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Tires seem to require very frequent air addition?

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oh BTW...adding air to tires that have been " driven on"/warm tires...they will soon deflate to a lower PSI...try to add air when the tires are colder....if you HAVE TO add when you have hot or warm tires...inflate them about 3 PSI than you normally would so that as they come down, it will be closer to where you want the number to be.
 
Tire wear with negative camber...better to keep it puffed up
That's not how it works. The higher the pressure in the tire the smaller the contact patch, and the more wear put on a smaller portion of the tire. Your tire will wear faster with high camber at higher pressures.

But none of that explains why you need to keep a closer eye on your pressures than a non-lowered car, especially with TPMS.
 
Only advantage is nitrogen is thicker than air so you can go a little longer between topoff having less escape through the rubber. As mentioned, the Nitrogen percentage is not all that much compared to regular air so the benefits are rather miniscule. Huge marketing hype is all it is/was.

Got a good laugh out of this one. Top 10 Reasons Nitrogen Filled Tyres Are a Scam — Auto Expert by John Cadogan - save thousands on your next new car!

The only thing positive I can say about a nitrogen fill is that it is "dry" gas. You don't get the moisture you get from air. But if you have a good compressor, they can take out most of the moisture. I never worry about it. It takes maybe 7-10 minutes to top them off once every couple months.

Mike
 
The only thing positive I can say about a nitrogen fill is that it is "dry" gas. You don't get the moisture you get from air. But if you have a good compressor, they can take out most of the moisture. I never worry about it. It takes maybe 7-10 minutes to top them off once every couple months.

Mike
cool..good to know...learn more and more everyday...you guys ROCK!!!
 
Just posting here to see if any one else is encountering this weird phenomenon.

Wife bought a 2021 Model 3 Performance in August 2021. Since then we've only put 3,000 miles on the odometer with mostly freeway driving and errands (aka no track days). Stock uberturbines and tires. I'm in Northern California and the car is parked in a garage. So maybe it's gotten down to 40F but this thing has never seen snow.

The tire pressure keeps dropping from the factory 42 psi down to 36 psi every 1,500 miles. And it's every tire coming down in pressure at the same rate. All 4 basically went down to 36 psi a few months, and the TPMS warning (orange indicator) popped on. I got a Milwaukee 12v digital air compressor and roadside patch kit since the Model 3 doesn't have a spare. I've already used it to refill all 4 tires from 36 to 42 psi, and now I had to do it again.

I've owned a bunch of cars leading up to this, and I've never seen this. IIRC back in the 90s, there was a push by stealerships to put nitrogen into tires to help keep this from happening, but that was a load of baloney. Regular atmospheric air shouldn't be leaking this fast.

Is this normal for all of you with Model 3 Performance? Like you just gotta keep topping these tires up?
I have the same issue and have to refill tires every few months.
 
1500 miles? In a Tesla with42PSI tire pressures? Perfectly normal.

My wife has an S and I now have a model 3 Perf - that seems normal to the point of abnormal in that the highrer pressures in the tires should leak down faster than that. Most vehicles are betw 32 & 36psi with 33 being more or less average. Given that sea level pressure is 15psi - the difference between 15 and 33 is 2.2 whilst 42 and 15 is 2.8 - so there is 28% more air pressure trying to get out -
 

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