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Space Adventures private Dragon flight : NET Late 2021

Grendal

SpaceX Moderator
Jan 31, 2012
5,800
7,108
Santa Fe, New Mexico
A Falcon 9 launch is about $60M and I expect the Dragon cost is about the same, so $120M or $30M / seat. Obviously not below $15M / seat.

I'm expecting $15 million each. Keep in mind that this will likely be using a previously flown booster and a reused Dragon 2. So the launch cost is probably more like $40 million or less.
 
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adiggs

Active Member
Sep 25, 2012
4,252
11,737
Portland, OR
I'm finding it hard to believe those of you that are poo-pooing the accommodations.

My claim - if seriously the only thing between you and a 3-5 day visit to space was the bathroom accommodations, my bet is that you'd suck it up and you'd be there. You might might poo-poo the accommodations in public, but in private - you're there.

I know that if the one thing holding me back was how I'd use the bathroom while I was there, then I really don't care what the details are - I'm going to space and becoming one of the very small number of human beings to see the Earth from space.


In fairness, I'd rather be on the second or later one of these rides :). Just in case there are any bugs in the space adventure - let somebody else work them out and I'd go along for a later edition. The big deal for me is where I come up with a spare $10-30M (my guess at what a ticket will cost), when I'm still trying to figure out where the $2-5M I need to retire and stop working is going to come from. And yes - the retirement money is a bigger priority for me than going to space (probably because one sounds likely, and one sounds fantastic and unlikely).
 
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Nikxice

Active Member
Oct 31, 2014
1,081
1,832
Hudson, NH
I too wouldn't sweat the sparse Crew Dragon accommodations for a few days. Forget poohing, NASA no longer discusses the fact that at least one in three astronauts gets Space sickness within their first day. And there's no way to predict who's going to be vulnerable. It can be messy, often occurring with little forewarning. On a Starship flight I'll bet the shear volume of habitable space on the inside would only exacerbate that issue. Another thought about with Crew Dragon. There's that happy ending issue of bobbin' in the ocean for a couple hours after splashdown. Best practice: Don't eat your lunch before reentry!
 
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Cosmacelf

Well-Known Member
Mar 6, 2013
8,485
20,372
San Diego
Look, space tourism is fine and all, but there's a reason why astronauts are tested for physical stamina. Huge G forces when lifting off, huge bone rattling vibration. Then stomach churning endless free fall. The bathroom thing. The food thing. And coming back down is then even worse as far as shock and vibration and you've got a frigging inferno a few feet away from you. Then nice gentle wavy rocking up and down, up and down on the ocean.

I mean, it's cool and all, but it will be a trial.

Blue Origin and Virgin Galactic are going to much more accessible to the average person, not to mention a lot cheaper.
 

ecarfan

Well-Known Member
Sep 21, 2013
19,198
13,851
West Vancouver, British Columbia
space tourism is fine and all, but there's a reason why astronauts are tested for physical stamina. Huge G forces when lifting off, huge bone rattling vibration. Then stomach churning endless free fall. The bathroom thing. The food thing. And coming back down is then even worse as far as shock and vibration and you've got a frigging inferno a few feet away from you. Then nice gentle wavy rocking up and down, up and down on the ocean.
As @Nikxice correctly notes, astronauts often experience space sickness that lasts for hours or even days. It’s actually quite common. The G force during launch and ascent is less than 3G, averaging 2 or less. That’s not a problem. Re-entry is a very bumpy ride but it does not cause physical damage to the body. Of course the Crew Dragon capsule seats would be custom made to fit each person; that’s part of the ticket cost. (I recommend reading Scott Kelly’s book Endeavour to learn more about what liftoff and re-entry is like, as well as many other fascinating things about going to orbit)

I suspect that SpaceX will figure out how to create a very small private bathroom cubicle. Doesn’t seem like there would be enough room for private sleeping cubicles.

Blue Origin and Virgin Galactic are going to much more accessible to the average person, not to mention a lot cheaper.
They will be more accessible simply because they will be so much less expensive. But the time spent in microgravity will be just a few minutes, and ones view of the Earth will be limited compared to what the Space Adventures trip will offer.

After reading more news reports on this topic it appears that there will not be a SpaceX crew member on board, just the four tourists. Of course the tourists will have to go through a training program. But apparently the capsule will be controlled from the ground.
 

e-FTW

New electron smell
Aug 23, 2015
3,279
3,096
San Francisco, CA
just the four tourists
5 days in a small capsule with strangers. What could go wrong... My mind wanders to the Stanford Experiment.
Astronauts are evaluated on a number of psychological factors that minimize the chances of issues with close-quarters living with folks you don’t know that well. And they spend years training and living together before a mission.
Am not saying I would turn down a cheap ticket!
 

bxr140

Active Member
Nov 18, 2014
2,749
3,858
Bay Area
I was also curious as to what height a human can view the earth as a whole disc. The best resource I found was from a NASA photogrammetrist (yup that's a job). Someone who expertly extracts information from photographs. Answer, 12,000 miles.

While “disk” is a bit of a nebulous trigonometric concept, it is no coincidence that GNSS constellations fly at ~12,000 miles.

For a visual, at that altitude the earth disk is around 30 degrees wide. For reference, at GEO the earth disk is 17 degrees and at 500km LEO it’s 85 degrees. (Both the sun and the moon are about 1/2 degree)
 

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