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bleeding our brakes

Discussion in 'Model S' started by Cricket88, Feb 2, 2017.

  1. Cricket88

    Cricket88 Member

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    does anyone here know whether our brakes can be bled conventionally like ICE cars via pumping the brakes while cracking bleeder screws?
     
  2. Lloyd

    Lloyd Well-Known Member

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    Yes yes you can
     
  3. bishoppeak

    bishoppeak Member

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    I'd recommend investing in a Griot's Garage vacuum bleeder. One man operation and not as messy.
     
  4. Cricket88

    Cricket88 Member

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    Why? I wouldn't be the one doing the pump pump holding!

    Jk good to know. I wasn't sure since our pedals also act as an on switch for the car, brake to hold, etc. didn't know if the hydraulics were actuated electronically vs, mechanically
     
  5. Saghost

    Saghost Active Member

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    Autopilot cars use Bosch's iBooster system - which basically means it's a traditional unboosted hydraulic system - but with an electric motor geared to press on the master cylinder piston in addition to the pedal pushing on it as normal.
     
  6. Don85D

    Don85D Member

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    I support the use of a vacuum pump for bleeding brakes. especially for older cars. The brake master cylinder piston works in a small range within the cylinder leaving the build up of corrosion possible in the areas that are not swept by the piston. Using the brake pedal to push fluid can create a leak in the piston seals when they enter the normally unused portion of the master cylinder bore. It's much better and easier to attach a hand vacuum pump at each wheel and just keep the master cylinder reservoir topped up during the bleeding process. I use the vacuum pump to suck out most of the old fluid from the master reservoir then fill it with fresh fluid before starting the bleeding process at the wheels. Changing fluid every two years seems like a good rule, in my opinion.
     
    • Informative x 2
    • Helpful x 1
  7. artsci

    artsci Sponsor

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    Thanks for this advice and info. Very helpful!
     
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