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What do I need to know before installing NEMA 14-50 outlet condo parking structure?

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by kazaam, Nov 29, 2014.

  1. kazaam

    kazaam New Member

    Nov 29, 2014
    Anaheim, CA
    Hi everyone,

    I just bought an inventory S60 in Orange County, and very happy about the purchase :)

    My condo complex has a few ChargePoint stations, but the price seems very high, $0.49/kWh for visitors, and $0.29/kWh for residence. I'm residence so I'm able to get the $0.29 rate for the first 5 hours, and $5.00/hour after that.

    I'm looking into installing a 240v NEMA 14-50 outlet at my parking spot in the structure, about 30' from my house in the same level (ground floor). Before calling an electrician, I would like to know what does the process involve, so that I don't look like an idiot when dealing with electrician and get sky-high quotes.

    Since it is a condo, I think the electrician needs to draw up a plan on paper showing the location of the outlet and how the wire has to run, and submit those for the HOA and the city to get permit, before actually installing? I probably need a breaker for that outlet, but do I need a separate meter for it? Should I call Southern California Edison for advice at all?

    Anyone has a good recommendation for reasonable priced electrician in Orange County?

    Thank you for all inputs :)
    Happy Thanksgiving. I'm thankful for my new Tesla S :)
  2. KJD

    KJD Member

    Dec 14, 2013
    SLC, UT
  3. dhrivnak

    dhrivnak Active Member

    Jan 8, 2011
    NE Tennessee
    Ah the advantages of living in TN. We would check to make sure there is an open slot for the 50 amp breaker and then just run the circuit. No permits, permissions or other foolishness. I would use conduit underground. The breaker at the pole is nice but optional here.
  4. ModelS1079

    ModelS1079 Member

    Jun 23, 2012
    Suburban Boston
    I have a NEMA 14-50 in a garage in one location, outside in another. The outdoor one has a rubber sealed cover and can be locked; that seems a good idea.
  5. roblab

    roblab Active Member

    Jul 15, 2008
    Angwin (Napa Valley) CA
    Seems like every state I've been in, the RV parks all have the same 14-50 outlet setup. There's a 14-50 outlet, and a 110 volt outlet, and a circuit breaker. This resides in a box with a flop down lid that keeps the rain off. No locks. Some places have a meter at each space, most do not. If anyone really wants to keep track, your car will display kWh used. Generally the price of electricity is so low that it is a non issue; maybe $1-$3 for daily top up while gas car thinking would guess it should cost $10-$20.

    I can't see the benefit of locks. Most everyone knows what outlets are, and if not, they learn pretty quickly. Gas caps weren't locked until the 70s when everyone was afraid someone would steal your gas. My only problem with locks is that when you want to use your item, you can't find the key, or can't remember the password, or, as in the case with gated communities, it's just the hassle of punching in the numbers, getting one wrong, starting over, etc. I don't go visit those people any more. They are probably glad.

    Good luck on getting your outlet in with few hassles. Make sure to give your HOA group rides and drives.

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