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110V for short commute?

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by BBB4000, Oct 27, 2016.

  1. BBB4000

    BBB4000 Member

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    I drive less than 15 miles on average per day. Would people advise against using a standard 110V outlet to charge a MS 60D overnight? I thought I read a 110V outlet charges 3 miles/hour - which would suffice for overnight charging. Any thoughts on this? Is it a bad idea? Obviously if I took a longer trip one day a night charge won't be enough but I am contemplating day-to-day commutes only right now.
     
  2. kort677

    kort677 Active Member

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    if that is all that you drive you could get away with using a 110 line to power up the car. at 110v used with a 12g wire you'll put about 4 miles per hour into the car. assuming that you'll have 10 hours per night to recharge you'll have plenty of charge to use the next day.
     
  3. BBB4000

    BBB4000 Member

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    This is probably a question for the DS but do I need any converter or adapter to plug the charging cable into a 110V outlet? Does the car come with a 12g wire?
     
  4. benjiejr

    benjiejr Technogeekextraordinaire

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    The car comes with the charging cable and the 110v adapter so you don't need to buy anything extra.
     
  5. Xenius

    Xenius Member

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    Car comes with everything you need.

    110v Will be fine for you for now. You'd really rather have the 220v eventually though. Charging at 29 miles per hour gives a lot more flexibility.
     
  6. MorrisonHiker

    MorrisonHiker S 90D 2017.28 c528869

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    The UMC included with the car also comes with a 5-15 adapter for regular household outlets. You might check and see if you have 5-20 outlets as many garages have those. They would let you charge slightly faster at about 5 mph if you by the $45 adapter.
     
  7. MoonChou

    MoonChou Member

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    I live in MN (so I get hit by the range loss in the winter) and I commute a total of 57 miles Mon-Sat. I use a 110v outlet with an addition of 4 miles an hour which is not enough to fully recharge what I used during the day. Fortunately there's a super charger near me at a Hyvee and I charge there to 90% battery capacity while I do some grocery shopping.
     
  8. BBB4000

    BBB4000 Member

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    The 220V is coming in a little while :) I just need to make sure the 110V can hold me over for a few months and it sounds like it will.
     
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  9. kort677

    kort677 Active Member

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    the car comes with a converter, if the wire from the UMC is long enough to reach your car you won't need a 12g extension cord. however if you are going to depend on 110 charging it would be wise to go buy an extension wire.
     
  10. BBB4000

    BBB4000 Member

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    why would I need an extension cord if the cord that comes with the car is long enough? Am I missing something?
     
  11. Xenius

    Xenius Member

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    Absolutely, you'll be fine!
     
  12. kort677

    kort677 Active Member

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    if the cord IS NOT long enough.
     
  13. gavine

    gavine Petrol Head turned EV Enthusiast

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    I lived with 110v on my i3 for about 3 months. It worked-out but having the 240v now is so much nicer. Also, keep in mind that 240v charging is much more efficient. If you have high electricity rates, it could make a difference.
     
  14. BBB4000

    BBB4000 Member

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    good tip. This charging setup with the 110V is only for a short period of time. I will be switching to 220V a few months after delivery.
     
  15. Rocky_H

    Rocky_H Active Member

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    You can call this being overly sensitive if you want, but constantly seeing 110 and 220 gets on my nerves. Those were done away with about 50 years ago. Residential electricity in the United States has used 120V and 240V for decades.
     
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  16. BBB4000

    BBB4000 Member

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    Good to know. What leads to confusion is the number of online resources that still state 110V in the US.
     
  17. Hotlobstah

    Hotlobstah Member

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    Also, in the interim you'll probably find level 2 chargers(and probably free) in your area to plug into. You can find them on the Plugshare app. I was surprised at how many there are...and I'm the only one using them.
     
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  18. Chopr147

    Chopr147 Active Member

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    I keep saying 240V and was "corrected" more than once that it is 220V. I have had this disagreement 3-4 times in the last 2 months :)

    I was going to ask why 120V? But you answered it. Actually at my vacation home I got by with the 120V charging for a couple weeks until I had time to put in the 14-50 plug. But yea, 12 hours of charging and I was only at like 50% charge, had to use a Supercharger to get home 150 miles away :(
     
  19. Rocky_H

    Rocky_H Active Member

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    An electrician friend of mine who explained this to me did mention some of the reason why there is still some of this confusion. Besides just carryover terminology, here's the other thing that happens. It's 120/240V at the panel. Then, you put on a breaker and run a long section of wire through a house for 50, 70, or 100 feet to an outlet to an appliance. So by the time you have maybe a slightly low supply from the power company (could be 238 instead of 240), plus a few junctions, plus the house wiring length voltage drop, the appliances are probably only getting a little over 110/220 for stuff that's far away from the panel. So if people measure something at an outlet and see 114, it probably gets reinforced in their minds as more like 110 than 120.
     
  20. f-stop

    f-stop Member

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    if your daily mileage is low, you can absolutely get by with a nightly charge on a standard 110V (ok, 120V !) outlet. The UMC cable that comes with the car is all you need to plug in, assuming your outlet is withing 18ft of the car's charge port (right rear).

    I don't have a daily commute and so I don't drive many miles/day around town - I've been using 120V outlet to charge my Model S for almost a year without any headache. Yes it's slow -- the car charges at the very slow rate of about +6 rated km per hour of charge (so about 3-4mph). A typical L2 public charger or 240V circuit will charge about 5x that speed. So obviously 240V is much more convenient and efficient overall, but 120V will work for low mileage
     

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