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Is there a plug common to the Model S, Nissan Leaf and Chevy Volt charging system?

Discussion in 'Electric Vehicles' started by Seven7, Jul 28, 2013.

  1. Seven7

    Seven7 Member

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    #1 Seven7, Jul 28, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2013
    I have a commercial rental building in Sarasota, Fl. and I would like to install a plug for the tenants customers to charge their EVs. I can't really spring for a charger, but will gladly pay for my electrician to put in a 35 amp 220 outlet in the parking lot. Here is my question-- what outlet is the most universal? I think most Model S owners have a 14-50 adapter for their universal charger, but what about Nissan Leafs, Chevy Volts and Ford Focus? Can they also use a 14-50? I'm open to suggestions.

    Thanks!

    ETA: To add ford Focus EV
     
  2. doug

    doug Administrator / Head Moderator

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    Hmm... not sure how common it is for Leaf and Volt owners to carry 240V mobile connectors. The ambitious among them certainly have them, but it's a far smaller percentage than that of Tesla owners.

    If you do provide a NEMA 14-50 it has to be able to supply 50A peak, 40A continuous. If you only have 35A available, your best bet for all involved really is a 7.7kW J1772 EVSE. Sure you can't work it into your budget?

    Here's one I found on Amazon. Amazon.com: Leviton EVB32-M5L 7.7KW Charging Station with 25-Feet Cable: Home Improvement

    There should be cheaper options available.
     
  3. Seven7

    Seven7 Member

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    I can't really pay for the charger at almost $1k (we are trying to promote the location and the new business) but that building has massive power available so almost any amp rating is not a problem, (three phase and 220 on separate panels) Even multiple outlets would be acceptable.
     
  4. Larry Chanin

    Larry Chanin Model S Perf Sig 1055

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    Joe,

    All three can charge off of a 110v outlet, but it would be almost useless for a Model S.

    If the Leaf and Volt owners buy a charger like this device (and terminate it with a NEMA 14-50 plug) they can charge off of a 240v NEMA 14-50 outlet just like the Tesla's Mobile Connector. However, most Leaf and Volt owners don't go to this effort and carry portable 240v charging devices.

    Sorry realistically, the best solution for universal charging for Teslas, Leafs and Volts is a conventional J1772 charger which is usually 30 amps.

    For charging Model Ss it would be best to install a NEMA 14-50 outlet behind a 50 amp breaker. This will permit 40 amp continuous charging.

    Larry
     
  5. Jason S

    Jason S Model S Sig Perf (P85)

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    Stub out a circuit with a 110V as an optional plug, let the first owner/renter that wants the spot provide a charger.
     
  6. dhrivnak

    dhrivnak Active Member

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    I would really plan and wire for a J-1772 charging unit. All cars can use the J-1772 standard and they are coming down in price. A 110 is a nice low cost addtion but J-1772 is that you need to plan for longer term.
     
  7. markwj

    markwj Moderator, Asia Pacific

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    Currently, I would suggest that the J1772 connector is 'the standard', but that means a charging station. If you are not charging (sic) for the electricity, I think US$500-US$1,000 +installation is the going rate for a basic unit. That federal tax incentive still exists to cover 30% of the cost, right?
     
  8. Zythryn

    Zythryn MS 70D, MX 90D

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    In addition, if LEED points are a factor for you, car chargers are worth LEED points.
    Alternatively, a couple of 110 outlets as well as a couple of NEMA 14-50s would work well for many.

    An extra request... Please don't put the charge spots in really nice parking spots. It will lead to the spots being filled with vehicles that don't need the charge.
     
  9. Seven7

    Seven7 Member

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    The electricity would be free for the customer parked there, not sure how to phrase this, but were not going to charge money for the electrical charge. We are trying to attract a certain kind of customer. I'm leaning towards a 14-50 plug with 50 amp breaker and a 110 outlet (not sure of the amps for this) anybody have more thoughts on this? Thanks!!
     
  10. Larry Chanin

    Larry Chanin Model S Perf Sig 1055

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    Joe,

    You may be eligible for a tax credit.

    Section 30C credit for Alternative Fuel Vehicle Refueling Property includes a 30 percent credit, capped at $30,000 for business/investment use per site. This means that any business who installed EV charging stations in 2012 or who plans to install EV charging stations in 2013 may qualify for up to a $30,000 tax credit per site. For more information, visit: US CODE: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/26/30C (Subject to change, updated by the IRS) I suggest you consult your tax advisor to determine your eligibility.

    Larry

    - - - Updated - - -

    Having a 14-50 for Model Ss and a 110v outlet for Leafs and Volts would work. As was mentioned the 14-50 could draw 40 amps continuous behind a 50 amp breaker. The 110v would draw up to 12 volts continuous behind a 15 amp breaker.

    Larry
     
  11. bollar

    bollar Disgruntled Member

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    I would be grateful for whatever service you provided, but high-amperage J1772 is the more elegant solution.
     
  12. DEinspanjer

    DEinspanjer Member

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    I would suggest running a 60 80 or 100 amp line out to each of the locations and start with a simple dual outlet, 14-50 and 5-15 (I.e. one RV plug and one 110 outlet).
    The outlets are fairly cheap, the 110 will be servicable for the cars with smaller batteries, and the 50 amp will make the teslas happy.

    If you run a higher amp line and circuit, then it is a straightforward upgrade to a clipper creek cs-90 or so that would make everyone happy if the temporary outlets draw interest and show value.

    Sent from my GT-P7510 using Tapatalk HD
     
  13. brianman

    brianman Burrito Founder

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    I heartily recommend you seriously consider chatting up the Florida TMC group(s). You may find that they'll pitch in to buy some or all of the charger for you. Free (to us) power "after initial install costs" is very appealing to pretty much anyone on TMC -- especially the 70+ A variety.
     
  14. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    Keep an eye out for grant programs that give out free J1772 EVSEs to businesses interested in hosting them...

    Project Get Ready | Chargers
     
  15. mknox

    mknox Well-Known Member

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    Usually, those "really nice spots" are close to the building in order to be close to the electrical room. Moving them further away would mean extra costs associated with the trenching and longer lengths of cable. I'm dealing with this now as I try to site charger(s) at my office.
     
  16. Andrew

    Andrew Model S #6151

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    I know the installation budget is tight, but I think it's worth mentioning that many of us likely leave our UMC charging cable hanging in the garage on most days. So if I happen to be driving around town and find myself at a location that offers a 14-50 outlet, I wouldn't actually be able to plug in anyway.

    But if there's a J1772, I can just grab my adapter (which I keep in the car) and charge for a few minutes.
     
  17. TonyWilliams

    TonyWilliams Active Member

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    Please only include 120 volt outlets with some "real" outlets. For Tesla, obviously NEMA 14-50 on a 50 amp breaker.

    For LEAF, thousands have had their charge cord modified to L6-20 and L6-30.

    So, each spot could have all four:

    NEMA 14-50 (240 volt 50 amp... 25-35 miles per hour)
    NEMA L6-30 (240 volt 30 amp... 15-25 miles per hour)
    NEMA L6-20 (240 volt 20 amp... 10-15 miles per hour)
    NEMA. 5-15 (120 volt 15 amp... 3-5 miles per hour)
     
  18. mknox

    mknox Well-Known Member

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    I'm in the same boat. I'm toying with the idea of a second UMC and keeping the existing one at home as a "poor man's" HPWC as I hear about more and more NEMA 14-50s going in.
     
  19. Galve2000

    Galve2000 Member

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    I currently only have a Volt which can only pull amaximum of 16 amps from a 230 Volt socket. Still I am investing in a 100 amp clipper creek CS-100 for my summer home because I will be getting a Model Swith "twin chargers" in the near future. With the Tesla to J1772adapter the Model S (with twin chargers) can get about 60 miles per hour ofrange. the Clipper Creek unit is not inexpensive but NY state is covering partof the cost of the installation, and the Federal government is covering another (smaller) part of the costs so my out of pocket expenses, while not insignificant,are reasonable. I want to do this work once and be done. I want to futureproof.

    In a perfect world I would spend the money to get a second line from the localpower company that is on a separate bill (on its own meter) that feeds into thegarage directly. 200 Amps going into the garage. 100 amps for the 100amp EVSElike the clipper creek, and a second 50 amp line for a 14-50 or 6-50 outletthat a second BEV. Then i could leave the panels that go into the houseuntouched. In this way my BEV charging needs would not push me to a highertier. (we are already on the highest tier AFAIK so its not like there is any added penalty for BEV charging) However, I don't even want to think about what it will be like getting the local power co to do this installation. I suspect would take until summer 2015.

    so having an electrician pull 100 ampsfrom one of the existing panels will have to do for now.
     
  20. TurboFroggy

    TurboFroggy Member

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    You might want to contact The EV Project: http://www.theevproject.com/contact.php
    It looks like they are starting to install in Florida. They will provide the equipment for free and subsidize the install costs.
     

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