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BGE in Maryland

Discussion in 'Energy, Environment, and Policy' started by mczajka, Aug 10, 2016.

  1. mczajka

    mczajka Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2011
    Messages:
    160
    Location:
    Waldorf, MD
    In another thread, there was inquiry about BGE.

    From @Masti

    I need some support from Tesla owners. Before i purchased the car, i had called BGE (electric provider) to inquire about the rates for charging at home. They told me about off peek and on peek rates. well today, after i signed-up and registered my car, i call them to make sure everything is in there system and i am on that plan where i pay 0.07/kw on off peek vs 09 on peek. I know the numbers are not that off so the saving is not huge, but, it turns out i am not on that plan. she mentioned, there is a no incentive to sign up for that plan b\c the blended rate i currently have is 0.9/kw and if i had "pay for time of use" plan it would be 0.07/kw for off peek and 0.12/kw for on peek( higher than what i currently pay) - which makes no sense. This would indicated that buying electric car is a mistake from BGE point of view. Right?

    My question to all the MD residents is - what is your current setup with BGE (if you have them) and weather or not the information i got was correct or a straight by lie (i think its a lie and ill call back in few hrs)?

    Since I have a contact, I asked him to provide a response, and he provided this...

    BGE offers a rate specifically for EV owners who want to charge their plug-in vehicles at home. The rate is designed so that a typical residential customer would see a very similar bill amount on either the standard flat rate or the EV rate before shifting use to off peak hours. The rates are designed with lower rates in off-peak hours to encourage customers to charge their cars in off-peak hours. The on-peak hours are higher than standard or flat rates, but, under a typical or average residential use pattern, with the mix of on-peak and off-peak hours and rates, the bills would come out to similar amounts. The EV rate offers extended periods of lower rates, 12 to 14 hours on a weekday, and all hours on weekends and national holidays, so the EV owner can charge their car at the lower rates. And, if any other house use (like laundry, dishwashing) can be shifted to off-peak hours, it would come under the lower rate as well.

    My team would be happy to answer any specific questions and, if there is enough information available look at your particular situation and do a rate comparison. Please feel free to contact us at [email protected].

    John Murach
    BGE

    More EV Rate details are below…

    The EV Rate includes:
    • A voluntary Time-of-Use (TOU) Electric Vehicle Rate for residential customers that offers a lower rate during Non-Peak periods.
    • An EV Rate applied to the whole house using a Smart Meter (AMI) or TOU Meter that measures interval energy usage data. Customers with a net meter for customer generation of renewable energy are not eligible.
    • BGE as your Energy Choice Supplier and the EV Rate is based on the Standard Offer Service for Summer and Non-Summer rates that may change during the year.
    More information on rates is on the BGE web site, click on link to view Electric Service Rates and Tariffs or from BGE.com main menu select Smart Energy, then Plug-in Electric Vehicles, then Charging Your PEV to find the link “go to Rates & Tariffs” for Electric Service Rates and Tariffs page. Once on the page, scroll down to click links for “Residential Electric Vehicle Time-of-Use - Schedule EV” and in Riders section “Rider 1 - Standard Offer Service” to view the documents.

    The EV Rate Price Plan has a Delivery Service Charge - $7.90/month (same as Schedule R rate) and cost per kilowatt hour during Peak and Non-Peak periods:

    [​IMG]

    Summer

    Peak - Between hours 10 am and 8 pm on weekdays, excluding the National holidays listed below.
    Non-Peak - All times other than those defined for the Peak rating period.

    Non-Summer

    Peak - Between hours 7 am and 11 am, and hours 5 pm and 9 pm on weekdays, excluding the National holidays listed below.
    Non-Peak - All times other than those defined for the Peak rating period.

    Non-Summer time periods shown above will begin and end one hour later for the period between the second Sunday in March and the first Sunday in April, and for the period between the last Sunday in October and the first Sunday in November.

    All hours on Saturdays and Sundays and the following National holidays are Non-Peak: New Year's Day, President's Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and the Monday following such of these as fall on Sunday.
     
  2. bro1999

    bro1999 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2016
    Messages:
    405
    Location:
    Maryland
    I ran the math a couple of years ago. The EV rate plan *might* work if you live alone or your house is empty most of the day. Otherwise, it is simply too much of a hassle to actually save any kind of significant money. Plus you can't sign up with 3rd party suppliers if you choose the EV rate plan...you are stuck with BGE pricing.

    Basically, just find the cheapest 3rd party electricity supplier with a fixed rate plan. Guaranteed savings over the BGE rate plans without planning electricity usage for off-peak hours.
     

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