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Tire repair kit on Tesla tires with sponge lining

Hi. Does anyone know if a foam tire repair kit, such as the one sold by tesla, works on the low road noise tires with a sponge lining running around the inside? My model 3 was supplied with Michelin Pilot sport TO tires which have such a lining. I'm not sure tire foam would penetrate it and plug any holes underneath.

Cheers.
 
I would assume that it would work since Tesla sells it for their cars and most (if not all) of the OEM tires on them have the sound-deadening foam strip. I have the Tesla compressor kit, but haven't had to use it. I also carry a plug kit and would always use that instead as my first choice.

I am also interested in hearing from anybody that has tried the Tesla kit on their OEM tires.
 

afadeev

Active Member
Feb 28, 2019
1,039
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NYC
My car was just at the SC and they would not plug the tire (on the tread) which was odd. They would have dug out the liner and plugged from the inside and said the audible profile would change and I would not like it. FWIW
That's your mistake for taking the car with tires issues to a dealership.
Find a local tire shop, and they will plug the tire without inventing lame excuses.

I have also read that tire shops have refused to patch tires that are full of "Goop".
That's not true.
The "goop" residue would need to be cleaned from the patch area, but it's not hard. I've personally had multiple tires patched after on-the-road emergency sealer application.

The tire sealant does leave a bit of a mess on the rim and the TPMS sensor, and those will need to be cleaned up during installation of the new tires on the rim (when the time comes). That will be the time when whomever is installing the tires will utter a few unkind words about the person who had used tire sealant. ;-)

I’m under the impression that Tesla’s slime-based compressor kit should not be used with their OEM acoustic foam tires.

Tire sealant is designed to work itself into the area of the tire that is leaking air, and clog it.
The foam will be a minor barrier to the tire sealant doing its job. Since air is leaking past the foam, so will the sealant, and it will still seal the cut as long as it's not too large.

The bigger problem may come from uneven absorption of sealant into the foam around the circumference of the tire. That may compromise the balance of the tire, and introduce vibrations. Since you want to get the wheel to a competent tire shop to properly patch the tire anyway, it will be only a temporary problem.

HTH,
a
 
That's your mistake for taking the car with tires issues to a dealership.
Find a local tire shop, and they will plug the tire without inventing lame excuses.


That's not true.
The "goop" residue would need to be cleaned from the patch area, but it's not hard. I've personally had multiple tires patched after on-the-road emergency sealer application.

The tire sealant does leave a bit of a mess on the rim and the TPMS sensor, and those will need to be cleaned up during installation of the new tires on the rim (when the time comes). That will be the time when whomever is installing the tires will utter a few unkind words about the person who had used tire sealant. ;-)



Tire sealant is designed to work itself into the area of the tire that is leaking air, and clog it.
The foam will be a minor barrier to the tire sealant doing its job. Since air is leaking past the foam, so will the sealant, and it will still seal the cut as long as it's not too large.

The bigger problem may come from uneven absorption of sealant into the foam around the circumference of the tire. That may compromise the balance of the tire, and introduce vibrations. Since you want to get the wheel to a competent tire shop to properly patch the tire anyway, it will be only a temporary problem.

HTH,
a
Thanks but was already at the SC for another issue. They gave me a new tire at no cost, so worked out fine.
 
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This past weekend when I had a flat in my 2-week-old MYP, I pumped up the tire with the compressor of the repair kit that came with the vehicle, and it worked great. I couldn't get the pump to work when the dial was on the sealant setting. I DO NOT like Big O tires, but they were the only place in the town that I was visiting that was open. They said that run flat tires with the sound reducing foam could not be patched. I was able to get home after pumping the tire with air, went to my wonderful local Discount Tire store, and they repaired the tire saying that they just pull up the foam patch the tire and reattach the foam. Plus, they did not charge for the repair even though the tires are the original OEM equipment.
 

stopcrazypp

Well-Known Member
Dec 8, 2007
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This past weekend when I had a flat in my 2-week-old MYP, I pumped up the tire with the compressor of the repair kit that came with the vehicle, and it worked great. I couldn't get the pump to work when the dial was on the sealant setting. I DO NOT like Big O tires, but they were the only place in the town that I was visiting that was open. They said that run flat tires with the sound reducing foam could not be patched. I was able to get home after pumping the tire with air, went to my wonderful local Discount Tire store, and they repaired the tire saying that they just pull up the foam patch the tire and reattach the foam. Plus, they did not charge for the repair even though the tires are the original OEM equipment.
Well they are right run flat tires can't be patched, but these aren't run flat tires. And as you found out, foam tires can be patched no problem, just remove the foam and reattach it (some don't even put it back, they just cut out the portion).
 
Incorrect, runflat tires can typically be patched. Runflats have stiffer sidewalls to support vehicle load if the tire has no air pressure. Any damage to the central part of the tread can be patched just like normal tires. Damage to outer shoulders or sidewalls of any tires shouldn't be patched and a new tire should be installed.


Foam lined tires can also be repaired
 
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stopcrazypp

Well-Known Member
Dec 8, 2007
12,176
8,026
Incorrect, runflat tires can typically be patched. Runflats have stiffer sidewalls to support vehicle load if the tire has no air pressure. Any damage to the central part of the tread can be patched just like normal tires. Damage to outer shoulders or sidewalls of any tires shouldn't be patched and a new tire should be installed.


Foam lined tires can also be repaired
I stand corrected then, I looked previously at Continental and Pirelli's (which do not allow fixing run flats) policies in another thread and presumed that it would apply to all brands, but from your list, it looks like there are many brands that do allow it.
 
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