace the Leaf.

I have a 14-50 outlet in the garage that is used to charge the Leaf. For whatever reason, when that plug was installed the electrician put it on 30A breakers. I run a 25' extension cord from the outlet to the Nissan charger, then under the garage door to the car.

So... I believe I could just plug in the Mobile Charger the same way and call it a day. Is there any reason to go with the Wall Charger? (And the expense of upgrading wiring, etc.) What does the wifi connectivity buy me?

Thanks in advance for any help.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
4,321
4,477
Maryland
The Wall Connector is designed to be hard wired so you would need to change out your 14-50 receptacle for a junction box/mount for the Wall Connector or else install a new circuit.

The latest Gen3 Wall Connector has a 24 ft charging cord; the Gen2 Mobile Connector charging cord is ~18 ft in length.

You should find out why your existing circuit has a 30A breaker. To be correct the breaker for a 14-50 receptacle needs to be 40A (allowed by code) or else the 50A breaker.

You can set the maximum charging amperage from the Tesla vehicle's charging screen and from the Tesla app, should remember this setting for the location.
 
I have a 14-50 outlet in the garage that is used to charge the Leaf. For whatever reason, when that plug was installed the electrician put it on 30A breakers. I run a 25' extension cord from the outlet to the Nissan charger, then under the garage door to the car.
I worry your electrician put in wires limited to 30A (actually 24A for EV charging, since it is constant load). Getting to the bottom of that question is higher priority than wall charger vs. mobile charger, IMHO.
 
Three years ago I was faced with the same question. I decided to use the mobile connector which comes with the car but it turned out to be unreliable. It would, frequently, stop charging. But, that was 3 years ago and Tesla may have improved the reliability of the mobile connector since then.
 

EmbersDC

Member
Aug 5, 2021
111
145
DC
I've only had my Model Y for a week, but so far the mobile charging cord is more than enough. Each day I've driven between 20-50 miles. Yesterday I drove 60 miles.

Got home at 5pm. Plugged in. As of 8am this morning my Y was at 100%. I average 35-40 miles per day and I charge at least 12 hours a night so that's 48 miles of recharge per night. This keeps me topped off everyday. Even if it doesn't I calculated from Friday to Saturday (I don't drive much on Saturday) my Y will charge over 150 miles (at the minimum) on weekends. But, most likely 200 miles on weekends.

I also purchased another mobile charger to keep in my car just in case.
 
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jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
4,321
4,477
Maryland
I've only had my Model Y for a week, but so far the mobile charging cord is more than enough. Each day I've driven between 20-50 miles. Yesterday I drove 60 miles.

Got home at 5pm. Plugged in. As of 8am this morning my Y was at 100%. I average 35-40 miles per day and I charge at least 12 hours a night so that's 48 miles of recharge per night. This keeps me topped off everyday. Even if it doesn't I calculated from Friday to Saturday (I don't drive much on Saturday) my Y will charge over 150 miles (at the minimum) on weekends. But, most likely 200 miles on weekends.

I also purchased another mobile charger to keep in my car just in case.
For the long term health of the Tesla Model Y's battery you should only charge to 100% if needed when taking a road trip. The rest of the time you should only charge to 90% maximum for daily driving. You can set any charge limit you like between 60% and 90% with no worries.
 

EmbersDC

Member
Aug 5, 2021
111
145
DC
For the long term health of the Tesla Model Y's battery you should only charge to 100% if needed when taking a road trip. The rest of the time you should only charge to 90% maximum for daily driving. You can set any charge limit you like between 60% and 90% with no worries.
I don't charge to 100%. I charge to 85%. When I said "100%" I meant it was at the max charge set.
 
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I've only had my Model Y for a week, but so far the mobile charging cord is more than enough. Each day I've driven between 20-50 miles. Yesterday I drove 60 miles.

Got home at 5pm. Plugged in. As of 8am this morning my Y was at 100%. I average 35-40 miles per day and I charge at least 12 hours a night so that's 48 miles of recharge per night. This keeps me topped off everyday. Even if it doesn't I calculated from Friday to Saturday (I don't drive much on Saturday) my Y will charge over 150 miles (at the minimum) on weekends. But, most likely 200 miles on weekends.

I also purchased another mobile charger to keep in my car just in case.
Are you charging at 120V? 240V (at any amperage) is more efficient (less power lost to voltage conversion, I guess) than 120V. There are threads on this site about this. You might want to at least put in a 240V plug even for use with the mobile charger…
 

dduffey

Member
Aug 26, 2015
434
371
Austin, TX
I worry your electrician put in wires limited to 30A (actually 24A for EV charging, since it is constant load). Getting to the bottom of that question is higher priority than wall charger vs. mobile charger, IMHO.

Agree, get a different electrician. No way they should have put a 14-50 on a 30 amp breaker, who knows what the wiring is. I suspect that they didn't run the right gauge of wiring to cheap out.

I would give further advice/options but this is potentially a fire just waiting to happen. If not you, the next owner.

Using the extension cord is also problematic because if the wiring in the outlet is overheating the charger won't know.
 
Are you charging at 120V? 240V (at any amperage) is more efficient (less power lost to voltage conversion, I guess) than 120V. There are threads on this site about this. You might want to at least put in a 240V plug even for use with the mobile charger…
He said he's using the mobile charger with a NEMA 14-50 adapter, so it must be 240 V. My understanding is that because the outlet is on a 30 Amp circuit he's charging at 240 V / 24 Amps, thus getting ~5.7 kW.
 

EmbersDC

Member
Aug 5, 2021
111
145
DC
Are you charging at 120V? 240V (at any amperage) is more efficient (less power lost to voltage conversion, I guess) than 120V. There are threads on this site about this. You might want to at least put in a 240V plug even for use with the mobile charger…
I'm charging off a standard 110V at four miles/hour. I charge as least 12 hours a night (normally 15 hours). Not plans on changing. Plus, there is a charging station next to my office if I actually need to top off. My Y charges 60 miles per night. Average drive per day is 30-40 miles.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
4,321
4,477
Maryland
I'm charging off a standard 110V at four miles/hour. I charge as least 12 hours a night (normally 15 hours). Not plans on changing. Plus, there is a charging station next to my office if I actually need to top off. My Y charges 60 miles per night. Average drive per day is 30-40 miles.
120V charging is less efficient than 240V charging. (75% to 80% for 120V versus 90% to 95% for 240V.) Over a month it might save you $2 or so; $25 to $30 per year. It would take many years for the savings of charging using a 240V charging circuit to pay off but you would have the benefit of being able to charge faster or charge two EVs in the time you now charge one EV.
 

EmbersDC

Member
Aug 5, 2021
111
145
DC
120V charging is less efficient than 240V charging. (75% to 80% for 120V versus 90% to 95% for 240V.) Over a month it might save you $2 or so; $25 to $30 per year. It would take many years for the savings of charging using a 240V charging circuit to pay off but you would have the benefit of being able to charge faster or charge two EVs in the time you now charge one EV.
Thank you for the information. My Tesla is leased. If I were to install a new outlet it would cost $200-$300 just for the technician to come and install it. If the cost savings is only $25 annually, I'll continue to use the 110V for 36 months.

However, if I decide to purchase a Tesla I would install a charger at home. But, at this time it's not needed as my office has charging stations if I need to top off.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
4,321
4,477
Maryland
Thank you for the information. My Tesla is leased. If I were to install a new outlet it would cost $200-$300 just for the technician to come and install it. If the cost savings is only $25 annually, I'll continue to use the 110V for 36 months.

However, if I decide to purchase a Tesla I would install a charger at home. But, at this time it's not needed as my office has charging stations if I need to top off.
If you can charge at your office then that would be the most economical way to drive any EV. You could flip things around and make charging at the office your normal charging routine, charge at home on the weekend and as needed.

You don't have to charge every day; Tesla states that you should leave your Tesla vehicle plugged in but Tesla don't state that you have to be charging all of the time. You can choose to charge every other day, or not at all on the weekend, depending on your driving needs.
 

Sophias_dad

Active Member
Supporting Member
Jul 29, 2018
1,865
2,061
Massachusetts
If you can charge at your office then that would be the most economical way to drive any EV. You could flip things around and make charging at the office your normal charging routine, charge at home on the weekend and as needed.

You don't have to charge every day; Tesla states that you should leave your Tesla vehicle plugged in but Tesla don't state that you have to be charging all of the time. You can choose to charge every other day, or not at all on the weekend, depending on your driving needs.
I'll second this. For the first two years of ownership I almost exclusively charged at my office even though I had installed an HPWC at home. I certainly could have, and probably should have, just used the UMC hung off a 20x240 circuit from a nearby subpanel. I'd charge to 90% at work and go a day or two(potentially even three) before charging again(at work)
 

goin2drt

Member
Nov 25, 2021
117
156
Kentucky
This was informative as I am also new and was wondering the same question as OP. I was either going to have the electrician install a standard 14-50 outlet or do the Tesla WC as he was trying to talk me into that.

Seems like the miles charged per hr would not be a deal breaker from a WC to the plug that comes with the car using the adapter to charge at 14-50. The only real benefit of spending the extra $550 is the cool factor but not much more if the added miles don't matter.
 

Earl

Member
Jan 22, 2014
315
392
USA
Cheapest solution: use your Leaf charger with the J-1772-to-Tesla adapter that comes with your car and dial down the charging current to 24 amps or less. Cost = $0
Easy solution: get 14-50 adapter for Tesla Mobile Connector that comes with your car and dial down the charging current to 24 amps or less. Cost = $45
Another easy SAFE solution: Replace 14-50 outlet with 14-30 outlet and purchase a 14-30 adapter for the Tesla Mobile Connector. Cost = ~$100 (outlet and adapter)
BEST solution: Have a good electrician check your wiring and install a 14-30 or 14-50 depending on what the wiring can handle, then purchase the appropriate Tesla Mobile Connector adapter for the outlet. Cost = ~$500 (depending on what electrician finds)
I've been mostly using the Tesla Mobile Connector with a NEMA 14-50 since 2008 (actually, 2000 but it was a home-brewed EV1 charger with a 14-50 outlet and there was that gap after GM destroyed our EV1 and before Tesla delivered our Roadster). The Wall connector is faster but I seldom bother to move the cars to get to it. We've probably used it 10 times in 13 years.
 
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