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Someone Opened the Door Manually

I gave a friend a ride in our M3 and she opened the passenger door with the physical handle despite the bright open-door buttons I'd applied.

I'm guessing no significant damage from that one occurence?

I'll have to remember to warn passengers ahead of time.
No damage will be done. Just don't make it habit. Any time I have someone in my car who has never exited the vehicle before, I always let me them know ahead of time to simply press the button.
 
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jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Moderator
Nov 28, 2018
14,173
17,874
Riverside Co. CA
Its done man, you now need to make a diminished value claim with your insurance, and dump the car.






JK of course, it should be ok, but the manual used to warn about the fact it could damage the trim around the door. I dont know if it still has that warning. Take a look at the trim around your passenger door, but it should be ok as long as you dont have people make a habit of it.
 
Its done man, you now need to make a diminished value claim with your insurance, and dump the car.






JK of course, it should be ok, but the manual used to warn about the fact it could damage the trim around the door. I dont know if it still has that warning. Take a look at the trim around your passenger door, but it should be ok as long as you dont have people make a habit of it.
I was about to say "part out".
 
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As others have said, nothing to worry about. If you pay attention to the window seal you can see why its preferable for the window to drop slightly before the door being pushed open. That, I assume, is why they made the exterior door handles and awkward to stage process to open them. What I don't understand, is why not just use the method all other manufacturers use for frameless windows. My Porsche 911 had a micro switch that would trigger when the handle was slightly pulled and would drop the window. As long as you didn't abruptly yank the door open it worked just fine.
 
I heard a rumor that recent software updates have mitigated the concern by automatically doing the window-drop as with the “proper” button when the car has power. True? Is there still a warning on the console?

you are correct. in the old days using emergency release would not trigger the window to go down to make space for the rubber/metal trim. So if you were to open the car all the time like that it would damage the window and the trim eventually. However nowadays it does also cause the window to go down a bit so the only real difference is that if you open the door too quickly you can still damage the trim. Like if you press the button theres like a 1 second delay before the door unlocks.
 
As others have said, nothing to worry about. If you pay attention to the window seal you can see why its preferable for the window to drop slightly before the door being pushed open. That, I assume, is why they made the exterior door handles and awkward to stage process to open them. What I don't understand, is why not just use the method all other manufacturers use for frameless windows. My Porsche 911 had a micro switch that would trigger when the handle was slightly pulled and would drop the window. As long as you didn't abruptly yank the door open it worked just fine.
Which is easier and has less parts, an electronic button or a manual lever tied to a micro switch that drops the window... :rolleyes:

"The best part is no part, the best process is no process"
 
Which is easier and has less parts, an electronic button or a manual lever tied to a micro switch that drops the window... :rolleyes:

"The best part is no part, the best process is no process"

In the Tesla, it's a button AND a manual lever, in addition to a servo/motor that actually actuates the door latch. So to answer your question, the Tesla configuration has many more parts involved, not to mention now you have to explain to passengers how to properly exit your vehicle without damaging the window seal, and in the event of an emergency you now have to remember a completely different method of opening the door than your muscle memory is programmed for. So, the button is cooler but far more complex, less practical and less user friendly than the standard lever and micro switch.
 
Had it happen to me. I didn't even know about the manual handle until my friend pulled it.

It's already happened multiple times in my car (in the 4 months of ownership). I chalk part of that up to the manual release lever being in a very similar place to the passenger door handle in the 3rd gen RX7 that I had a while back. Friends/family just got accustomed to that location.
 

blkswn

2020 M3 LR AWD
Sep 22, 2020
53
29
Los Angeles
As mentioned by others, under normal and usual operating conditions, the manual release operates the door exactly like the button. It gives you a warning because if it truly is an emergency or something is not operating properly with the door, the window may not roll down to clear the trim and may gouge the trim or cause the window to shatter.
 

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