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NEMA 14-50 Splitter for dryer + Tesla

New owner here.

I have a NEMA 14-50 in my washer room. It makes the most economic sense for me to use that outlet and run an extension cord to my car rather than install the wall charger. But I'd rather not have to plug and unplug the outlet between the charging cord and the dryer.

What is the economically sensible and yet safe option to plug both in at the same time? I see dryer buddies but they are NEMA 14-30. I'd like something that would turn off the EV charging when the dryer runs but where both are steadily plugged in.

Thanks!
 

Sophias_dad

Active Member
Supporting Member
Jul 29, 2018
2,228
2,549
Massachusetts
New owner here.

I have a NEMA 14-50 in my washer room. It makes the most economic sense for me to use that outlet and run an extension cord to my car rather than install the wall charger. But I'd rather not have to plug and unplug the outlet between the charging cord and the dryer.

What is the economically sensible and yet safe option to plug both in at the same time? I see dryer buddies but they are NEMA 14-30. I'd like something that would turn off the EV charging when the dryer runs but where both are steadily plugged in.

Thanks!
Are you absolutely sure its a 14-50? It would be quite strange.
 
New owner here.

I have a NEMA 14-50 in my washer room. It makes the most economic sense for me to use that outlet and run an extension cord to my car rather than install the wall charger. But I'd rather not have to plug and unplug the outlet between the charging cord and the dryer.

What is the economically sensible and yet safe option to plug both in at the same time? I see dryer buddies but they are NEMA 14-30. I'd like something that would turn off the EV charging when the dryer runs but where both are steadily plugged in.

Thanks!
I think your best solution is to obtain a few quotes from Tesla recommended electricians in your area that are familiar with local codes. You don't mention what your electrical capacity is but a qualified electrician will tell you.
You don't want to risk an electrical fire for an improper and code violation installation.
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
7,977
10,102
Boise, ID
I have a NEMA 14-50 in my washer room.
I doubt that. It is probably a 14-30.
I see dryer buddies but they are NEMA 14-30.
Yes, because that is what clothes dryers use.

This may help. It has pictures of most of the common outlets so you could identify what you have.

If you are going to use a Dryer Buddy, I would only recommend getting the "Plus AUTO" version. That has automatic detection and switching so that if you do turn on the dryer, it will make sure to lock out the car side so they don't accidentally both try drawing at the same time.
 
So.....the issue was the dryer room had 120v

So when I had the electriican come in, I asked them to install a Nema 14-50 and they did....and sold me an adapter to the dryer to fit the Nema 14-50

Hope that explains the weird set up in the dryer room.

(Note, not feeling to happy with the electrician right now)
 

Sophias_dad

Active Member
Supporting Member
Jul 29, 2018
2,228
2,549
Massachusetts
So.....the issue was the dryer room had 120v

So when I had the electriican come in, I asked them to install a Nema 14-50 and they did....and sold me an adapter to the dryer to fit the Nema 14-50

Hope that explains the weird set up in the dryer room.

(Note, not feeling to happy with the electrician right now)
Might I ask a dumb question? Why not just plug the dryer, which is undoubtedly gas powered and takes almost no power, into the same outlet as the washer?

Assuming there was a dedicated circuit to the dryer, you could turn it into a 6-15 or maybe 6-20, and save ALL the hassle of the dryerbuddy or whatever. In fact, the dryerbuddy was always entirely unnecessary because its a gas dryer and takes almost no power.

Thinking further, if the electrician put in a 14-50 AND it was properly wired and breakered, just plug your UMC into it and go!
 
Last edited:

Big Dog

Active Member
Mar 7, 2016
1,842
2,036
Irvine, CA
So.....the issue was the dryer room had 120v

So when I had the electriican come in, I asked them to install a Nema 14-50 and they did....and sold me an adapter to the dryer to fit the Nema 14-50

Hope that explains the weird set up in the dryer room.

(Note, not feeling to happy with the electrician right now)

So you are saying the electrician installed a 14-50 receptacle on a 15/20 amp line? I can't believe that such a setup meets electrical code.
 
So.....the issue was the dryer room had 120v

So when I had the electriican come in, I asked them to install a Nema 14-50 and they did....and sold me an adapter to the dryer to fit the Nema 14-50

Hope that explains the weird set up in the dryer room.

(Note, not feeling to happy with the electrician right now)
I have a gas clothes dryer and it is plugged into a 115 volt outlet
Only electric dryers use a 240v outlet
 
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extension cords are not recommended for EV charging. And I believe code for electric dryers is generally a 30* amp circuit, so a 14-50 won't work.

*Check your local city/town regs.
I have Tesla Wall Charger on one side of a 3 car garage and I ran an extension cord to the middle to charge . This is done since 2014 with no issue. Now I have another Tesla. Although I will never charge both cars at the same time, I wonder is a splitter cable which is rated for 30 A sufficient so that I can plug one charging cable into each. I will take turn charging the two cars. Has anyone done that?
 
I have Tesla Wall Charger on one side of a 3 car garage and I ran an extension cord to the middle to charge . This is done since 2014 with no issue. Now I have another Tesla. Although I will never charge both cars at the same time, I wonder is a splitter cable which is rated for 30 A sufficient so that I can plug one charging cable into each. I will take turn charging the two cars. Has anyone done that?
If I had a three car garage and two Tesla vehicles, I would have two Tesla Wall chargers.
Why not just do is safely and correctly and meet current NEC codes for electric vehicles?
I think what most have to remember is most insurance companies will look for any excuse to not pay a claim in case of an electrical fire that is traced to a non code installation by a non licensed electrician.
 

Big Dog

Active Member
Mar 7, 2016
1,842
2,036
Irvine, CA
I have Tesla Wall Charger on one side of a 3 car garage and I ran an extension cord to the middle to charge . This is done since 2014 with no issue. Now I have another Tesla. Although I will never charge both cars at the same time, I wonder is a splitter cable which is rated for 30 A sufficient so that I can plug one charging cable into each. I will take turn charging the two cars. Has anyone done that?
Just bcos you haven't had an issue (yet), doesn't mean its safe. Plus what's the point of a WC and extension cord as the latter carries a whole lot less juice than what teh WC can put out?
 
Just bcos you haven't had an issue (yet), doesn't mean its safe. Plus what's the point of a WC and extension cord as the latter carries a whole lot less juice than what teh WC can put out?
Why do you assume this? I'm sure he's not using some cheap 15 or 20 amp extension cord. They make extension cords that are heavier than the Tesla charger cord, I believe.
 
Why do you assume this? I'm sure he's not using some cheap 15 or 20 amp extension cord. They make extension cords that are heavier than the Tesla charger cord, I believe.
You are so correct Mary3SR+. Mine extension cord is rated for 50 Amp when I am only charging at 32A max. No issue. The cable is not even warm, never mine fire hazard. The cord size is easily double that of the Tesla OEM cord.
 
The problem with extension cords is they’re not all the same. If you have wiring installed to code you know what you’ve got, but not so with an extension cord. The other issue is every cord means an additional set of contacts which end up being a prime source of failure.

It’s possible to safely use an extension cord, but you can automatically say an extension cord is safe.
 
The problem with extension cords is they’re not all the same. If you have wiring installed to code you know what you’ve got, but not so with an extension cord. The other issue is every cord means an additional set of contacts which end up being a prime source of failure.

It’s possible to safely use an extension cord, but you can automatically say an extension cord is safe.
Well, I wish that were true, but I've been around the block a few times, and I've seen some pretty sloppy work done by electricians to code. A friend of mine hired an electrician to put in a new panel, and many connections were loose; he had to go and tighten all of them. Fortunately, both of us knew electricity well, although we are not electricians.

Also, codes have changed, and there are many, many houses installed to code that would not pass now. My house in particular, built in the 1950s is a mess. No ground wires at all, wires taped with ancient electrical tape instead of wire nuts, etc. A modern, well-made extension cord made with machines is consistent, and unless there's a defect, will work fine. If there is a defect, it's usually detectable right away; it either doesn't work, or it overheats.

The main problem with extension cords is they are not hidden, so can be mistreated and damaged. For the average user, that may be a problem, but for us more knowledgeable users, we don't do that.
 
You are so correct Mary3SR+. Mine extension cord is rated for 50 Amp when I am only charging at 32A max. No issue. The cable is not even warm, never mine fire hazard. The cord size is easily double that of the Tesla OEM cord.
The main problem with extension cords is they can be mistreated and damaged. As long as you are careful, and keep it away from moving objects, it will probably work forever (unless you constantly connect/disconnect, causing contacts to get loose).
 
I've seen some pretty sloppy work done by electricians to code. A friend of mine hired an electrician to put in a new panel, and many connections were loose
code species all work to be done in a "neat and workmanlike manner" as well as installing equipment per manufacturer specifications. From what you describe, the work wasn't done to code.
 

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