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Caution Model X, Hidden Tire Wear

Josephponline

Member
Mar 18, 2019
8
4
Colorado
I really do not understand how there can be so much variation in tire wear, on cars with pretty much fixed alignment values, assuming no accident damage, and similar driving habits. I would love to have the alignment values that Josephponline posted but not sure I am ready to invest in the modifications to achieve them.

Based on my first set of OEM tires, now replaced by a second set of OEM tires, I am not expecting to get much over 25k miles on the rears, outside tread will be fine at that point, inside will be down to steel cord, all with alignment in spec. I suspect the culprit is the non adjustable rear camber, which by definition is the same on all since it is fixed, yet some get twice the mileage on their tires. I would sacrifice some reduction in handling in order to have more even tire wear but don't think I can get there without adjustable links. I guess I either pay the price in more frequent tire replacement or in the purchase of adjustable links, but still does not answer the question of why are some vehicles not experiencing this.
I think there are two variables contributing to the different experiences. 1. Alignment ex: factory which will be in an acceptable range, but not necessarily fixed. 2. Driving behaviors. If I drove in standard all the time I think my inner rear tire wear would have been much less pronounced. Because I’m generally always on freeways over 65mph, and the car defaulting to low, I don’t think my rear tires stood a chance.
 

ngng

Member
Jul 23, 2018
779
324
Bay Area
I think there are two variables contributing to the different experiences. 1. Alignment ex: factory which will be in an acceptable range, but not necessarily fixed. 2. Driving behaviors. If I drove in standard all the time I think my inner rear tire wear would have been much less pronounced. Because I’m generally always on freeways over 65mph, and the car defaulting to low, I don’t think my rear tires stood a chance.

So this is also an interesting point. Does anybody know what mode the car is aligned in? A car that is dialed in for standard, but is driven in very low or low is going to have substantially different alignment values.
 
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Dispersion

Member
Aug 30, 2020
5
1
California
On another thread talking about the front axles breaking on the MX and another member posted this video (
) which is pretty recent - April 2021. The tech explains much of what's being discussed on this thread in the first 5 mins. I found it to be pretty helpful. Not sure how good the product offered in the video is (looks like it's brand new) but will be interesting to follow or hear from folks who have installed them.
 
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Steinmetz

Maker of Lightning
Sep 25, 2019
85
36
Penngrove California
So this is also an interesting point. Does anybody know what mode the car is aligned in? A car that is dialed in for standard, but is driven in very low or low is going to have substantially different alignment values.
Not sure it will make much difference since neither rear toe, or rear camber is adjustable unless you have replaced factory links with aftermarket adjustable links.
 

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