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MPP Comfort Coilover reviews?

M3RideHeight

Member
Sep 29, 2019
25
13
SF Bay Area
Hi everyone, can someone confirm if this is the toe adjustment on the rear for the model 3? I saw this one on YouTube. Thanks for any input.
 

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dfwatt

Active Member
Sep 24, 2018
3,087
5,098
FL
Thanks for the reply. You will have to excuse my ignorance because a lot of this is new for me. What I was able to understand is that the lowering will create a camber bringing in the top of the wheel. As I understood through some of my reading, the articulation of the two arms coming up actually brings in the wheel as well. So that if I adjusted camber to essentially be like stock; than the wheels would actually come in a bit. Am I mistaken? Or is that what you are trying to tell me. I have the P3D- with which I also understand to have about 5mm extended rotors over the P3D PUP. I do like my wheels but the poke is bothersome especially since the back appears to be perfect to me. I'm running a square setup. I know everyone has their "taste." But essentially I'm looking for ways to bring in the wheel a bit and keep the rims. MPP coilovers was one theory. And then perhaps the MPP rotors will change things as well...although I haven't reasearched that.

You mentioned RB rotors, wasn't sure what that was... Also you mentioned 38 and 40 offset wheels, both of which will bring the wheel in compared to my 35 wheel. Am I pretty much stuck living with poke? Is there a way to compensate? I even considered picking up some PUP rotors if they come up on ebay to gain a little more tuck?

Or after all this, do I need to run staggered if it's going to bother me.

Thanks and sorry for the f/u ?'s.

RB stands for Racing Brake. They make a rotor similar to MPPs, with improved cooling and replacable disks - you keep the hat and just buys the blank disks. Both MPP and RB aftermarket brake disks have thicker rotor hats, very much like the stock brake hat on the non-performance brake cars. That's why the performance brake cars have lesser offset, they have thinner rotor hats, while the other non-P brake cars have 5 mm more positve offset in the stock OEM wheel (positive offset moves the wheel inboard - yes I know that's counterintutitive!).

This just means that with the aftermarket rotors you have about the same situation as non-P brake cars, in terms of room. Biggest problem is the front spindle clearance. That is the limiting factor in superwide wheels and tires, which forces you to move the wheel and tire slightly outboard, which creates, in the parlance, 'poke', and, more drag. Some like the more outboard look, some don't.
 

FlyNavy01

Member
Apr 30, 2017
425
894
Jacksonville, FL
The ride height doesn't affect the ride unless you are at the extremes of adjustment
Using the 15mm measurements for both the front and rear spring perches as recommended on your website for the Sports AWD Coilovers results in the front being 20mm higher than the rears (380mm hub-to-fender vs 360mm hub-to-fender).

I was looking for a 30mm overall drop (115mm battery ground clearance) and while the rears are exactly there, it appears I'll only be able to get 25mm max drop in the front if I lower the front spring perches all the way to the bottom of the threads on the strut. I don't like reverse rake so I'll likely raise the rears 5mm to match.

If I had known this I would've used the tender springs as opposed to the aluminum spacers, but given that I just spent many hours installing it all in my garage I don't really feel like pulling it apart again right now.

Do you know how exactly the ride will be negatively impacted by being at that extreme of the adjustment range? I'm a bit disappointed there aren't more threads for further adjustability.

EDIT: Apologies this is in the comfort coilovers thread, I just saw this and got curious how my ride will be affected for being lowered all the way up front and wanted to ask the question here as opposed to email for other's benefit as well.
 
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MountainPass

Vendor
Mar 2, 2018
1,431
2,814
Toronto, Canada
Using the 15mm measurements for both the front and rear spring perches as recommended on your website for the Sports AWD Coilovers results in the front being 20mm higher than the rears (380mm hub-to-fender vs 360mm hub-to-fender).

I was looking for a 30mm overall drop (115mm battery ground clearance) and while the rears are exactly there, it appears I'll only be able to get 25mm max drop in the front if I lower the front spring perches all the way to the bottom of the threads on the strut. I don't like reverse rake so I'll likely raise the rears 5mm to match.

If I had known this I would've used the tender springs as opposed to the aluminum spacers, but given that I just spent many hours installing it all in my garage I don't really feel like pulling it apart again right now.

Do you know how exactly the ride will be negatively impacted by being at that extreme of the adjustment range? I'm a bit disappointed there aren't more threads for further adjustability.

EDIT: Apologies this is in the comfort coilovers thread, I just saw this and got curious how my ride will be affected for being lowered all the way up front and wanted to ask the question here as opposed to email for other's benefit as well.

Sending you an email! The ride quality is the same at the lowest setting.
 

dfwatt

Active Member
Sep 24, 2018
3,087
5,098
FL
Thanks! Is the toe adjustment to the front is by the the tie rod? Also if I just want to correct the camber on the rear to save tires all I need to buy is the camber kit? No need for the rear toe kit?

Only toe in is adjustable on the stock suspension both front and rear. But the rear toe arms are way easier to work with than the clunky and eventually Rusty cam drive on the rear toe arm. I recommend if you can afford it getting both the rear toe and Camber arms just because of how much easier it is to actually get an alignment with those installed. If you lower the car a little over an inch will get to about one degree negative on the front, which is good for Street driving but is not enough for track. So if you're tracking you probably want to get the front a-arm which allows adjustable camber in front. Pretty sure that front toe is done by classic tie rod mechanism.
 
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M3RideHeight

Member
Sep 29, 2019
25
13
SF Bay Area
Only toe in is adjustable on the stock suspension both front and rear. But the rear toe arms are way easier to work with than the clunky and eventually Rusty cam drive on the rear toe arm. I recommend if you can afford it getting both the rear toe and Camber arms just because of how much easier it is to actually get an alignment with those installed. If you lower the car a little over an inch will get to about one degree negative on the front, which is good for Street driving but is not enough for track. So if you're tracking you probably want to get the front a-arm which allows adjustable camber in front. Pretty sure that front toe is done by classic tie rod mechanism.
So in other words if I will never track the car and just wanted a lowered stance but just wanted even tire wear, can I get away with rear camber kit only Without toe kit?
 

MountainPass

Vendor
Mar 2, 2018
1,431
2,814
Toronto, Canada
So in other words if I will never track the car and just wanted a lowered stance but just wanted even tire wear, can I get away with rear camber kit only Without toe kit?
@dfwatt pretty much covered everything! He ordered the Toe Arms a few months after installing the Camber Arms, so I think he speaks from the experience of having rather done them both at once.
 
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dfwatt

Active Member
Sep 24, 2018
3,087
5,098
FL
So in other words if I will never track the car and just wanted a lowered stance but just wanted even tire wear, can I get away with rear camber kit only Without toe kit?

Yes until the cam bolt gets rusty you basically have the same functionality. So on a new car you're fine with just a camber arm kit at the rear. Most alignment guys report however that the cam bolt often times is very hard to adjust in fine increments whereas the MPP toe arms are exquisitely adjustable. Another Plus that is not talked about is you're dropping a couple pounds of unsprung weight. Whether that's worth it or not is an individual decision but for me between the unsprung weight and the vast ease of alignment compared to the stock setup, it was a no-brainer. Last but not least the build quality on the MPP arms is about as good as it gets.
 

dfwatt

Active Member
Sep 24, 2018
3,087
5,098
FL
@MountainPass, status on when the hybrid coilovers will be released?

You can probably check the Forum but I think they indicated they're they're just waiting for stuff from KW. There may have been a post on this one already. In other words that maybe no longer a wait than the current wait for the sports coilovers.
 

skrtskrt

Member
Sep 30, 2018
558
131
USA/EU
I've been running the MP Comfort Coilovers with toe and camber arms for about 6 days. I haven't been able to take a long trip with them yet, but I have purposely driven over rough roads that would rattle some teeth and give backaches to my wife when using the UP moderate springs it replaced. It's night and day, the comfort coilovers just soak up rough roads like they weren't even there. Think of riding over potholes as a slight massage vs being kicked in the butt. I find myself sometimes driving faster than normal because it's so smooth and comfortable. It's the same feeling you get when you drive fast because you don't hear the engine, you drive faster because you don't feel the bumps. I have a family of five and with everyone in the car, the UP springs were just painful over bumps, but it was bearable with one person in the car. With the MP comfort coilovers, five passengers isn't an issue.

This is more luxury. My wife says the ride is a lot softer than when it was stock. First thing I noticed was a little bit more body roll than with the UP moderates. MP told me that's because it has more travel vs the UP springs which were riding on the bump stops under pressure. I have the height on the coilovers a little higher than the manual recommneded, but will probably bring it down another 1/2" after it settles in a month. It was set higher because the car was scraping at a couple places with the UP moderates so I wanted to raise it just a bit. So far no scrapes, but the height is aesthetically a little too high for my taste on a lowered car. Great thing about the coilovers is that the height is adjustable.

After comparing the ride to my wife's Lexus SUV, I find it similar in the way it softens bumps, maybe even a little smoother and it doesn't exhibit nearly as much body roll as a SUV does.

I don't plan to track my car as I only have a LRWD. If I had dual or performance, I'd probably have gone with the sport coilovers to tune the dampers and take it to the track. Since I use this as a daily driver and do a ton of road trips, the comfort coilovers feel like the perfect balance of comfort and performance for my needs. My family concurs.

Install was done by Griffin Motorwerke in Berkeley, CA.
View attachment 365745 View attachment 365744 View attachment 365737

I wonder if this is only for RWD that gets more body roll? Because I've notice those with AWD say there's slightly less body roll with the comforts.
 

skrtskrt

Member
Sep 30, 2018
558
131
USA/EU
Here is my review of the MPP Comfort Coilovers...

I had the MPP comfort coilovers installed about three weeks ago by my local shop in Santa Barbara - HP Autosport. Harold @ HP is super knowledgeable and helpful and does great work.

I took delivery of my LR RWD in April 2018 on the gen-2 factory suspension. Ride quality and handling were decent, but the fender gaps were much higher than my liking for a sport sedan. I then had the T sportline lowering springs installed by HP Autosport last August. While the ride quality was generally better on slow compression bumps, it was much worse on fast compression bumps and divots, even lane line reflectors on the freeway were jarring. I also disliked how the fender gap was uneven front and rear making it look like there was extra weight in the trunk.

Earlier this year I decided that it was time to give up on the T sportline springs and go for a real coilovers setup. After reading a few of the reviews here, and overall being impressed with the work Mountainpass is doing, I decided on the comfort coilovers. While I’m sure the sport set is great, I don’t plan to track this car so the extra cost for adjustable compression/rebound didn’t seem necessary.


So, here are my thoughts and impressions of the MP comfort coilovers so far:

Ride quality
Definitely better than either stock or the T sportline springs. I find that the medium-speed compressions bumps are the smoothest, e.g. speed bumps. Slow compressions are good, as expected, and fast compressions (divots, cracks, reflectors) are stiff but significantly better than the T sportline springs.

Handling
Despite being more compliant, I have found the handling to be better overall. When taking a sharp turn under power, the T sportlines were nice and flat due to the progressive rear springs, but most other movements or hard turns were mediocre at best. At worst, a mid-turn bump would upset the handling and was quite unnerving. The MPP comforts might have slightly more body roll in fast power turns, but overall the handling is way more predictable, responsive, and generally easier to maneuver at speed.

Ride height
The ability to dial in ride height is the killer feature here. The specs recommended by MPP were a bit too low for my taste but they looked real slick :) I ended up taking the car back to HP to have them raised up a bit. After a few weeks of settling my final ride height is around 1.5” below stock and ground clearance is still a bit on the low side for my needs. There are lots of steep driveways here in SB and my wife gets quite uneasy when we bottom out. Ideally I'd like to bring the ride height up a second time but still debating whether it's worth the cost for another adjustment.

Ground-to-fender height:
26 7/8” front and rear

Battery pack ground clearance:
4” front
3 7/8” rear

(For comparison, here are the measurements I took on the stock suspension and also on the T Sportline springs.)

Summary
Overall I am very happy with the MPP comfort coilovers. As MPP claims, I would characterize them as the ideal street sportscar suspension, which strikes the right balance between handling and comfort for a daily-driven sports car. If I had to nit-pick, I would like to see slightly softer response on fast-compression bumps and divots, and slightly stiffer overall handling, but it really is 95% perfect so I’m talking about minor improvements here. Also, Harold mentioned the MPP kit was significantly lighter than the stock part so you save a good amount of unsprung weight with this kit.

I should probably note that I am on stock 19” sport wheels and factory continental tires. I also installed spacers of 15mm front and 20mm rear back in August when i had the T sportlines installed. I’m not 100% sure how spacers change the physics of suspensions but that could be be affecting my experience somewhat. @MountainPass I would love any insights you can share on this point.

I have attached some photos of the final setup. Overall I’m very happy with the setup and enjoying my Model 3 even more than before. Kudos to MPP for a great suspension and HP Autosport for a great install.

View attachment 399183 View attachment 399184 View attachment 399189 View attachment 399186 View attachment 399191 View attachment 399188

Another post of RWD getting more body roll on the Comfort Coilovers. I have AWD and was wondering would this be no different for me as well?
 

M3RideHeight

Member
Sep 29, 2019
25
13
SF Bay Area
Another post of RWD getting more body roll on the Comfort Coilovers. I have AWD and was wondering would this be no different for me as well?
I do not have comfort coilovers but to be on the safe side, I would recommend sport version coilovers. It should also give you comfort ride depending on settings and definitely reduced body roll from stock suspension.
 
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