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Model "S" P100D Range at Wide Open Throttle?

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by Pantera Dude, Jan 8, 2017.

  1. Pantera Dude

    Pantera Dude Member

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    Someone out there must have a pretty good idea? This is assuming no wind or wet roads and no elevation gain or loss. How much of that range would likely be at the 155 mph limit before, (or if), the electronics reduced speed to protect the battery or other hardware? I hope it would go farther than the first Bugatti Veyron's that would empty their tank in 12 minutes at 253 mph for a "whopping" range of 51 miles!
     
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  2. FastLoose

    FastLoose Member

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    Could be worth the time to compute this, but would only be theoretical. I find that I can hammer on my s p100d for maybe 1-3 minutes before the battery starts to overheat and power is cut. When I am in that mode I am easily burning 3 miles or more of charge for every mile driven.

    I wish they had a better way to keep that better cold! I noticed with the p100d that at high speeds and big battery usage the regenerative braking shuts off, so perhaps an attempt to keep the battery more cool by not pushing electrons back in.

    As it stands though, if you are out on a track with this thing, you will get beat by the likes of the ford focus and dodge dart, so a high performance sedan it is not (only for short distances and at least in usual driving situations the car is unbeatable by nearly anything you will ever encounter on the road).
     
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  3. LargeHamCollider

    LargeHamCollider Battery cells != scalable

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    If you were to line up on a road and hold the pedal to the metal until the battery died, you'd get to 155mph pretty quick and then you'd be limited to about 140 after a few minutes, I'd guess you would get over 100 miles probably around 145, don't have the time to do a proper analysis but am reasonably confident of my guess.
     
  4. Pantera Dude

    Pantera Dude Member

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    Yeah, I knew it wasn't going to be a track toy, but what it does, it does VERY well. LOL
    Thank you guys!
     
  5. lmaccaro

    lmaccaro Member

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    To add to this.. it is a very drivable supercar. You can commute every day in it, you can hand it to your mother in law to run to the store, and you can beat every production car ever made off the line. Oh, then you can haul the kids to hockey with a trunk full of hockey gear. That is the true beauty of it to me.
     
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  6. Zetopan

    Zetopan Member

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    There are a number of ways to solve this and here is an example where I round the calculated results to about 2 significant decimal digits. This also assumes level ground, no wind, no other drain on the motive power battery, and no throttling due to over-heating of the motors or battery.

    Based on the following physics: P ~ V^3 (Power is proportional to Velocity Cubed), at 70 MPH the nominal range of the P100D is 307 miles (from the Tesla website). For convenience we will assume that the 100 KWh of the battery is all available to the user. 307 / 70 = 4.4 hours of driving time and that consumes 100 KWh. Since power is proportional to the cube of velocity the driving time has to drop by a factor that is the cube of 155 / 70, which is about 10.9 and that results in 0.4 hours. That 0.4 hours times the 155 MPH top speed is 62 miles.

    As a simple check: 100 KWh / 4.4 h = 23 KW. 100 KWh / 0.4 h = 250 KW. 250 KW / 23 KW = 10.9. 10.9**(1/3) = 2.2 and 2.2 * 70 = 155. So if no throttling occurred the driving time would be 2X longer than the Veyron (24 minutes vs 12) but the range would be quite similar (62 miles vs 51). The Tesla is also consuming 1/3 the power of the Veyron (250 KW vs 750) when both are operating at their top speeds (155 MPH vs 253).
     
  7. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

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    That's incorrect. It's true the Model S is consuming 250 kW, but the Veyron is consuming much more. The gas tank is 100 liters or 910 kWh. When the tank is emptied in 12 minutes, that's a consumption of 4,550 kW.

    It's more correct to say the Veyron is outputting 750 kW. (Or something similar.)
     
  8. Zetopan

    Zetopan Member

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    You are absolutely correct. I was actually comparing something much closer to the power outputs rather than the power inputs. The Veyron is likely to be closer to 30% thermally efficient, while the Tesla is at least 80% and may even approach 90%. Thanks for pointing that difference out.
     
  9. bcampbelllds

    bcampbelllds Member

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    Couldn't agree more. The MS is great drag strip car, poor track car after a few laps. I'm in north Texas and recently raced my P85D on a 2.5 mile course. After the second lap the car would reduce power to about 200Kw. The first two laps were pure fun. The cars AWD does great. Only car that was faster that day was a Nissan GTR. A Hellcat on the track couldn't keep up through the turns. The brakes are really undersized for track use. Felt soft after one lap, but expected due the the cars weight. Probably won't ever take this car to a track again. Each 15 minute session would drain the battery 20%-25%. Still the best car I have ever owed.



     
  10. trond.strom

    trond.strom Member

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    I believe this is one of the reasons future Hypercars are going to be electric. For the Veyron it consumes 4500kW and delivers 750kW a diffrence of 3750 kW. This is mostly heat and needs to be removed from the engine. Dissipating 4+MW in an object as small as a car is a daunting task
     
  11. Zetopan

    Zetopan Member

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    "Dissipating 4+MW in an object as small as a car is a daunting task."

    The engine alone has 3 radiators, the transmission has another radiator, the hydraulics have another radiator, etc. There are 10 radiators in all.
     

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