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First 2022 VINs (and changes) discussion / Thread

jebinc

EndlessVibrating PLAID, cream/FSD; MYP, wht on wht
Supporting Member
Jun 19, 2019
8,579
12,719
Seattle area
Hello all,

It has been said that Tesla starts transitioning to the next model year in September. Currently, Model Y year code is "M" for 2021 9
10th digit of VIN). 2022s will have an "N" in the 10th position. As we all wait and get our LR/Performance VINs in the coming month, please post here if you received a 2022 "N" VIN in September-December, and when you take delivery, what is different from the 2021 "M" coded cars? For example, does the 2022 "N" MY have the updated door trim, like the Model 3 does? Post any and all on "N" VINs here!
 

MY1stEV

Member
Jul 29, 2021
204
308
Atlanta suburbs
Having been conditioned by the traditional car makers to expect the launch of a new model year as when the big changes happen, I can understand how people might have that same expectation with Tesla. Tesla, however, does not do things like the other car manufacturers.

Let me use 2021 to illustrate. The 2021 model year of the Model Y started out with a 77kWh battery, but around February the battery pack increased to 82 kWH. I also think it was around this time that they changed the center console and upgraded the headlights on the Performance Model Y. Somewhere around here I think they also added the heated steering wheel too. In May they removed radar from ADAS and removed lumbar support in the passenger seat. In July they added HEPA "bio-weapon defense mode" to the HVAC. They also added a 7 passenger version of the Model Y this summer. All of these happened *within* a model year.

So don't dwell on what might change with the first 2022 Model Y's to roll off the assembly line. They might not be that different from the last 2021's to roll off the assembly line. There are going to be multiple changes that will happen over the model year, but they don't all happen at one time.

There is already a video on YouTube of what the reviewer claims is a 2022 Model Y in Germany that was built in China. This car has the new wrap around trim on the door panels and the upgraded projector headlights even tho it is not a Performance model. No mention on whether or not this car has the front casting or structural battery pack. We know for certain it doesn't have the 4680 cells.
 
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Undisclosed

Member
Jan 30, 2020
440
375
USA
There is already a video on YouTube of what the reviewer claims is a 2022 Model Y in Germany that was built in China. This car has the new wrap around trim on the door panels and the upgraded projector headlights even tho it is not a Performance model. No mention on whether or not this car has the front casting or structural battery pack. We know for certain it doesn't have the 4680 cells.

I think those Model Y were made in China which already had those features when the Model Y was first introduced in Feb?
 
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jebinc

EndlessVibrating PLAID, cream/FSD; MYP, wht on wht
Supporting Member
Jun 19, 2019
8,579
12,719
Seattle area
My 2021 LR Y was delivered in October 2020. I thought I remember the SA say they switched to 21 in October. Maybe my new one will be a 2022 would be cool but i don’t care much. Should be taking delivery by EOM.
Same. I have an EDD range ending 9/30. I hope that slips to October, for resale value purposes.
 

Starway2001

MYP | Red/White | OD 8/20 | VIN #318 11/24
Jul 22, 2021
407
759
West Coast
Yes, but Tesla doesn't really use the old-school "new model with a new year" cycles. They update their car whenever they want/convenient. We need to think of these cars as Model Y 1.0 and Model Y 2.0. No one's getting a 2.0 car the first week or two in October. AT MOST they might be getting single-piece front castings. But even that won't constitute a 2.0 car. Only when they switch to 4680 battery/chassis will it be a 2.0 car. That most likely won't happen until early next year.

Unless you want simply want to see 2022 printed on your registration. Because that's really all that's changing at first.
 

jebinc

EndlessVibrating PLAID, cream/FSD; MYP, wht on wht
Supporting Member
Jun 19, 2019
8,579
12,719
Seattle area
Yes, but Tesla doesn't really use the old-school "new model with a new year" cycles. They update their car whenever they want/convenient. We need to think of these cars as Model Y 1.0 and Model Y 2.0. No one's getting a 2.0 car the first week or two in October. AT MOST they might be getting single-piece front castings. But even that won't constitute a 2.0 car. Only when they switch to 4680 battery/chassis will it be a 2.0 car. That most likely won't happen until early next year.

Unless you want simply want to see 2022 printed on your registration. Because that's really all that's changing at first.
No, I want the increased RESALE VALUE, that the 2022 VIN printed on my title would bring (vs. a “2021” printed on the title)….
 

Starway2001

MYP | Red/White | OD 8/20 | VIN #318 11/24
Jul 22, 2021
407
759
West Coast
No, I want the increased RESALE VALUE, that the 2022 VIN printed on my title would bring (vs. a “2021” printed on the title)….
Carvana offered me significantly more for my 2014 Audi S5 over my 2015 S5 (yes I owned two, long story, don't ask) because of the mileage. The 2014 had 10k fewer miles on it than the 2015 one. Also, the 2015 car had some scratches and rock chips compared to the 2014. IMO, mileage and maintenance was the bigger factor between the two offers. Look, I could be wrong as this is only one personal example that happened very recently and could be influenced by the insanity of the used-car market, but I did find it interesting nonetheless.
 

PNWLeccy

Active Member
Jul 11, 2019
1,490
1,352
Seattle
Carvana offered me significantly more for my 2014 Audi S5 over my 2015 S5 (yes I owned two, long story, don't ask) because of the mileage. The 2014 had 10k fewer miles on it than the 2015 one. Also, the 2015 car had some scratches and rock chips compared to the 2014. IMO, mileage and maintenance was the bigger factor between the two offers. Look, I could be wrong as this is only one personal example that happened very recently and could be influenced by the insanity of the used-car market, but I did find it interesting nonetheless.
I think you know this is an apple and oranges comparison. You can't deduce much from comparing a car with 10k less miles and no damage to a newer one with damage.

People still search for used cars using year filters so it'll almost always be more valuable to have a newer model... even if it functionally matters less with Tesla since they rollout changes throughout the year.
 
I think you know this is an apple and oranges comparison. You can't deduce much from comparing a car with 10k less miles and no damage to a newer one with damage.

People still search for used cars using year filters so it'll almost always be more valuable to have a newer model... even if it functionally matters less with Tesla since they rollout changes throughout the year.
I think what can be deduced is just that the relative value add for a "future" model year is ambiguous. All things equal, a newer model year should fetch higher resale value than the older, but still a relatively unknown amount. For individuals who stand to lose very little or nothing to wait and get their hands on a 2022 it's fair to say they are getting a vehicle with "greater value" but for those whose situations are different, the opportunity cost of waiting on a 2022 (even if it's just superficially 2022 based on build date) could actually outweigh any resale value added.

Personally, each week that passes adds additional "cost" incurred by sharing a car with my SO. I would gladly take a car sooner than later, even if later meant more money at resale, because in the end the total cost of waiting will likely exceed what I can get back whenever I decided to sell.
 

PNWLeccy

Active Member
Jul 11, 2019
1,490
1,352
Seattle
I think what can be deduced is just that the relative value add for a "future" model year is ambiguous. All things equal, a newer model year should fetch higher resale value than the older, but still a relatively unknown amount. For individuals who stand to lose very little or nothing to wait and get their hands on a 2022 it's fair to say they are getting a vehicle with "greater value" but for those whose situations are different, the opportunity cost of waiting on a 2022 (even if it's just superficially 2022 based on build date) could actually outweigh any resale value added.

Personally, each week that passes adds additional "cost" incurred by sharing a car with my SO. I would gladly take a car sooner than later, even if later meant more money at resale, because in the end the total cost of waiting will likely exceed what I can get back whenever I decided to sell.
Right, but you are talking about external factors that impact your personal cost.

All things being equal, if you have a 2021 MY vs 2022 MY with the same options and same miles, the newer model is almost definitely more valuable. Even if it ends up not selling for more money, it will likely sell quicker because people perceive it as a better deal.

Ultimately, everyone's personal situation impacts the total cost or total value. I currently have a M3 so I won't be saving on fuel costs by getting the MY sooner. However, I have been monitoring the elevated resale value of my M3 because the longer I wait, the more likely my resale value could drop and negate any positive value I would gain from getting a 2022 VIN. In the end, we are likely weeks away from 2022 models being produced and I may not be able to take delivery since my EDD falls during a period I will be out of town. Life complicates every well laid plan...
 

jebinc

EndlessVibrating PLAID, cream/FSD; MYP, wht on wht
Supporting Member
Jun 19, 2019
8,579
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Seattle area
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The more I think about it (i.e., that is taking a September 2021, vs an October 2022), one should factor in whether or not they have a trade, and if that trade will expire by waiting. In my case, I have a trade that expires 9/28, and an EDD of 9/14-9/30. I'm now thinking, value wise, I might be better off taking the 2021 MYP and not waiting for the '22 in October. Just wanted to share the "trade" consideration/thought.
 
Right, but you are talking about external factors that impact your personal cost.

All things being equal, if you have a 2021 MY vs 2022 MY with the same options and same miles, the newer model is almost definitely more valuable. Even if it ends up not selling for more money, it will likely sell quicker because people perceive it as a better deal.

Ultimately, everyone's personal situation impacts the total cost or total value. I currently have a M3 so I won't be saving on fuel costs by getting the MY sooner. However, I have been monitoring the elevated resale value of my M3 because the longer I wait, the more likely my resale value could drop and negate any positive value I would gain from getting a 2022 VIN. In the end, we are likely weeks away from 2022 models being produced and I may not be able to take delivery since my EDD falls during a period I will be out of town. Life complicates every well laid plan...
Totally agree, I was just pointing out that despite the fact that a 2022 model should have a greater monetary value in the resale market, because of unknowns and potentially mounting opportunity costs depending on personal situation, it can be hard to determine if it ultimately boils down to being worth it. For many I suspect it isn't or too close to call.

That said, I think the additional resale value is an objectively valid point about the 2022 models. Financially speaking, if your situation allows you to get a 2022 over 2021 at no real additional cost, I don't see why you wouldn't do that. Even if the additional amount isn't that much greater, if it costs nothing for you to gain then it's a wise move.

Theoretically (emphasis on theoretically), should people put holds on their orders or relinquish them to wait until October or later, this would create a mutually beneficial scenario where the buyers who don't want to wait see greater efficiency in receiving their cars and increases demand/value for 2022 models, especially for anyone in position to sell it in 2022. If 2021 models can sell privately above MSRP, you're probably looking at a nice chunk of change in Q1 2022 assuming Tesla is still catching up to existing orders.
 
x-post

The more I think about it (i.e., that is taking a September 2021, vs an October 2022), one should factor in whether or not they have a trade, and if that trade will expire by waiting. In my case, I have a trade that expires 9/28, and an EDD of 9/14-9/30. I'm now thinking, value wise, I might be better off taking the 2021 MYP and not waiting for the '22 in October. Just wanted to share the "trade" consideration/thought.
I had a very similar realization shortly after I placed my order when I learned about some of the upgrades to the 2022 models. My initial thoughts were that if I could still get it by end of year, it could be well worth the wait for the additional range, improved QC, and anything else that would fetch a greater resale. Then I thought about making additional compromises for another 1-2 months as I waited and it dawned on me that the timing of my order was because I do truly need the car and that making these concessions was the financial/time burden that I was trying to solve in the first place.

On the other side of the coin, decisions on car buying can be deeply personal and at times irrational. We want things that don't make strict sense but we're ok with it. I wouldn't tell anyone to NOT wait for a 2022 model if they do really want it and its within reach, but probably worth a couple minutes to think about what you stand to lose and whether that bothers you.
 
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