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You can override acceleration during autopilot!

ecarfan

Well-Known Member
Sep 21, 2013
19,396
14,407
West Vancouver, British Columbia
Yes, I use that technique often when I signal to initiate an Auto Lane Change and I want the car to speed up a bit before the change, or when the car slows down for a curve more than I think is necessary. Note that if you try to increase speed through a curve too much while on Auto Pilot it could disengage which might be a problem if you don’t have at least one hand on the steering wheel; which I always do.
 

derotam

Member
Oct 31, 2018
849
795
Oak Hill, VA
It can also be helpful when wanting to do any hypermiling....allows the car to still steer itself while you can concentrate more on accelerator regulation for coasting down hills.

Edit, as mentioned in future posts and as a disclaimer...You will get a nag about AP not braking because you are overriding TACC. Also, if you end up in violation of the set TACC distance and you let off the accelerator, it will AGGRESSIVELY "brake" to get into compliance with the TACC distance setting.
 
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discoM3

Member
Aug 7, 2019
30
11
UK
The time it worked when i didn't expect it was from a standstill.

The car in front got away and there was a large gap opening, i could accelerate quite hard and it handled the steering all the way.
 

kavyboy

Active Member
Jan 13, 2016
1,296
2,276
Spring, TX
At least on the model S, and I assume the 3 is the same:
1) Using the accelerator will bring up an immediate nag. No big deal, just expect it.
2) It puts an alert up on screen. It's the same visual that is used for "something is wrong", so again, just expect it.

The warning is telling you that the car won't keep it's distance from the car ahead since you're overriding its distance-keeping, and you may hit the car ahead. It's a good reminder, in my opinion.
 
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boiler81

Member
Feb 22, 2016
761
688
Manson, WA
Yeah, but don't accelerate too much or it will put you in "Autopilot Jail".
Granted I haven't tried it in recent updates, but previously if you were in Autopilot and accelerated greater than 20mph over, (passing situation, etc.), it kicks you out with highest warning and won't re-engage until stopped.
 

justsomeguy

Member
Jul 4, 2019
295
292
Vancouver, Bc
Yeah, but don't accelerate too much or it will put you in "Autopilot Jail".
Granted I haven't tried it in recent updates, but previously if you were in Autopilot and accelerated greater than 20mph over, (passing situation, etc.), it kicks you out with highest warning and won't re-engage until stopped.
I think this happens when you hit the upper autopilot speed threshold (150km/h or 95? mph)
 

ecarfan

Well-Known Member
Sep 21, 2013
19,396
14,407
West Vancouver, British Columbia
At least on the model S, and I assume the 3 is the same:
1) Using the accelerator will bring up an immediate nag. No big deal, just expect it.
2) It puts an alert up on screen. It's the same visual that is used for "something is wrong", so again, just expect it.
My Model 3 does not work the way you describe your S works. No “immediate nag” or onscreen alert if my added acceleration is modest.
 
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Need

Active Member
Nov 22, 2017
2,989
2,305
Rancho Cucamonga
The time it worked when i didn't expect it was from a standstill.

The car in front got away and there was a large gap opening, i could accelerate quite hard and it handled the steering all the way.

Stop and go traffic is when I use this feature the most. I can tell when the car in front will start moving by looking at all the cars in front of him. AP will only start to move the car when the car in front actually started moving. So usually I just give it a light tap on the paddle to start the process.
 

t-rizzle

Member
May 8, 2019
106
35
Colorado
I think this happens when you hit the upper autopilot speed threshold (150km/h or 95? mph)
85 MPH unless they up'd it. Don't try it though on a commute and you want AP in use because it wont even allow TACC to work until you stop and park then 'reset' it so to speak. I was passing a few months ago and hit 87 and it disengaged and said AP unavailable rest of the drive or something. It sucked but my fault for forgetting to disengage before passing and accelerating. I make sure to disengage via the stock then accelerate and pass and reengage now.
 

eladts

Member
Jul 31, 2016
836
1,187
Brookline, MA
It can also be helpful when wanting to do any hypermiling....allows the car to still steer itself while you can concentrate more on accelerator regulation for coasting down hills.

Edit, as mentioned in future posts and as a disclaimer...You will get a nag about AP not braking because you are overriding TACC. Also, if you end up in violation of the set TACC distance and you let off the accelerator, it will AGGRESSIVELY "brake" to get into compliance with the TACC distance setting.

I don't think you can be more efficient than TACC if you keep the set speed limit and distance. Since you can change both parameters, why bother trying?
 

justsomeguy

Member
Jul 4, 2019
295
292
Vancouver, Bc
85 MPH unless they up'd it. Don't try it though on a commute and you want AP in use because it wont even allow TACC to work until you stop and park then 'reset' it so to speak. I was passing a few months ago and hit 87 and it disengaged and said AP unavailable rest of the drive or something. It sucked but my fault for forgetting to disengage before passing and accelerating. I make sure to disengage via the stock then accelerate and pass and reengage now.
Thanks for clarifying, I just converted 150km/h to mph and rounded :D
 

derotam

Member
Oct 31, 2018
849
795
Oak Hill, VA
I don't think you can be more efficient than TACC if you keep the set speed limit and distance. Since you can change both parameters, why bother trying?

TACC is not designed to be "efficient" nor does TACC "maintain a set speed" technically.

The Traffic Aware part is not designed for efficiency, it is designed to adapt to the car in front at a set distance. If the car in front is slowing below your set speed, and then speeding back up, TACC will do the same.

The Cruise Control part also is not designed to be "efficient" per se if you want to allow for some slop in your speed to make little efficiency gains throughout your drive.. Maintaining a set speed is wasteful precisely because it maintains the set speed so precisely. When you go down a hill where gravity will cause your car to go faster cruise control wastes the energy conversion loss. If you allow your car to go faster than your set speed and then let it lose it "naturally" on the uphill you are being more efficient.
 
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Pkmmte

Le meow
Sep 19, 2017
694
1,235
Los Angeles, California
I use this feature all the time since it refuses to go at the same speed as everyone else on main roads.

Autopilot won't go faster than 5 mph past the speed limit, while everyone else is going at least 15 mph faster so I basically have to leave my foot on the accelerator the entire time.
 
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