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Tuxs

Member
Nov 5, 2019
79
8
UK
Took the plunge and ordered a M3 Long Range. 2 year lease via Zen Auto.

Have been told 3 month lead time (Mid Feb 2020) so have informed them to hold back until March delivery for new reg plate.

Next job is to install a home charger. Any advise/tips as to what one to go for and what company to go through as this is all new to me.

Thanks
 

VanillaAir_UK

Well-Known Member
Jun 17, 2019
8,484
6,024
Surrey, UK
Don't get one too early if you want OLEV grant. The grant has a limited validity before getting the car. (3 months?) although I believe can be extended in certain circumstances.
 

Ramb0

Member
Oct 21, 2019
36
8
Londom
If you’re leasing, what does it matter what the reg plate is?

I just had a pod point installed today, all went smoothly, pick attached if interested..

IMG-20191113-WA0012.jpeg
 
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anon37485

Closed
Jul 18, 2019
260
131
Earth
I wouldn't ask them to 'hold back', any delay isn't worth it. You can always stall at the end, don't tell them now.

As mentioned above, waiting for a new plate is pointless, especially for a lease. There's zero advantage, if anything it shows you've had the car longer/earlier than others (if you're bothered about bragging rights?).
 

Jason71

Active Member
May 8, 2019
3,076
3,084
Shropshire
I suggest downloading the list of olev installers:
Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme authorised installers
and finding some small ones in your area and getting some quotes for whatever types they fit.
I found that the way to get the best price and shortest install delay (about 3 weeks for me for a tethered Rolec)
so there probably isn't any rush if you are looking beyond Feb unless you want an Anderson then its 3 months.
 
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Tuxs

Member
Nov 5, 2019
79
8
UK
Thanks for the help!

Regarding the home chargers are they all much of a muchness or are certain ones generally better than others for speed/reliability/looks etc?
 

MelT3

Member
Oct 27, 2019
89
36
Leics
Took the plunge and ordered a M3 Long Range. 2 year lease via Zen Auto.

Have been told 3 month lead time (Mid Feb 2020) so have informed them to hold back until March delivery for new reg plate.

Next job is to install a home charger. Any advise/tips as to what one to go for and what company to go through as this is all new to me.

Thanks
I agree, waiting is pointless. You will be frustrated enough without waiting for March - it’s been agony! I also went with Pod-Point. Lead time until installed was nearly 4 weeks, but no problems and it looks good too. Finally get my car in about 3 weeks! :)
 

Tuxs

Member
Nov 5, 2019
79
8
UK
Ok and just so I know what’s the difference between installing a Tesla home charger to a standard one? From what I understand you don’t get the grant if you go for the Tesla one? However does it charge quicker or have any other advantages?
 

Jason71

Active Member
May 8, 2019
3,076
3,084
Shropshire
Ok and just so I know what’s the difference between installing a Tesla home charger to a standard one? From what I understand you don’t get the grant if you go for the Tesla one? However does it charge quicker or have any other advantages?
It does not charge faster. It is not eligible for the grant because it is not smart enough.
the only advantage it has apart from looking quite nice and saying TESLA on the front is the button on the charge "nozzle" that opens the charge port as you approach the car which saves you 5 seconds as opposed to pressing the charge flap ( both methods of opening require the car to be unlocked or have an authenticated device near by ).
If you really want to pay over the odds for a nice looking charger check out Anderson.
 
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VanillaAir_UK

Well-Known Member
Jun 17, 2019
8,484
6,024
Surrey, UK
the only advantage it has apart from looking quite nice and saying TESLA on the front is the button on the charge "nozzle" that opens the charge port as you approach the car which saves you 5 seconds as opposed to pressing the charge flap ( both methods of opening require the car to be unlocked or have an authenticated device near by ).

Actually the real advantage is stopping the charge at the end and disconnecting without having to do anything else - just walk up to car, press button, remove 'nozzle', job done - so long as you have your phone on you. Exactly the same as supercharging.
 

Glan gluaisne

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Sep 11, 2019
2,782
2,912
UK
Ok and just so I know what’s the difference between installing a Tesla home charger to a standard one? From what I understand you don’t get the grant if you go for the Tesla one? However does it charge quicker or have any other advantages?

All charge points rated for the same current will charge at the same rate. The main differences between a cheaper charge point (something like the ~£250 QUBEV one, for example) and a more expensive one, will be the range of features it offers in terms of control and whether it is eligible for the OLEV grant. The latter needs a charge point to comply with the OLEV definition of being "smart", and can then attract a subsidy of 75% of the total installed cost, up to a maximum of £500.

I suspect that some installers are inflating the price of installations so that they can collect the full £500 subsidy, as there's no good reason for some of the prices being as high as they are.

If you choose not to opt for a subsidised installation, then that's fine; none of my charge points were subsidised, and the most expensive one cost me around £200 in total, including the charge point and all the installation materials (they were all DIY installs).

Any electrician (has to be a member of a Part P cartel in England and Wales, but not in Scotland) can install a non-subsidised charge point. The cost depends mainly on the length of the cable run from the incoming supply, plus the ease with which a cable can be run, but in general it shouldn't take longer than about half a day, so around £100 to £150 labour (here electricians charge around £200 - £220/day).

The Tesla charge point has the advantage of including a button to open the charge port on the car, which is also able to terminate a charge and unlock the connector so it can be released. This can be a useful function - other EVs don't offer such functionality, and it can be a nuisance to try and stop a charge so that the connector can be unlocked (a particular issue with the BMW i3, I've found).

Non-Tesla charge points can offer a range of capabilities, from being pretty dumb, like the cheap QUBEV, which only allows selection of charge current and a manual switch to turn the thing on and off, through to smart units that allow charge times etc to be set using an app, will integrate with microgeneration systems to try and optimise self-generated electricity use when charging, etc. It depends very much what you need, or, perhaps, want.

I built in the option to select E7 off-peak only charging to mine, as well as variable charge rate and the ability to only charge the car when we're generating enough spare electricity from our solar panels. I wasn't interested in a web interface or being able to control the thing from an app, so just have to rotary selectors to choose the mode, plus a display that shows the charge current. power, voltage, energy used etc. In practice all I use most of the time is the light on the front to tell when the car is charging/preconditioning.
 
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anon37485

Closed
Jul 18, 2019
260
131
Earth
... the only advantage it has apart from looking quite nice and saying TESLA on the front is the button on the charge "nozzle" that opens the charge port as you approach the car ...

I agree with this 100%. If it was OLEV eligible (ie smart), I'd have gone for it for these reasons alone.
 

JupiterMan

Member
Aug 7, 2019
537
577
Hertfordshire, UK
The main differences between a cheaper charge point (something like the ~£250 QUBEV one, for example) and a more expensive one, will be the range of features it offers in terms of control and whether it is eligible for the OLEV grant.

For me there is also the question of aesthetics.

My wife would not allow wires hung on our wall looking untidy, so it looks like we will be going for the Anderson A2 charging unit shortly, £895 with OLEV, so not cheap, but looks nice.

Andersen A2 | Stylish and Smart Enabled Electric Car Charging Points

don't want to hijack thread - but anyone have experience with this one?
 

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