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Today’s FUD Missle From the Koch Bros

Discussion in 'Tesla, Inc.' started by omarsultan, Aug 6, 2017.

  1. omarsultan

    omarsultan Active Member

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    • Funny x 5
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  2. ecarfan

    ecarfan Well-Known Member

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  3. GoTslaGo

    GoTslaGo Learning Member

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    Innovation and clever thinking:

     
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  4. TaoJones

    TaoJones Beyond Driven

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    What a collective load. the WSJ really has gone downhill.

    In no particular order:

    CA will have approximately 40% of the continent's EVs. Solve CA and you solve North America at the very least.

    CA gets $1.2B from the Dieselgate settlement in $200M chunks every 20 months. Since few can conceptualize $1.2B, here's a way to think about that - it would buy approximately 4000 SC locations. Now realize that there are just 400 SC locations in North America today. Not that penny one of that money will go to Tesla's SCs, but the point remains.

    CA's 2 largest utilities have committed to 12,500 L2 & L3 chargers statewide.

    Now the handwringing - what about all those Model 3s?!

    Yeah, well, about that... If 60% of the first 2 years' production is for North America and 40% of that for CA, and if we call that production 300,000 cars, back of the napkin math puts 72,000 Model 3s in CA over 2 years, for an annualized 36,000 additional cars per year.

    Given the above, along with the fact that 70% of the houses in the US have garages, and there's not a lot of reason to be concerned about the sky falling. As usual. And that doesn't even consider public/private partnerships, such as CalTech's 50 L2 chargers that went live recently, nor proactive buildouts (see latest Costco in LA County with 16 L2 chargers).

    More interesting charging solutions have been tested in the UK and elsewhere - embedded inductive charging in roadways. Probably not practical for Teslas, but every bit helps.

    There will be tougher choices over time. As much as I prefer driving now as a means from long distance point A to point B, it would be difficult to not at least consider, for example, Hyperloop tunneling from Los Angeles to New York. Doesn't have to be 700mph. Even at half that speed, it means I could descend via elevator after dinner in Santa Monica and wake up in Manhattan in time for an early morning workout/shower at the gym followed by breakfast and a full work day. All with my own car at my disposal thereafter. Not that anybody drives in Manhattan.

    You're welcome, WSJ and Forbes. Try harder next time.
     
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  5. larmor

    larmor Active Member

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    Clearly all the cars will charge at all the cell phone, laptop and iPad charging stations, available at convenient 100 meter intervals...
     
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  6. Webeevdrivers

    Webeevdrivers Member

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    Yep. And that's a story from 2016. Wonder what the numbers are now. I know Vancouver closed their last down town station in June. We haven't gone to a gas station in two years...we'll actually there is one along our route that has one of those espresso machines so....
     
  7. commasign

    commasign Active Member

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    That's like saying people shouldn't exercise because there won't be enough gyms to accommodate everyone.
     
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  8. EVie'sDad

    EVie'sDad Member

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  9. mspohr

    mspohr Active Member

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    WSJ has always been fake news. I've been reading it for 50 years.
    Murdoch may have "Foxified" it but it's always been very biased.
     
  10. Reciprocity

    Reciprocity Active Member

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    If Tesla does not build enough chargers, Utilities will because they would be very profitable. An EV can consume as much electricity as an entire house if say its an Uber driver or someone with a very long commute. This is very appealing for Utilities because its more customers and they can incentive charging to help smooth out the supply/demand curve and help them better manage their resources. My hope is that Tesla corners the market on this and builds out Microgrids similar to what they created for Kauai for power generation as close to the chargers as possible. This would allow Tesla to become a utility themselves and supply superchargers at 4-5c/KWh and sell it to anyone who wants it for 15-20c depending on the retail rates for that area. This would be massively profitable.
     
  11. Lloyd

    Lloyd Well-Known Member

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    They said the same thing about gas stations when Gasoline automobiles were first introduced!
     
  12. chateauoaks

    chateauoaks Member

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    Ok, someone please explain this to me.

    The Wall Street Journal constantly throws shade on Tesla. The Wall Street Journal is owned by Murdock Media. James Murdock is Rupert Murdock's son. James Murdock is now CEO of Fox News. The same James Murdock is the newest member of Tesla's Board of Directors.

    WTF???
     
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  13. BrianF

    BrianF New Member

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    I was wondering that myself... My theory is- Maybe it's a strategic move by Tesla to get him invested in the success of Tesla/EVs, thereby causing him to go back to his editorial board and tell them to change their tune?

    (I have no idea if that would work, but it might be worth a shot, as by some accounts, James is at least slightly less crazy than his father)
     
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  14. EarlyAdopter

    EarlyAdopter Active Member

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    James Murdoch is by all accounts is a very different person than his father. His brother is as well. Also, James' wife, Kathyrn Murdoch, is on the board of the Environmental Defense Fund and an activist for many progressive causes. Their views may be shaping some of changes you're seeing at Fox News and perhaps the WSJ as well. Different generation, different values. Or really, just bringing back conservation as a conservative cause, which it was back in the 50's and 60's.
     
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  15. N5329K

    N5329K Member

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    #15 N5329K, Aug 9, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2017
    Actually, there were no gas stations at all. Gasoline was considered a waste product from refining "rock oil" for lamps (oil producers usually just poured it into the nearest river). If you had a horseless carriage you clattered over to the local hay and feed, bought a sealed tin of gasoline and poured your own. Somehow the market solved that problem.
    I wonder if the WSJ counted electrical outlets in their "no chargers to be found" story?
    Robin
     
  16. andrew.hollo

    andrew.hollo New Member

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    I don't see this as that clever . . . sure, supercharging is 21st century technology, but why attach it to a 20th century technology like parking meters? Where I live, they are being removed and all parking is paid for via phone apps.

    Andrew
     
  17. GoTslaGo

    GoTslaGo Learning Member

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    IIRC, in the video he attached them to lamp posts. And had it connect wirelessly to whomever connects to charge. Can't recall the exact details, but some system where charging can use existing infrastructure to maximize access would be the easiest to adopt.

    Parking meters may allow municipalities a direct way of charging for charging, which could encourage them to expand charging options for everyone--for better or worse. But the video showed a really simple solution using the lamp posts (IIRC).
     
  18. voip-ninja

    voip-ninja Member

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    Few can conceptualize 1.2B? It's 1,200 million. Remedial math that a 3rd grader should easily grasp.

    As far as the "charging density" issue. The thing that will be harder to solve is how to get charging to all the people who don't own their own home. Solutions have been proposed but nothing seems to be poised to meet that need. Realizing you are low for charge as you leave for work from your apartment and then needing to stop for 15-30 minutes to charge the car up to do your commute seems like a non starter to me.... but we'll see what the market comes up with to solve the problem.
     
  19. mspohr

    mspohr Active Member

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    They live in an apartment with no electricity?
    (I can't conceptualize $1.2 billion.)
     
  20. John5396

    John5396 Member

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    The thing that stories like this miss are that EV owners are self selected. No one is going to buy without a charging solution.

    So what that there are apartment dwellers who don't have access to charging for the next 5 years. There are plenty of potential customers who do have home charging in reasonable reach, and they will be the people who by the EVs for the next X years.

    Yes, then end game perhaps 20-30 years from now is end of the ICE, and charging for city dwellers without dedicated parking and apartment dwellers will need to be solved. Perhaps that is the most important use case for FSD, car takes itself to the superchager in the middle of the night, then returns home to be ready for the owner to use in the AM.

    But that doesn't mean much of anything for the demand for EV's over the next 2-3 years.
     

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