Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

Australian standards for home charging an Electric Vehicle.

This site may earn commission on affiliate links.
Surely the prudent person, when not knowing which CB to turn off, would turn them all off?
I received a late night call from a young relative recently asking what the row of switches was in their apartment. After a pic was exchanged I advised it was their circuit breakers. I then had to explain what the purpose of them was. I also advised that they had no earth leakage protection and recommended thay get some plugs that offer such for their 3 pin wet appliances.
 
  • Funny
Reactions: sishome
It’s worth mentioning that the Tesla UMC has a temperature probe in the 3-pin plug, which will ramp down and/or disconnect to prevent a GPO fire due to a poor connection in the GPO. This is a lot safer than the kettle/air-fryer/microwave/sandwich press on our kitchen bench that my partner might choose to operate simultaneously! Just sayin…

Edit: I’m not entirely sure whether the 32A aftermarket pigtail I purchased has the same, although I don’t use that at home - just a backup for road trips that’s never been used thus far.
 
  • Like
Reactions: paulp
Came across this Norwegian Website whilst looking for Australian standards for home charging an Electric Vehicle. Alt du trenger å vite om hjemmelading which if I understand the translation correctly is the Norwegian Automobile Association.

Given we share similarities with Norway's electrical system and they are further down the road in implementing EV's into their national road fleet, should we implement similar regulations

---------------------------------------------------------
Can I charge with a socket?
From 1 July 2022, you must install a charging box when you create a new charging point at home. The grounded socket for use for regular charging of electric cars has been removed in the new installation standard NEK 400:2022, which applies to low-voltage electrical installations.
This means that you must install a charging box with a type 2 connector if you need a new charging point for electric car charging.
The standard applies to new installations and does not have retroactive effect. It thus does not affect established charging points before 1 July 2022. The change also does not mean that emergency charging using an existing earthed household socket is prohibited.


From <Alt du trenger å vite om hjemmelading>


Charge with a standard socket
From July 2022, there is a requirement for a charging box with a type 2 connector for new installations for permanent electric vehicle charging - the standard does not have retroactive effect and so-called emergency charging is still permitted.

The fact that the standard does not have retroactive effect means that if you have arranged for permanent charging using a socket before July 2022, you can still use this installation for permanent charging. These are the rules that apply to installations made before 1 July 2022:

  • You must have your own course for the electric car
  • Max 10 A course
  • The course must have an earth fault circuit breaker type B
  • You must always pull the cable out of the car before removing the plug from the socket when you have finished charging
Install a basket or a hook that can be used to hang the charging box and cable when charging, both to relieve the weight of the charging cable (the connector cannot withstand the weight) and to avoid wear and tear on the charging equipment.
The guidelines for charging only apply where you charge on a daily basis. You can therefore "emergency charge" at your mother-in-law's or at a friend's, even if dedicated electric car charging is not planned. However, it is important to keep an eye on the contact during charging, as overheating may occur.
It is the Directorate for Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness that enforces the regulations for electrical installations.

New standards for installation of charging points
The change in NEK 400:2022, which comes into effect on 1 July 2022, applies to low-voltage electrical installations. It consists in the fact that it is no longer possible to install an earthed household socket for use for daily or regular charging of electric cars.
This means that if charging is the purpose of the installation, you must install a charging box with a Type 2 connector.

The Electric Vehicle Association recommends that you install a home charger where you charge on a daily basis. This is a much safer and faster way to charge your electric car. You can read more about charging at home here!

From <Lade med vanlig stikkontakt>View attachment 1019216
US Standards are pretty liberal I think due to a robust electric grid (Except Texas) I had a regular electrician put a NEMA 15-50 outlet close to my breaker box in the garage and it cost me about 300 bucks including the materials. I connect the mobile charger to the outlet and charge my MYLR which draws a maximum of 32A. I did have the electrician put a 60A breaker just in case I upgrade the charger to Tesla home charger which can go up to 48A which would be ideal for home but it has to be hard wired which I can actually do myself! But so far there has not been a need for the extra 500 bucks to spend as the mobile charger does the job great!
 
It’s worth mentioning that the Tesla UMC has a temperature probe in the 3-pin plug, which will ramp down and/or disconnect to prevent a GPO fire due to a poor connection in the GPO. This is a lot safer than the kettle/air-fryer/microwave/sandwich press on our kitchen bench that my partner might choose to operate simultaneously! Just sayin…

Edit: I’m not entirely sure whether the 32A aftermarket pigtail I purchased has the same, although I don’t use that at home - just a backup for road trips that’s never been used thus far.
From the point of view of the discussion above it does not matter. What matters is if the fire can even theoretically be caused by connecting EV charger to the mains in any reasonable or unreasonable, legal or illegal way, it should be banned. Any sort of protection is irrelevant.
What is interesting, a similar kind of reasoning has led to enforcing Type B RCBO for Mode 3 charging: theoretically and very, very hypothetically, hardwired chargers can cause a situation, when a leak current has a very specific profile, which cannot be detected by Type A RCBO. Therefore, we enforce Type B because those EV owners are rich anyway.
 
US Standards are pretty liberal I think due to a robust electric grid (Except Texas) I had a regular electrician put a NEMA 15-50 outlet close to my breaker box in the garage and it cost me about 300 bucks including the materials. I connect the mobile charger to the outlet and charge my MYLR which draws a maximum of 32A. I did have the electrician put a 60A breaker just in case I upgrade the charger to Tesla home charger which can go up to 48A which would be ideal for home but it has to be hard wired which I can actually do myself! But so far there has not been a need for the extra 500 bucks to spend as the mobile charger does the job great!
According to the Australian beliefs, you in Murica are all dead from electric shock, no exceptions.
 
  • Like
Reactions: arvindm
From the point of view of the discussion above it does not matter. What matters is if the fire can even theoretically be caused by connecting EV charger to the mains in any reasonable or unreasonable, legal or illegal way, it should be banned. Any sort of protection is irrelevant.
What is interesting, a similar kind of reasoning has led to enforcing Type B RCBO for Mode 3 charging: theoretically and very, very hypothetically, hardwired chargers can cause a situation, when a leak current has a very specific profile, which cannot be detected by Type A RCBO. Therefore, we enforce Type B because those EV owners are rich anyway.
When you go down the rabbit hole of Type B - I have to ask, are we still talking about fire, or other stuff? This discussion really is about whether constant 15A (or even 10A) EV charging should be allowed through a GPO, and the risk of fire (not electrocution).

EDIT: I understand the Gen 3 wall connector has type B built in. I actually have 2 of those sitting in a box in the garage. I didn’t end up installing them because the original plan was a car-port renovation with 2x Tesla WC on dedicated circuits with load sharing, but life got in the way. So I’m charging off a 15A GPO until further notice. The Reno might happen in a couple of years’ time if the planets align. But what I have works for now.
 
Last edited:
When you go down the rabbit hole of Type B - I have to ask, are we still talking about fire, or other stuff? This discussion really is about whether constant 15A (or even 10A) EV charging should be allowed through a GPO, and the risk of fire (not electrocution).
Not anymore. We are talking about behavioural traits and where they lead to, especially if they are amplified by a strong lobbying group. In the case of adding more regulations to EV charging installations (in comparison to, for example, using N95 respirators to protect against airborne infections), there are so many lobbying groups which will support it unanimously. You should think about preserving that diesel car in a good shape just in case, there may be a witch hunt, you know.
 
Not anymore. We are talking about behavioural traits and where they lead to, especially if they are amplified by a strong lobbying group. In the case of adding more regulations to EV charging installations (in comparison to, for example, using N95 respirators to protect against airborne infections), there are so many lobbying groups which will support it unanimously. You should think about preserving that diesel car in a good shape just in case, there may be a witch hunt, you know.
Ok. All good. My 4WD ICE in the driveway will save me. Actually the reason I bought a Tesla was to keep the kays off the ICE. I want to keep it forever.
 
Electrocution and fires from the lack of earth leakage protection on the other hand is a well known, and yet politicians refuse to mandate their retrofit over a reasonable period of time. If they cannot get their heads around that danger, than ev charging is going to be well down their thinking process.

My house is relatively modern, built in the 1990s. The main board in the house had RCDs for all the power circuits, but only current overload breakers on the lighting circuits. For a variety of reasons, I wanted the board upgraded to bring it into 21st century safety standards, and had the whole thing replaced and reconfigured in 2022. It wasn’t that horrendously expensive to get peace of mind (and the right house circuits backed up by my PW2 if the grid goes down).
 
15A circuits are always

It is very logically recommended in the standard that 15A power outlet has a dedicated circuit.

That depends on the application really. I recent installed three 15A outlets on one circuit protected by a 16A RCBO because the customer had an appliance that they moved between the outlets that were relatively close, there was no intention to use them all at once. Cost would have increased with 3 cable runs and 3 RCBOs.

Its GENERALLY logical to only install 1x 15A outlet on a circuit because by definition if you are installing a `15A socket-outlet you are logically using a high current device and most of the time its usually installed using the same 2.5mm2 cable as regular 10A socket outlets. This is also providing a functionally useful installation.

In the end, you are using the circuit breaker to protect the fixed cabling, not the customers load. However, its not UNSAFE to put 10 15A or combination of 15 and 10A sockets on the one circuit.

A bit like an average residential single phase installation usually has a 63A CB as a main switch but many sub circuit CB's that add up to way more than that.
 
struggling to find any mention of differentiation between wiring rules for temporary and continuous loads
👍 There is no differentiation. All wiring should be able to handle continuous loads - (according to my electrician)

The 15A UMC pig tail does not have an industrial screw type plug.
Correct, the aftermarket tails are 20A /32A. Presumably they are modified from the CEE plugs.
Though evchargers have told me they can modify a 15A OEM tail to an industrial IP66 plug ith a locking ring. However it is not necessary.

the minimum standard should be a dedicated 15-amp circuit with an industrial plug style plug
I dont agree. It is also not necessary to mandate a 15A socket for residences. For many a 10A is enough to charge their EV. The main difference between an Industrial socket and a standard residential socket is the IP rating and robust construction.
 

Attachments

  • Screen Shot 2024-02-21 at 10.33.15 am.png
    Screen Shot 2024-02-21 at 10.33.15 am.png
    177.2 KB · Views: 29
  • Like
Reactions: paulp
👍 There is no differentiation. All wiring should be able to handle continuous loads - (according to my electrician)

This misconception comes from, I think, people reading about rules in the USA and thinking they apply here. My understanding is that in the USA a distinction is made in the wiring rules between continuous and non-continuous draw, whereas here there isn’t. A 10A socket here must have cabling connected of the right rating that copes with continuous draw.

This is why the original tails that came with the UMC here were rated 8/10A and 12/15A and not 10/10A and 15/15A. It was purely Tesla’s default application of US wiring practice to other markets, de-rating the nominal current by 20% to meet continuous load requirements. Thankfully this has now been rectified here.
 
  • Like
Reactions: moa999 and Quickst
👍 There is no differentiation. All wiring should be able to handle continuous loads - (according to my electrician)
It is more about all fixing screws have to be tightened appropriately to handle continuous loads and not fall off, all power points should be appropriately attached to the walls and not fall off in one year to provide more jobs for fellow electicians, all wiring should be at the required current specification and not less because it is cheaper, in outdoor settings outdoor power points should be used etc etc etc.