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How are Texan Tesla owners dealing w/ unreliable and expensive electricity?

I have both a son and a brother that live in Texas (Austin and Dallas). Visiting them both pretty regularly, I’m amazed by both the number of big old pick-up trucks but also Teslas (mostly in the Austin area).

How is owning a Tesla in a state known to be very conservative, not ones to think global climate change is real, not wanting to embrace changes in our future energy needs? It’s a state that made a good deal of its wealth from the oil industry.

Now that the state’s arrogance in regards to electrical power has come back to haunt the populace, what has been the impact on driving your Tesla? From speaking to both my brother and son, they say electrical power is really expensive, and as displayed this week, unreliable. What have you done differently? Uber? Own both a ICE vehicle during times your power might go out?

I cannot relate, honestly. I live in the Seattle area. We have an over abundance of electrical power, which we typically sell to other states. We don’t rely on oil or gas; 80% of our power comes from renewable resources such as hydro and wind/solar panels. I have solar panels on my home and they generate 80% of our electrical needs, to include powering our heat and two EVs (Tesla and Kiro Niro EV).

It amazes me how some states can be so different in their temperament and viewpoints on such things as energy, technology, medicine. I see Texas is also leading the country (or furthest behind, depending on your viewpoint) in vaccinating their population. Texas is such a vibrant state; full of great resources, University’s and growing tech industries. Why so backwards in other areas?

I thought about folks that might have gotten stranded in the middle of nowhere at a Supercharger, needing to recharge and not having enough power to even heat your car while waiting/hoping for the power to return. That could have ended tragically i bet if someone was very low on power and stuck where they had no ability to find shelter indoors.

Hope all is well.
 

glide

Active Member
Jun 6, 2018
4,778
6,622
USA
I have both a son and a brother that live in Texas (Austin and Dallas). Visiting them both pretty regularly, I’m amazed by both the number of big old pick-up trucks but also Teslas (mostly in the Austin area).

How is owning a Tesla in a state known to be very conservative, not ones to think global climate change is real, not wanting to embrace changes in our future energy needs? It’s a state that made a good deal of its wealth from the oil industry.

Now that the state’s arrogance in regards to electrical power has come back to haunt the populace, what has been the impact on driving your Tesla? From speaking to both my brother and son, they say electrical power is really expensive, and as displayed this week, unreliable. What have you done differently? Uber? Own both a ICE vehicle during times your power might go out?

I cannot relate, honestly. I live in the Seattle area. We have an over abundance of electrical power, which we typically sell to other states. We don’t rely on oil or gas; 80% of our power comes from renewable resources such as hydro and wind/solar panels. I have solar panels on my home and they generate 80% of our electrical needs, to include powering our heat and two EVs (Tesla and Kiro Niro EV).

It amazes me how some states can be so different in their temperament and viewpoints on such things as energy, technology, medicine. I see Texas is also leading the country (or furthest behind, depending on your viewpoint) in vaccinating their population. Texas is such a vibrant state; full of great resources, University’s and growing tech industries. Why so backwards in other areas?

I thought about folks that might have gotten stranded in the middle of nowhere at a Supercharger, needing to recharge and not having enough power to even heat your car while waiting/hoping for the power to return. That could have ended tragically i bet if someone was very low on power and stuck where they had no ability to find shelter indoors.

Hope all is well.
How are you amazed that different states have different people with differing priorities and different political viewpoints?

It is central to the American experience. There are plenty of reasons why I don’t live in Texas but that way of life is obviously attractive to many, many people.

And why is your concern limited to Tesla owners? You realize gas pumps operate on electricity too, right? Or are you hoping all the truck owners freeze to death because their views do not align with yours?
 
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Texas has neither expensive nor unreliable electricity. This was the worst winter storm for the area, ever. Should the state have been better prepared? Yes... but an even bigger storm could come next time.

it’s a balance to have the right amount of preparation... and this time we failed.

EDIT: and if their electricity is all of a sudden expensive, they likely have a variable rate plan, which is risky itself
 
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SageBrush

REJECT Fascism
May 7, 2015
13,275
18,036
New Mexico
It is central to the American experience. There are plenty of reasons why I don’t live in Texas but that way of life is obviously attractive to many, many people.
Sort of, with a heaping dose of gerrymandering.

I was saddened to read that Biden declared Texas a disaster, opening up the federal purse to get them past this latest catastrophe of their own making. I really dislike the Texas scam of privatization of riches and socialization of losses.
 
Honestly I did not consider that gas stations would be without power. Good point. After I posted my previous post I googled and noted Texas power is not that expensive. I actually am very fond of many aspects of Texas, except for a good deal of their political and social policies, etc. Austin is an amazingly diverse and vibrant city, having spent probably three weeks a year visiting it over the last five years. I also have lived their a number of months while attending military training with the Air Force.

I was amazed by all the big trucks, especially compared to the Seattle area.

That being said, I’ve discussed with my brother and my daughter in law’s father why EVs might be difficult in state that is as vast and relatively sparsely developed, especially in the western part of the state. I own a big Nissan Titan, so I appreciate the advantages of a pick up truck.

As an aside, it never ceases to amaze me how many folks come on to this forum and bad mouth folks they don’t know, based on one post. I’m a church attending, gun toting, beer drinking, truck driving, retired military member. After twenty years serving as an infantry officer, I've spent 18 years working as a firefighter in downtown Seattle.

Thanks for passing on m, where you decided I wished ill will on my fellow man. Having seen much heart ache, death and tragedy in my two careers, I can assure you I have zero desire to see others suffer or face loss, illness or injury.

“Judge ye and judge me not”
 
Texas has neither expensive nor unreliable electricity. This was the worst winter storm for the area, ever. Should the state have been better prepared? Yes... but an even bigger storm could come next time.

it’s a balance to have the right amount of preparation... and this time we failed.

EDIT: and if their electricity is all of a sudden expensive, they likely have a variable rate plan, which is risky itself
Appreciate your mature, level headed response. I’ll say a prayer for you, along with all the other Texans that are suffering. My son just got his power back, but still has no water, and shelves are empty in the stores. Hopefully Texas learns something from this crisis. It does seem odd that a state with so much open space and sunshine, along with great research universities, etc have not embraced solar or wind power more aggressively. The days of relying on oil based energy will soon be in our past for the most part.
 

CapeOne

Active Member
Jun 14, 2016
1,091
771
New England
It does seem odd that a state with so much open space and sunshine, along with great research universities, etc have not embraced solar or wind power more aggressively. The days of relying on oil based energy will soon be in our past for the most part.

Texas has been investing heavily in wind and solar energy.

Wind power installation surged in 2020, especially in Texas
February 5, 2021
2020 was a strong year for wind industry, especially in Texas

Solar Power Booms in Texas
November 28, 2020
Solar Power Booms in Texas

Texas leads the US in wind power — and now it’s ramping up solar, too
February 21, 2020
Texas is the US leader in wind — and now it's ramping up solar - Electrek

Texas ranks first in U.S.-installed wind capacity and number of turbines
July 31, 2019
Texas ranks first in U.S.-installed wind capacity and number of turbines - Today in Energy - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Poised To Become National Leader In Solar Power
June 19, 2019
Texas Poised To Become National Leader In Solar Power
 
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TT97

Active Member
Aug 6, 2017
2,178
3,003
Los Angeles
I was saddened to read that Biden declared Texas a disaster, opening up the federal purse to get them past this latest catastrophe of their own making. I really dislike the Texas scam of privatization of riches and socialization of losses.

While it is the State's doing, you can't make millions of innocent residents suffer for the short-sightness/greediness of a handful of people. Not all of us can fly off to Cancun to get away from the situation. We are still one country and we need to look out for everyone in the country.
 
I will try be as little political as possible. Preparation, preparation preparation. the company should have prepare better, but that is what happen when they do not have to. Sometimes regulations are needed to ensure companies do what they are suppose to do to avoid disasters like this one. the storm although is rare it has happened before. I know that some people believe that business will take the best decisions without the government control. here an example where that is not necessarily true. Reliability and safety measure sometimes goes against the bottom end.
 
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glide

Active Member
Jun 6, 2018
4,778
6,622
USA
Honestly I did not consider that gas stations would be without power. Good point. After I posted my previous post I googled and noted Texas power is not that expensive. I actually am very fond of many aspects of Texas, except for a good deal of their political and social policies, etc. Austin is an amazingly diverse and vibrant city, having spent probably three weeks a year visiting it over the last five years. I also have lived their a number of months while attending military training with the Air Force.

I was amazed by all the big trucks, especially compared to the Seattle area.

That being said, I’ve discussed with my brother and my daughter in law’s father why EVs might be difficult in state that is as vast and relatively sparsely developed, especially in the western part of the state. I own a big Nissan Titan, so I appreciate the advantages of a pick up truck.

As an aside, it never ceases to amaze me how many folks come on to this forum and bad mouth folks they don’t know, based on one post. I’m a church attending, gun toting, beer drinking, truck driving, retired military member. After twenty years serving as an infantry officer, I've spent 18 years working as a firefighter in downtown Seattle.

Thanks for passing on m, where you decided I wished ill will on my fellow man. Having seen much heart ache, death and tragedy in my two careers, I can assure you I have zero desire to see others suffer or face loss, illness or injury.

“Judge ye and judge me not”
Don’t you get it? You’re the one judging people.

Re-read your original post. What is “backwards” to you is freedom of choice to others.

How the residents of that state chose to deal with this freak occurrence once the dust settles really has no bearing on life in the Seattle area.
 

h2ofun

Active Member
Aug 11, 2020
3,649
872
auburn, ca
Honestly I did not consider that gas stations would be without power. Good point. After I posted my previous post I googled and noted Texas power is not that expensive. I actually am very fond of many aspects of Texas, except for a good deal of their political and social policies, etc. Austin is an amazingly diverse and vibrant city, having spent probably three weeks a year visiting it over the last five years. I also have lived their a number of months while attending military training with the Air Force.

I was amazed by all the big trucks, especially compared to the Seattle area.

That being said, I’ve discussed with my brother and my daughter in law’s father why EVs might be difficult in state that is as vast and relatively sparsely developed, especially in the western part of the state. I own a big Nissan Titan, so I appreciate the advantages of a pick up truck.

As an aside, it never ceases to amaze me how many folks come on to this forum and bad mouth folks they don’t know, based on one post. I’m a church attending, gun toting, beer drinking, truck driving, retired military member. After twenty years serving as an infantry officer, I've spent 18 years working as a firefighter in downtown Seattle.

Thanks for passing on m, where you decided I wished ill will on my fellow man. Having seen much heart ache, death and tragedy in my two careers, I can assure you I have zero desire to see others suffer or face loss, illness or injury.

“Judge ye and judge me not”
Best way to deal with the folks who love to live in the mud, is not to join them. Otherwise, all folks see are two muddy people
 

nwdiver

Well-Known Member
Feb 17, 2013
8,856
12,943
United States
How are you amazed that different states have different people with differing priorities and different political viewpoints?

.... because those differing priorities are based on the fantasy that windmills cause blackouts, most people would prefer prolonged power outages over FERC regulations that would.... prevent blackouts.... and this absurd idea that 'the weak will perish' is somehow an acceptable view in a modern country....

Different opinions are fine... so long as they're based on reality.
 
Last edited:

h2ofun

Active Member
Aug 11, 2020
3,649
872
auburn, ca
I will try be as little political as possible. Preparation, preparation preparation. the company should have prepare better, but that is what happen when they do not have to. Sometimes regulations are needed to ensure companies do what they are suppose to do to avoid disasters like this one. the storm although is rare it has happened before. I know that some people believe that business will take the best decisions without the government control. here an example where that is not necessarily true. Reliability and safety measure sometimes goes against the bottom end.
This should be a wake up call for ANYONE living in the US! Even though shortly I maybe close to 100% energy independent of the grid, I am not for food and water. Another thing on my list to work! To see folks begging for water after just 2 days should be a wake up call for us all. And the answer is US, not the government
 
I pay under 11 cents a kW, so, not expensive at all compared to some rates I have seen on this forum. Luckily I only experienced the 'rolling brownouts' so our power shut off about every 2-3 hours for about 45 minutes at a time on Wednesday (the worse day of this for our house by far). The other days we lost power for maybe 2-3 hours total out of the 24 hour period. Although the AWD Tesla did great in the snow/ice, we didn't drive it too much, so it never needed much juice. I did drive past empty gas stations without power and a couple that must have had generators where the lines were, well, just what you can imagine.

.... because those differing priorities are based on the fantasy the windmills cause blackouts, most people would prefer prolonged power outages over FERC regulations that would.... prevent blackouts.... and this absurd idea that 'the weak will perish' is somehow an acceptable view in a modern country....

Different options are fine... so long as they're based on reality.

100%

I was so disappointed that so many friends were posting that (windmill) crap on FB. I usually stay out of those (political) convos but had to call a few of them out, not that they cared or admitted to any wrong-doing. Just know we are not all that way here but unfortunately it is the majority still...
 
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brkaus

Well-Known Member
Jul 8, 2014
8,507
7,141
Austin, TX
I never lost electricity, but our two nearest stations were out of gas.

didn’t bother me at all. Charged the cars when the threat of storm was announced and kept them charged.

We would have had three electric cars to hang out in for heat if need be. Each would have lasted for days if were were conservative and not warmed them up too much.

heck, didn’t have anywhere to go anyway. Just went into the office once to be sure the water main was off and pipes drained.

reality is all transportation methods have done risks involved. Just like home electric, gas, and water.

want to be self reliant? Get a big propane tank and a whole house generator. Bigger the propane tank the better.
 

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