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bleeding our brakes

Saghost

Well-Known Member
Oct 9, 2013
8,224
7,098
Delaware
Why? I wouldn't be the one doing the pump pump holding!

Jk good to know. I wasn't sure since our pedals also act as an on switch for the car, brake to hold, etc. didn't know if the hydraulics were actuated electronically vs, mechanically

Autopilot cars use Bosch's iBooster system - which basically means it's a traditional unboosted hydraulic system - but with an electric motor geared to press on the master cylinder piston in addition to the pedal pushing on it as normal.
 
I support the use of a vacuum pump for bleeding brakes. especially for older cars. The brake master cylinder piston works in a small range within the cylinder leaving the build up of corrosion possible in the areas that are not swept by the piston. Using the brake pedal to push fluid can create a leak in the piston seals when they enter the normally unused portion of the master cylinder bore. It's much better and easier to attach a hand vacuum pump at each wheel and just keep the master cylinder reservoir topped up during the bleeding process. I use the vacuum pump to suck out most of the old fluid from the master reservoir then fill it with fresh fluid before starting the bleeding process at the wheels. Changing fluid every two years seems like a good rule, in my opinion.
 
I support the use of a vacuum pump for bleeding brakes. especially for older cars. The brake master cylinder piston works in a small range within the cylinder leaving the build up of corrosion possible in the areas that are not swept by the piston. Using the brake pedal to push fluid can create a leak in the piston seals when they enter the normally unused portion of the master cylinder bore. It's much better and easier to attach a hand vacuum pump at each wheel and just keep the master cylinder reservoir topped up during the bleeding process. I use the vacuum pump to suck out most of the old fluid from the master reservoir then fill it with fresh fluid before starting the bleeding process at the wheels. Changing fluid every two years seems like a good rule, in my opinion.

Thanks for this advice and info. Very helpful!
 
  • Helpful
Reactions: Cricket88
While I see this is an old thread, I'd like to point something out: these cars can be bled like a conventional car, but there additional steps involved. Tesla (and Brembo) says to NOT use a vacuum system to bleed the brakes on these. Recommended procedure is to pressurize the system from the reservoir, and crack the bleeders, starting from the driver's side, outer bleeder, then the inner, and back to the outer. Repeat for passenger's front, driver's rear, and finally passenger's rear. Then, go back and do a manual bleed in the same fashion, starting with the driver's outer. Hope this helps.

Yes, you will use a ton of fluid going this route, but you are 100% guaranteed to flush all old fluid from the system.
 
does anyone here know whether our brakes can be bled conventionally like ICE cars via pumping the brakes while cracking bleeder screws?
I highly recommend using the Motive Products 108 Brake System Power Bleeder (US$59 on Amazon) and it comes with an 1108 master cylinder adapter for the Tesla. This makes it a one-person job without getting any brake fluid on parts. I have had one of these for about 15 years and used it on VWs and Mercedes (with different adapters), and now with the 1108 adapter (same as used on GM cars) my old 250 system works beautifully on my 2017 Model S 75D. In case you were wondering why I already had to bleed my almost new brakes, I have had my stock calipers powder coated red by Alloy Wheel Repair Specialists, and the calipers had to be removed for that job. Happy DIYing
 
I highly recommend using the Motive Products 108 Brake System Power Bleeder (US$59 on Amazon) and it comes with an 1108 master cylinder adapter for the Tesla. This makes it a one-person job without getting any brake fluid on parts. I have had one of these for about 15 years and used it on VWs and Mercedes (with different adapters), and now with the 1108 adapter (same as used on GM cars) my old 250 system works beautifully on my 2017 Model S 75D. In case you were wondering why I already had to bleed my almost new brakes, I have had my stock calipers powder coated red by Alloy Wheel Repair Specialists, and the calipers had to be removed for that job. Happy DIYing

Interesting! The Motive website's application guide suggests using the 1118 cap fpr all Tesla cars. I have just bought one on Amazon and was planning on flushing my brakes this weekend on the Model S. I'll report back to let you all know how it goes!
 
1118 cap works great.

• Roughly 2 hours required, from prep to clean up
• Engage "jack mode"
• You may want to suck out most, not all, of the old brake fluid prior to starting
• Use a jack stand for safety
• One wheel at a time is OK
• Bleed screw at the caliper is 11mm. Open end wrench is OK
• Use two fresh quarts of DOT4 brake fluid. After job was finished, 1-1/2 quarts were used
• Be sure pressurizer cap is turned at least 1/4 to 1/3 revolution, and fully seated
• Pressurize system to 5 psi only. Greater pressure will cause leaks.
 

SteelClouds

Member
Supporting Member
Nov 12, 2021
422
565
CA
I know this is an "older" thread but the Motive bleeder I bought leaked like a sieve at 5psi. I ended up returning it and bought a FirstInfo ( imported) rig with 3 caps for EU cars and all teslas ( which means most US too).. much nicer rig with better hose, metal caps, shutoff valve on the bleed hose and so on. It was not much more than the Motive. They recommend 5PSI but the manual from Tesla says 30 psi.. I bleed the fronts at 5 PSI without any issue other than it was a bit slow.
 

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