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Various internal and external care discussion

PeterK

Model X, 3 & Y Owner
Supporting Member
Jan 17, 2013
1,721
668
Cambridge, MA
Moderator Note: Off topic discussion moved from another thread.
Back on topic, my detailer did discover the need for more work before clear bra can be applied for his and the customer's maximum satisfaction. I will look forward to the results from others as wax and polish hides a lot of surface specks that exist on the clear coat that did cause a lack of perfect smoothness to the plastic wrap. I was there to see the situation and give the go ahead to spend more for the best results. While the finest grit sanding and compounding of the top of the clear coat is required for my early VIN, improvements at the clear coat application location could eliminate this extra step for those detailers who remove all the wax down to the clear coat. The happy news is that it is correctable for the ultra expert detailer who specializes in Tesla cars and judges the original quality of the protective surfaces based on working with new cars arriving on a weekly basis.

Relax, this is not an issue for 99% of buyers, only those who take their vehicles to the companies who specialize in perfection. Enjoy your Model X Signature!

Mark, thanks for the update. How much of the car are you wrapping, and are you looking at shiny or matte protection on the seat backs?
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Mark, thanks for the update. How much of the car are you wrapping, and are you looking at shiny or matte protection on the seat backs?
The Model S wrap by Tesla Motors was a starting point. A half wrap of the hood hasn't worked well, as damage occurred above the wrap during the 55,000+ miles. The rear corners of the rear bumper was also skipped by Tesla, and it didn't take much of a scrape for the paint to be scraped off. Wrap protects paint surfaces and should be applied where you think damage will occur.

Since I normally park in protective places, my side doors have survived without wrap. I don't plan to wrap the Falcon Wing Doors but I may change my mind later. Here is the list:

Front Bumper
Headlights (not critical since lenses can be replaced - it is not on my Model S.*)
Full Hood
Fenders (not on S, but I will on these front fenders.)
A-Pillar both sides (not on S, but a rock did cause damage.)
Mirrors
Rear Bumper (full wrap, not partial like the S.)
Rear Spoiler
Rear Hatch trailing edge
Aluminum insert drop metal piece on the hatch sill. (The metal to plastic rubbing is causing shiny spots on the upper hatch latch.)

My Model S has a carbon fiber spoiler and withstands the hatch lifts into concrete beams on occasion with no damage at all. Model X leaves the spoiler in the UP position during hatch raise unless the car is locked. IMHO, both need protection at the present time unless you only park where the ceiling is high. Maybe software changes will lower the spoiler eventually, but IMHO the time it would take to lower may be the reason for leaving it raised. While I am careful, it is when you are in unique parking locations that a problem can occur of forgetting to monitor the hatch opening. There does not appear to be a sensor. The spoiler will take the hit or when down the edge of the hatch. For now, adding wrap to both makes sense. There will be no wrap on the reflector/light of the spoiler. (Another option would be to set a low opening point before a vacation, then lift the hatch manually each time. IMHO, GPS would help if each favorite location could be at selected positions and the default could be low. Or, Tesla could add a sensor.)

NO wrap is planned for my shiny seat backs since I have few riders. (More in the opinion section below.) Use the shiny or matte product you prefer if you do protect them. It is too soon for such decisions for me, as corrective work is still required on the interior by Tesla Motors.

Inside we are doing sill tests. One FWD door sill and a driver door X sill plate will be covered with matte film to see how it looks. This should be an entire separate topic in regard to protecting the Signature interior. What was shown by Tesla in September is in our Model X Signature vehicles.

OPINION: The Model X rear interior was designed for artistic enjoyment like an iPhone that you either use carefully, protect with a case, or just use and trade in a few years to get the latest design. Normal use could mar the shiny surfaces, but they are polishable. In the opinion of others who have seen my Model X, Tesla needs a ruggedized version. (Tip: Do ask about return condition if you are leasing.) I am glad to be holding onto Model S at the present time as Model X will be enjoyed for travel, personal use and occasional Ludicrous rides with careful riders who watch their step through the FWDs. (I wouldn't want to be an Uber driver with my frustration of each added scuff!) My detailer can add some protection at the metal FWD sills, but in his opinion they may get dented if the outside metal edge is always used as the step edge, even with protection (i.e.: a person has a rock in their shoe), mine was dented before delivery!


*The Model X headlight beam is not a smooth light like Model S, but rather has some bright/dim patterns on the road surface. Maybe my wrap will help a bit with that? I'll soon know.
 

PeterK

Model X, 3 & Y Owner
Supporting Member
Jan 17, 2013
1,721
668
Cambridge, MA
Thanks, Mark. Fortunately I'm not leasing, and my kids are getting older (five of them, ages 20 down to 7, mostly girls), but I still expect those shiny seat backs to take a hit if not wrapped.

Mods (efusco?), this could start a whole thread on wrapping Model S, or it could move back to where it was, but doesn't belong here in the Norway discussion.

The Model S wrap by Tesla Motors was a starting point. A half wrap of the hood hasn't worked well, as damage occurred above the wrap during the 55,000+ miles. The rear corners of the rear bumper was also skipped by Tesla, and it didn't take much of a scrape for the paint to be scraped off. Wrap protects paint surfaces and should be applied where you think damage will occur.

Since I normally park in protective places, my side doors have survived without wrap. I don't plan to wrap the Falcon Wing Doors but I may change my mind later. Here is the list:

Front Bumper
Headlights (not critical since lenses can be replaced - it is not on my Model S.*)
Full Hood
Fenders (not on S, but I will on these front fenders.)
A-Pillar both sides (not on S, but a rock did cause damage.)
Mirrors
Rear Bumper (full wrap, not partial like the S.)
Rear Spoiler
Rear Hatch trailing edge
Aluminum insert drop metal piece on the hatch sill. (The metal to plastic rubbing is causing shiny spots on the upper hatch latch.)

My Model S has a carbon fiber spoiler and withstands the hatch lifts into concrete beams on occasion with no damage at all. Model X leaves the spoiler in the UP position during hatch raise unless the car is locked. IMHO, both need protection at the present time unless you only park where the ceiling is high. Maybe software changes will lower the spoiler eventually, but IMHO the time it would take to lower may be the reason for leaving it raised. While I am careful, it is when you are in unique parking locations that a problem can occur of forgetting to monitor the hatch opening. There does not appear to be a sensor. The spoiler will take the hit or when down the edge of the hatch. For now, adding wrap to both makes sense. There will be no wrap on the reflector/light of the spoiler. (Another option would be to set a low opening point before a vacation, then lift the hatch manually each time. IMHO, GPS would help if each favorite location could be at selected positions and the default could be low. Or, Tesla could add a sensor.)

NO wrap is planned for my shiny seat backs since I have few riders. (More in the opinion section below.) Use the shiny or matte product you prefer if you do protect them. It is too soon for such decisions for me, as corrective work is still required on the interior by Tesla Motors.

Inside we are doing sill tests. One FWD door sill and a driver door X sill plate will be covered with matte film to see how it looks. This should be an entire separate topic in regard to protecting the Signature interior. What was shown by Tesla in September is in our Model X Signature vehicles.

OPINION: The Model X rear interior was designed for artistic enjoyment like an iPhone that you either use carefully, protect with a case, or just use and trade in a few years to get the latest design. Normal use could mar the shiny surfaces, but they are polishable. In the opinion of others who have seen my Model X, Tesla needs a ruggedized version. (Tip: Do ask about return condition if you are leasing.) I am glad to be holding onto Model S at the present time as Model X will be enjoyed for travel, personal use and occasional Ludicrous rides with careful riders who watch their step through the FWDs. (I wouldn't want to be an Uber driver with my frustration of each added scuff!) My detailer can add some protection at the metal FWD sills, but in his opinion they may get dented if the outside metal edge is always used as the step edge, even with protection (i.e.: a person has a rock in their shoe), mine was dented before delivery!


*The Model X headlight beam is not a smooth light like Model S, but rather has some bright/dim patterns on the road surface. Maybe my wrap will help a bit with that? I'll soon know.
 

PeterK

Model X, 3 & Y Owner
Supporting Member
Jan 17, 2013
1,721
668
Cambridge, MA
Thanks, Mark. Fortunately I'm not leasing, and my kids are getting older (five of them, ages 20 down to 7, mostly girls), but I still expect those shiny seat backs to take a hit if not wrapped.

Mods (efusco?), this could start a whole thread on wrapping Model S, or it could move back to where it was, but doesn't belong here in the Norway discussion.

Actually I mistyped - this is about Model X wrapping and care...
 
Actually I mistyped - this is about Model X wrapping and care...
I see the thread has been moved. Great idea. Let me post some photos of what was determined. Details later after it's ALL finished. Moe plans on posting detail too.

Paint flaws required more correction than normal for the clear bra material to be applied. Ouch! That is sanding with about 2500 or 3000 grit (could be higher, so don't quote me). Compounding being done at the last photo. This were done after cleaning and claying the surface. A solution was used to strip all wax and return the car to the original clear coat layer. http://glisteningperfection.com specializes in Tesla and Porsche. Their work is flawless and will allow the clear bra material to look as good as the waxed and polished paint.

I was pleased to be present during this stage, as I could see how bad the clear coat surface specks were. The clear bra didn’t look right without this extra step. Moe knows what he is doing and all the Tesla owners trust him fully as the results are amazing.

IMG_1261.JPG


IMG_1262.JPG
 
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